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Recording Level Too High


dr keith
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I'm starting to get the hang of this after having digitized an old set of Chopin piano records and a 90 minute cassette of Handel's Messiah (all are over 20 years old).

 

I'm connecting the Amplifier's "Tape Out" connection to the "Line In" of my Dell Latitude Laptop. I notice that the recording level indicator is very quick to go into the "red" area. I'm keeping the little "adjuster" triangle almost to the very low end of the bar. A few times - while recording the piano LP, it still went into the red even though the music was not very loud.

 

When one plugs the cord into the "Line In" on this laptop, the computer asks whether this is for mic, line, or some other device, and I choose "Line In".

 

I cannot find any other way - either thru Win XP or the Sigma Tel audio driver - to adjust the recording level down. This is, of course, unaffected by the volume control on the stereo amp.

 

Thanks,

Keith

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When you pick Auto make sure you are playing the louder passages in the music.This will keep the meters from clipping.

 

Classical music is hard to capture like this and get the volume correct.This is because of the way that it has quiet and loud passages unlike other types of music.

 

Another thing you can try is to go into Windows Mixer and in the Recording section turn the volume down on the Line-In.

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Thanks. I'm using a Dell Lattitude 830 and Win XP SP3. Under "Audio", Dell has added a driver called "Sigma Tel Audio". For the recording, I'm using Roxio Creator 2009. Within it, I have recorded using both (1) Convert LPs and Tapes into digital as well as (2) Recording thru Audio Editor portion of the program.

 

My stereo that I purchased around 1977 consists of an old Marantz 1070 Stereo amp, Marantz 6200 Turntable, and a Sharp dual cassette deck (only one bay of which works).

 

I have the "Tape Out" jacks for Tape #2 on my amp connected via a Y-cable to the "Line In" of my Dell Laptop. When the dropdown menu appears upon inserting the plug into the computer, I choose "Line In" as opposed to microphone.

 

With either of these, I must have the Recording Level slider almost all the way to the left.

 

I have used the "Auto" button - and noted the little bubble that appears while it is calibrating - as well. It appears that this function simply detects, analyses, then makes its adjustment by moving the "Recording Level" slider just as one would by hand. If this slider is already at the low end, the "Auto" button can't do anything.

 

I have gone to my "Audio Controls" section thru Win XP Control Panel to find the Audio Mixer controls. The "Line In" slider is all the way down.

 

It appears that this control slider is linked to the "Record Level" slider in Roxio in that moving one also moves the other.

 

I was looking for some "middle layer" of management in Windows in which there was some other input level set too high.

 

I was recording some old Chopin piano LPs which, I admit, might be difficult to gauge the dynamics since the piano has a sharp attack followed by a decay.

 

Another LP was a recording of the King's College Choir singing Christmas music. I noticed the indicator spiking into the red occasionally despite the fact that the LP has always played softer on my stereo than other LPs.

 

The tapes are ones I made over 20 years ago of some Readers Digest Christmas LPs as well as Sandi Patti and Amy Grant.

 

Anyway, If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.

 

Thanks,

Keith

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Thanks. I'm using a Dell Lattitude 830 and Win XP SP3. Under "Audio", Dell has added a driver called "Sigma Tel Audio". For the recording, I'm using Roxio Creator 2009. Within it, I have recorded using both (1) Convert LPs and Tapes into digital as well as (2) Recording thru Audio Editor portion of the program.

 

My stereo that I purchased around 1977 consists of an old Marantz 1070 Stereo amp, Marantz 6200 Turntable, and a Sharp dual cassette deck (only one bay of which works).

 

I have the "Tape Out" jacks for Tape #2 on my amp connected via a Y-cable to the "Line In" of my Dell Laptop. When the dropdown menu appears upon inserting the plug into the computer, I choose "Line In" as opposed to microphone.

 

With either of these, I must have the Recording Level slider almost all the way to the left.

 

I have used the "Auto" button - and noted the little bubble that appears while it is calibrating - as well. It appears that this function simply detects, analyses, then makes its adjustment by moving the "Recording Level" slider just as one would by hand. If this slider is already at the low end, the "Auto" button can't do anything.

 

I have gone to my "Audio Controls" section thru Win XP Control Panel to find the Audio Mixer controls. The "Line In" slider is all the way down.

 

It appears that this control slider is linked to the "Record Level" slider in Roxio in that moving one also moves the other.

 

I was looking for some "middle layer" of management in Windows in which there was some other input level set too high.

