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Half Of Corporate Pcs Can't Run Vista


The Highlander

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What a Joke.... still will not make me update all of our systems and Desktops to run this....i think they are dreaming...

 

 

About half of corporate PCs are not equipped to run all the features of Windows Vista, and companies should plan to gradually deploy the upcoming operating system through new computers, rather than take the more expensive alternative of buying new hardware for older machines, a research firm said Monday.

 

Desktops or notebooks with less than 50 percent of their useful life left when Microsoft Corp. ships Vista, expected in January, should not be upgraded, since the cost would exceed replacing it with a new Vista-enabled machine at the end of the older computer's life cycle, Gartner Inc. said.

 

Assuming Microsoft does not suffer another delay, the cutoff point would be computers bought in 2006 or earlier. Gartner advises companies to replace notebooks every three years and desktops every four years. Given that most companies will take at least 18 months from the time Vista ships for planning and testing, by the time those organizations are ready to deploy the new OS, the useful life left on 2006 PCs would be about 17 percent on laptops and 37.5 percent on notebooks.

 

Among the major requirements of Vista, compared with Windows XP or 2000, is a graphics card that supports Vista's user interface and visual enhancements, which include translucent window frames and task bar, real-time thumbnail previews and task switching, enhanced transitional effects and animations. While these features within Aero won't be important for many companies, other improvements in the UI will, such as better window stability, smoother screen drawing and interface scaling.

 

In addition, computers will need at least 1GB of RAM to run Vista, and an additional 512MB if companies plan to use PC virtualization during the migration to run an older OS and Vista simultaneously, Gartner said. Just upgrading RAM on a PC costs from $100 to $200 per machine for many companies.

 

"Based on what we have seen so far, we believe that, for most large organizations, it will not be possible to fully justify the cost of a full forklift migration of all PCs," Gartner said in its research note. "This is partially because of the cost of most companies' manual migration process."

 

Continued at source...

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I think there is a basic fallicy in the Marketing P-L-A-N.

 

Most uses don't need the video upgrade.

 

To use docs and spreadsheets and databases, and make backups of them, you don't really need WinXP.

 

The cutting edge has moved quite a ways beyond business needs or the average compuer user surfing the web.

 

Lynn

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Maybe half of MS's stock is invested in hardware that will be needed to upgrade. Why do you think the retailers are ticked at the delay of Vista?

 

We have a few PC here at work (300+) and im no way im adding any with Vista, ill go buy a hand full of system builder OEM packs i think and roll back any new ones that come in.

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In the early days of DOS and Windows 3.0, hardware requirements started changing drastically, because of not only the infancy of the OS, but also because of the infancy of software and hardware.

 

Even though all is still probably considered in its infancy, I have more than enough power in the software, hardware, and OS, to run my consulting business. I do send out and receive many AutoCad files, and my version is getting old, but my computer can run the newest version, if I had it.

 

What I am getting at is, I have no need for all of the nonsense that will come with Vista. I already had a helluva time getting my upper grade HP printers and scanner to work with XP. HP never could get it right with the bi-directional communication with XP in any of their high priced printers, so those who use certain thing in the Toolbox, were SOL. I hate to see how the printers would act with Vista. It is bad enough that HP lowered themselves to merge with Compaq. :)

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If I'm wrong correct me. The consciences is it's not needed! Not needed for corporations or home use, or both?

 

The fortune 500 company I worked for, ran more w2000. Not hundred's of PC's, I couldn't even guess how many thousand's in just the five production facility's here.

 

I can only speak for my part of the World. Corporate America will be fine, out-sourcing, pension raiding, lower wages, and tax cuts for equipment upgrading, I wouldn't waste any time worrying about them!

 

Question then, what if EMC 9 system requirements are Vista.

Will "you all" upgrade long before corporations, for beta testing?

 

cdanteek

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Question then, what if EMC 9 system requirements are Vista.

Will "you all" upgrade long before corporations, for beta testing?

 

cdanteek

 

No, I won't. Will you? I don't anticipate that Roxio will shoot themselves in the foot (again), by making it a requirement to have Vista in your box.

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No, I won't. Will you? I don't anticipate that Roxio will shoot themselves in the foot (again), by making it a requirement to have Vista in your box.

