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henryc

Bluray Burning Woes/ Skipping!

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Hey all,

 

I'm trying to burn my 26 minute short film (orignally HDV) to a BluRay disc. I've made some progress, but have now had some set backs. I'm using an LG Burner and Toast 9. Here was what I thought would be the work flow: Final Cut Pro -> HDV Bounce -> Toast 9.

 

I wasn't too pleased with the Toast encode (quality set to best.) The video didn't look too good (too compressed) and skipped all over the place. I'm testing playback in a PS3 connected HDMI to an LCD. Through some research I found out that you can encode for BluRay with Apple Compressor and import into Toast without re-encoding (just have Toast do the "multiplexing.") I did a 10 second test encode that ran great at 21mb/sec average and 25mb/sec max. So then I encoded the whole movie. Burnt it with Toast and....SKIPPING VIDEO! Every 5-20 seconds, the video hangs for 1-5 seconds. The interesting part is that I don't think it's related to the PS3 decoding. When you go frame by frame the video doesn't advance when it chokes - this means it's on the disc, no? So I blame Toast, because the MP2 is fine on my Mac.

 

Another thing I should note is that I bounced out my final video to DVCPROHD (1080i60.) I thought the HDV output was diminishing the quality a bit so I up-resed.

 

So I'm trying to encode again, this time with Toast (from the DVCPROHD) and I'll bet it skips too. So I'm wondering if there's a way around this. Anybody know a simple app to "multiplex" a BluRay disc? The quality with my compressor settings is really great when the video is flowing. (I'd gladly share - plus you can mate it with either a stereo AIF or a 5.1 AC3 file...pretty cool.)

 

I've heard some things about Encore as well. Can't seem to find the demo - either Mac or PC version.

 

Thanks again for any insight - this is certainly a brand new technology! My screening is in 10 days...we were planning on screening on BluRay so we don't have to output to HDCAM and rent a deck for playback. I guess last resort is DVD, but I hope I can figure it out by then!

 

Thanks!

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If you're burning a Blu-Ray to a standard DVD media, keep the avg. bit rate set to no higher than 15 Mbps. I don't beleive there is any way to burn bBlu-Ray with Toast WITHOUT Toast doing the encoding and muxing. I've tried various settings using Compressor to encode and Toast to jsut do the muxing, but it skips like you described.

 

I don't think anybody's found the magic workflow yet to encode outside of Toast.

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Here's your solution (assuming you can screen with your PS3)

 

Burn a Blu-ray disc in Toast - save as disc image.

 

Then open that disc image, go into the BDMV folder into Stream and get the file - probably named 0001.m2ts.

 

Rename that file something comprehensible, then burn that file as a data file to a DVD as a data disc which will play beautifully and skip-free in a PS3.

 

I had a project last week that had the same annoying skip behavior when Toast lets the bitrate get too high for AVCHD formatted discs. The other advantage to this approach on the PS3 is that since it shows up at a video file, the PS3 plays it back at 1080p rather than dropping it to 1080i like it would if coming from an AVCHD formatted disc.

 

Side note: The skipping you're seeing is Toast's fault - but it's not a problem with the disc. Toast (for some reason) allows the bitrate on Blu-ray encodes to spike way above the allowable 18 Mbit/sec for AVCHD on DVD. My guess is that they have one compression algorithm whether you're going to DVD or Blu-Ray disc and if momentarily the bitrate spikes to 27 Mbit/sec it's not a problem - if you're burning it into a Blu-ray disc. Burning to a DVD - that's a whole other problem.

Edited by revwally

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I usually check the video in Toast Video Player first, before even going to the PS3. You can usually tell if it's going to skip by the way it plays in Toast Video Player.

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That totally depends on the power of the mac it's playing on. My Mac Mini, with it's smokin' fast on-board Intel Graphics (ha ha ha) can't touch AVCHD files that my PS3 has no problem with whatsoever.

 

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