 

I was recording some old Chopin piano LPs which, I admit, might be difficult to gauge the dynamics since the piano has a sharp attack followed by a decay.

 

Another LP was a recording of the King's College Choir singing Christmas music. I noticed the indicator spiking into the red occasionally despite the fact that the LP has always played softer on my stereo than other LPs.

 

The tapes are ones I made over 20 years ago of some Readers Digest Christmas LPs as well as Sandi Patti and Amy Grant.

 

Anyway, If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.

 

Thanks,

Keith

 

 

Double check this:

 

When you go into the Volume Controls (Start>Programs>Accessories>Entertainment>Volume Control. make sure you go into Options>Properties and then select Recording and make your adjustments there to control the Line In level.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Digital Guru. I just did that - and had already done that as well. I made sure I had checked "recording controls". All three of the inputs: Line, Microphone, Internal Mic are set at the bottom of their positions.

 

A friend of mine many years ago had a stereo that had an adjustable "output level", which might solve my problem right now if I had one.

 

I had tho't about trying to access a different output on my amp. There's another output on the rear of my amp labelled "preamp out". When I plug into that pair, I lose my sound from the main speakers much as one does when one plugs in a headphone.

 

Since I seem to be unable to record and listen at the same time using my Laptop, I need to have some way of hearing. As I mentioned in another posting, I do not seem to be able to monitor the recording using a headphone plugged into the headphone jack of my laptop while I'm recording. Of course, I can listen thru it when i'm editing - but that's for another day.

 

I found a book I had purchased a while back entitled "Windows XP Inside Out" by Bott and Siechert and could not find anything about adjusting the recording level in it.

 

I appreciate the help. I AM able to record as I have already digitized a couple hours' worth of music and put it into my ipod. I just get a little distortion when the meter reaches the top, and there doesn't appear to be anything I can do about it right now.

 

Anyway, thanks. I hate to waste folks' time.

 

BTW, at the moment I get an "Error 404" whenever I click on the link to download a Creator 2009 User's Guide.

 

Keith

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Thanks. I'm using a Dell Lattitude 830 and Win XP SP3. Under "Audio", Dell has added a driver called "Sigma Tel Audio". For the recording, I'm using Roxio Creator 2009. Within it, I have recorded using both (1) Convert LPs and Tapes into digital as well as (2) Recording thru Audio Editor portion of the program.

 

My stereo that I purchased around 1977 consists of an old Marantz 1070 Stereo amp, Marantz 6200 Turntable, and a Sharp dual cassette deck (only one bay of which works).

 

I have the "Tape Out" jacks for Tape #2 on my amp connected via a Y-cable to the "Line In" of my Dell Laptop. When the dropdown menu appears upon inserting the plug into the computer, I choose "Line In" as opposed to microphone.

 

With either of these, I must have the Recording Level slider almost all the way to the left.

 

I have used the "Auto" button - and noted the little bubble that appears while it is calibrating - as well. It appears that this function simply detects, analyses, then makes its adjustment by moving the "Recording Level" slider just as one would by hand. If this slider is already at the low end, the "Auto" button can't do anything.

 

I have gone to my "Audio Controls" section thru Win XP Control Panel to find the Audio Mixer controls. The "Line In" slider is all the way down.

 

It appears that this control slider is linked to the "Record Level" slider in Roxio in that moving one also moves the other.

 

I was looking for some "middle layer" of management in Windows in which there was some other input level set too high.

 

I was recording some old Chopin piano LPs which, I admit, might be difficult to gauge the dynamics since the piano has a sharp attack followed by a decay.

 

Another LP was a recording of the King's College Choir singing Christmas music. I noticed the indicator spiking into the red occasionally despite the fact that the LP has always played softer on my stereo than other LPs.

 

The tapes are ones I made over 20 years ago of some Readers Digest Christmas LPs as well as Sandi Patti and Amy Grant.

 

Anyway, If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.

 

Thanks,

Keith

 

 

Tape out is playbace, I believe. You should have the plugs in the Tape 2 Rec(ord) jacks. Those go to your "y" connector and into your Line In on your sound card.

 

This is the way it works, if you are trying to record, using your turntable and LP's. Your computer becomes your tape deck.

Edited by grandpabruce
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grandpabruce said: Tape out is playbace, I believe. You should have the plugs in the Tape 2 Rec(ord) jacks. Those go to your "y" connector and into your Line In on your sound card. This is the way it works, if you are trying to record, using your turntable and LP's. Your computer becomes your tape deck.