I definitely won't either. The only reason I have XP on my laptop is that it came with it, and I was able to pick the system up (with a dead HD) cheap. Now we start getting into a discussion of when "enough is enough" happens. And that leads into the whole concept of free markets, capitalism, and greed. How can M$ (or Roxio/Sonic, or "insert name of company here") keep making (more) money if they don't come up with newer versions of their product that people "need" to have, regardless of whether the new features are anything people need or even want. Isn't that any companies greatest fear? That their latest product will be "enough" and no one will buy the "next"? Why else come up with the fancy UI for Vista? It drives more hardware sales. It requires more memory, more HD space, faster processors....

 

Okay, enough of the soapbox.

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Very good point... i think ill run mine off a VMWare test box...

 

 

VMWare $200 two OS's $400 to beta test a $59.00 program on a new OS.

 

 

Will You?

 

Probably, you were the one that wanted my PII W98 for a boat anchor! In a few years your Grandson

might say the same about your P4 with XP.

 

cdanteek

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I definitely won't either. The only reason I have XP on my laptop is that it came with it, and I was able to pick the system up (with a dead HD) cheap. Now we start getting into a discussion of when "enough is enough" happens. And that leads into the whole concept of free markets, capitalism, and greed. How can M$ (or Roxio/Sonic, or "insert name of company here") keep making (more) money if they don't come up with newer versions of their product that people "need" to have, regardless of whether the new features are anything people need or even want. Isn't that any companies greatest fear? That their latest product will be "enough" and no one will buy the "next"? Why else come up with the fancy UI for Vista? It drives more hardware sales. It requires more memory, more HD space, faster processors....

 

Okay, enough of the soapbox.

It has to do with something called a CURVE - as in Bell curve - which is less steep at the beginning and AT THE END ... people's jobs rest with the idea that the steep part is a straight line. The end of that steep part will probably be as difficult for some people's jobs as was the beginning.

 

Lynn

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Guest mlpasley
It requires more memory, more HD space, faster processors....

 

Not to mention all those book sales..... Windows for Dummies, Windows Secrets.... etc.

 

And all those new versions of software that will be 'compatable' with Vista.......

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How I hated to go from one operating system to another as Microsoft changed. I was the late one on DOS 1.1, through DOS 6.x, to Win 3.x, to win 95, to win 98.x, and to win 2000 & XP !!!. And I'm sure I will most likely be the last one to upgrade to Vista too :huh: . Not only that, but all during that change of operating systems, I also changed my hardware !! AND---I started with EMC 7 and now am at 7.5. And as my history has proven, I will probable be that last one to upgrade to emc 8, but it will happen-------Probably when 9.x comes out :)

 

Frank....

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VMWare $200 two OS's $400 to beta test a $59.00 program on a new OS.

Will You?

 

Probably, you were the one that wanted my PII W98 for a boat anchor! In a few years your Grandson

might say the same about your P4 with XP.

 

cdanteek

We use VMWare fully in our work envoyoment fully, i live off it....

so in this case my answer is "dam strait i will"

But for someone who is starting from scratch... then id say "Not"

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I definitely won't either. The only reason I have XP on my laptop is that it came with it, and I was able to pick the system up (with a dead HD) cheap. Now we start getting into a discussion of when "enough is enough" happens. And that leads into the whole concept of free markets, capitalism, and greed. How can M$ (or Roxio/Sonic, or "insert name of company here") keep making (more) money if they don't come up with newer versions of their product that people "need" to have, regardless of whether the new features are anything people need or even want. Isn't that any companies greatest fear? That their latest product will be "enough" and no one will buy the "next"? Why else come up with the fancy UI for Vista? It drives more hardware sales. It requires more memory, more HD space, faster processors....

 

Okay, enough of the soapbox.

I happened to bring up the subject of Vista in a discussion with my software guru - who has never been very enthusiastic about Microsoft ... altho I suppose spending a couple decades unsnarling the MS-caused problems in a Mainframe may have something to do with it.

 

And she said the MAIN point of Vista is to support Microsoft's newe dot-NET, the on-line Version of Office, etc. She didn't think it would work out too well, even on MS's 3rd attempt to do enterprise software, but the joke going the rounds is "they've finally learned how to spell 'enterprise'."

 

Lynn

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