 

That's how I have it. Perhaps something got lost in my explanation. The old amp has inputs/outputs for two tape players. It took a while when I first got the stereo to figure out that the "out" on the tape deck plugs into the "in" on the back of the amp, and the "out" on the amp goes into the "in" on the tape deck.

 

So, I have my tape deck plugged into the "tape in" for Tape #1 on my amp. I have the Y-connector attached to the Tape #2 "out" connector going to the "line in" of my laptop instead of going to the "in" connector of a 2nd tape deck.

 

Not meaning to insult anyone, in simplest terms, I have the music going "OUT" of the tape deck "IN" to the Tape #1 IN connector on the amp, thru the preamp of the amp, "OUT" the Tape #2 "OUT" connector and "IN" to the "Line In" of my Laptop.

 

Interestingly, I tried a little experiment. As I mentioned in the previous posting, my amp has another pair of connector s labelled "Preamp Out".

 

While I had the Roxio on "Pause" and the tape playing, I unplugged the Y-connector from the Tape Out jacks and plugged them into the "Preamp Out". My sound disappeared from my stereo speakers. I noticed that the "recording level" indicators had gone way down. I adjusted the "recording level" slider up to the midpoint, and the indicators were moving well indicating that the recording level was appropriate. The only problem is that I could hear nothing. It didn't matter how I set the "Source" knob on my amp. Apparently, connecting to these jacks bypasses the final amplifier in my amp (like plugging in a headphone).

 

I guess, I could simply make the recording blindly (or deafly if I'm being particular). Then, after it's over, go into the editing mode and adjust the position of the track separators.

 

Perhaps there's an intermediate electronic box or digitizer that I can interpose between my stereo and computer that will adjust down the recording levels

 

When I used to record from LP to Cassette, I never remember having trouble keeping the recording levels below the red.

 

Thanks. I hate to waste too much bandwidth with what should be a simple solution.

 

Keith

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grandpabruce said: Tape out is playbace, I believe. You should have the plugs in the Tape 2 Rec(ord) jacks. Those go to your "y" connector and into your Line In on your sound card. This is the way it works, if you are trying to record, using your turntable and LP's. Your computer becomes your tape deck.

 

That's how I have it. Perhaps something got lost in my explanation. The old amp has inputs/outputs for two tape players. It took a while when I first got the stereo to figure out that the "out" on the tape deck plugs into the "in" on the back of the amp, and the "out" on the amp goes into the "in" on the tape deck.

 

So, I have my tape deck plugged into the "tape in" for Tape #1 on my amp. I have the Y-connector attached to the Tape #2 "out" connector going to the "line in" of my laptop instead of going to the "in" connector of a 2nd tape deck.

 

Not meaning to insult anyone, in simplest terms, I have the music going "OUT" of the tape deck "IN" to the Tape #1 IN connector on the amp, thru the preamp of the amp, "OUT" the Tape #2 "OUT" connector and "IN" to the "Line In" of my Laptop.

 

Interestingly, I tried a little experiment. As I mentioned in the previous posting, my amp has another pair of connector s labelled "Preamp Out".

 

While I had the Roxio on "Pause" and the tape playing, I unplugged the Y-connector from the Tape Out jacks and plugged them into the "Preamp Out". My sound disappeared from my stereo speakers. I noticed that the "recording level" indicators had gone way down. I adjusted the "recording level" slider up to the midpoint, and the indicators were moving well indicating that the recording level was appropriate. The only problem is that I could hear nothing. It didn't matter how I set the "Source" knob on my amp. Apparently, connecting to these jacks bypasses the final amplifier in my amp (like plugging in a headphone).

 

I guess, I could simply make the recording blindly (or deafly if I'm being particular). Then, after it's over, go into the editing mode and adjust the position of the track separators.

 

Perhaps there's an intermediate electronic box or digitizer that I can interpose between my stereo and computer that will adjust down the recording levels

 

When I used to record from LP to Cassette, I never remember having trouble keeping the recording levels below the red.

 

Thanks. I hate to waste too much bandwidth with what should be a simple solution.

 

Keith

 

Whenever I recorded from a cassette tape deck I always connected directly from the tape deck to the PC, I never had to use a "amp"

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grandpabruce said: Tape out is playbace, I believe. You should have the plugs in the Tape 2 Rec(ord) jacks. Those go to your "y" connector and into your Line In on your sound card. This is the way it works, if you are trying to record, using your turntable and LP's. Your computer becomes your tape deck.

 

That's how I have it. Perhaps something got lost in my explanation. The old amp has inputs/outputs for two tape players. It took a while when I first got the stereo to figure out that the "out" on the tape deck plugs into the "in" on the back of the amp, and the "out" on the amp goes into the "in" on the tape deck.

 

So, I have my tape deck plugged into the "tape in" for Tape #1 on my amp. I have the Y-connector attached to the Tape #2 "out" connector going to the "line in" of my laptop instead of going to the "in" connector of a 2nd tape deck.

 

Not meaning to insult anyone, in simplest terms, I have the music going "OUT" of the tape deck "IN" to the Tape #1 IN connector on the amp, thru the preamp of the amp, "OUT" the Tape #2 "OUT" connector and "IN" to the "Line In" of my Laptop.

 

Interestingly, I tried a little experiment. As I mentioned in the previous posting, my amp has another pair of connector s labelled "Preamp Out".

 

While I had the Roxio on "Pause" and the tape playing, I unplugged the Y-connector from the Tape Out jacks and plugged them into the "Preamp Out". My sound disappeared from my stereo speakers. I noticed that the "recording level" indicators had gone way down. I adjusted the "recording level" slider up to the midpoint, and the indicators were moving well indicating that the recording level was appropriate. The only problem is that I could hear nothing. It didn't matter how I set the "Source" knob on my amp. Apparently, connecting to these jacks bypasses the final amplifier in my amp (like plugging in a headphone).

 

I guess, I could simply make the recording blindly (or deafly if I'm being particular). Then, after it's over, go into the editing mode and adjust the position of the track separators.

 

Perhaps there's an intermediate electronic box or digitizer that I can interpose between my stereo and computer that will adjust down the recording levels

 

When I used to record from LP to Cassette, I never remember having trouble keeping the recording levels below the red.

 

Thanks. I hate to waste too much bandwidth with what should be a simple solution.

 

Keith

 

 

You mentioned that you were recording Chopin LP vinyl albums. You did not say that you were recording from a tape deck.

 

If the music is on your tape deck, then you have it connected properly. If that is the case, your mention of vinyl records is superfluous.

 

If you are recording, from the turntable, there is no need to go through the tape deck to dump it on your comptuer.

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"You mentioned that you were recording Chopin LP vinyl albums. You did not say that you were recording from a tape deck."

 

I'm doing both. I'm digitizing some LPs as well as some cassette tapes. I'm simply having the same problem with recording level with either process.

 

I did a little online research about digitizing LPs and Videos prior to purchasing Roxio and ran across a few articles for DIYers. It was said that most audio devices could be connected directly to the computer with the exception of a turntable (unless one has the kind that contain a pre-amp). Some other site had recommended purchasing an interface box that would go between the turntable and the computer. Others simply recommended using the "record out" jacks of one's stereo.

 

When I finished a play room in the basement, I brought my old college stereo down from the attic and set it up (Amp, Tuner, Cassette Deck, Turntable, CD Player, VHS/DVD Player).

 

I was trying to follow the advice of some others by simply putting whatever my "original medium" is into its appropriate player and connecting my laptop to my stereo exactly as I would another tape deck and using it to record the audio files.

 

Thanks. Gonna quit for tonight. Son just got home from college.

 

Keith

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"You mentioned that you were recording Chopin LP vinyl albums. You did not say that you were recording from a tape deck."

 

I'm doing both. I'm digitizing some LPs as well as some cassette tapes. I'm simply having the same problem with recording level with either process.

 

I did a little online research about digitizing LPs and Videos prior to purchasing Roxio and ran across a few articles for DIYers. It was said that most audio devices could be connected directly to the computer with the exception of a turntable (unless one has the kind that contain a pre-amp). Some other site had recommended purchasing an interface box that would go between the turntable and the computer. Others simply recommended using the "record out" jacks of one's stereo.

 

When I finished a play room in the basement, I brought my old college stereo down from the attic and set it up (Amp, Tuner, Cassette Deck, Turntable, CD Player, VHS/DVD Player).

 

I was trying to follow the advice of some others by simply putting whatever my "original medium" is into its appropriate player and connecting my laptop to my stereo exactly as I would another tape deck and using it to record the audio files.

 

Thanks. Gonna quit for tonight. Son just got home from college.

 

Keith

 

To quote, you just click on the Reply button. Pay no attention to the Quote button. It doesn't do what is says. :)

 

I am using my 37 year old Pioneer SX-9000 Amp, so your Marantz should be fine. Going out of your amp, is the right way to do it, and there are 2 different ways to connect the cables, as mentioned before.

 

For recording, from the turntable, do it the way that I said. I haven't dumped any LP's, for about 4 months, so I will have a go at it, when I get time, and see if I have a problem with Creator 2009. The last LP's that I reorded, were done on EMC 10.

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Interestingly, I tried a little experiment. As I mentioned in the previous posting, my amp has another pair of connector s labelled "Preamp Out".

 

While I had the Roxio on "Pause" and the tape playing, I unplugged the Y-connector from the Tape Out jacks and plugged them into the "Preamp Out". My sound disappeared from my stereo speakers. I noticed that the "recording level" indicators had gone way down. I adjusted the "recording level" slider up to the midpoint, and the indicators were moving well indicating that the recording level was appropriate. The only problem is that I could hear nothing. It didn't matter how I set the "Source" knob on my amp. Apparently, connecting to these jacks bypasses the final amplifier in my amp (like plugging in a headphone).

 

I guess, I could simply make the recording blindly (or deafly if I'm being particular). Then, after it's over, go into the editing mode and adjust the position of the track separators.

 

 

Keith

If you have a set of "Preamp Out" jacks on the back of your amp, is there also a set of "Main Amp In" jacks? If so, you should be able to put a pair of "Y" adapters (two RCA Plugs, one RCA jack) to connect through the Preamp Out/Main In and tap into those Y adapters for the signal to your PC, and still be able to hear on your stereo's speakers. But yes, that gives you a way of attenuating the signal going to your sound card. Alternatively, you could buy just a little stereo mixer to do the same thing. I did that when I was using a USB Audio input device, because it had no volume controls, so I had to be able to adjust the volume going into the unit.

 

Hope that helps!

Edited by d_deweywright
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If you have a set of "Preamp Out" jacks on the back of your amp, is there also a set of "Main Amp In" jacks? If so, you should be able to put a pair of "Y" adapters (two RCA Plugs, one RCA jack) to connect through the Preamp Out/Main In and tap into those Y adapters for the signal to your PC, and still be able to hear on your stereo's speakers. But yes, that gives you a way of attenuating the signal going to your sound card. Alternatively, you could buy just a little stereo mixer to do the same thing. I did that when I was using a USB Audio input device, because it had no volume controls, so I had to be able to adjust the volume going into the unit.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Sorry I'm dense about this. I certainly hope that I will soon be able to contribute something of value to this forum instead of asking questions. Nevertheless, until then . . .

 

In using a pair of these Y adapters, I'm assuming that one will be for "L" and the other for "R". Are you saying that the two "plugs" of one cable bridge across the Left "Preamp out" and "Main In" and the other bridges across these for the Right. Then the pair of "jacks" - one for each L and R - are connected to the cable that goes to my computer?

 

I can kind of understand how that might work, but I don't want to blow anything up.

 

I'm wanting to have the system set up so that I can leave a cable hanging out that I simply connect to my computer so I don't have to slide my amp out - the connections of which are tight - in order to change connections for using Roxio, then have to reconnect in order for others to be able to use the stereo.

 

I did conduct another experiment before going to Radio shack.

 

1. I interposed a Y adapter consisting of a 1/8" stereo plug and two 1/8" stereo female connectors. Leaving my connection from the stereo connected to Tape #2 "Record Out" and plugging it into one of the jacks of the Y, I plugged a small headphone set into the other jack of the Y and the plug into the laptop.

 

It appeared that the headphones drew off enough current that the recording level indicators stayed in the midrange. The problem with this is that the headphones will act as a microphone infusing the sound of the foam rubbing against my hair as well as a little ambient noise into the signal that is coming from the computer. Sound continued to come thru the main speakers.

 

2. If I instead connect to the "Preamp Out", the headphones draw off too much current, and I have to turn the volume control on the stereo up much higher as well as slide up the "Recording level" on the Roxio record screen. In addition to the potential problem mentioned above of the headphones acting as mics, I now lose the sound from my main speakers.

 

3. I decided to try a set of Acoustic Research Wireless Speakers that I had sitting around. They connect to an output device using a 1/8" stereo plug. I figured that there would be no "direct" connection to a magnet (headphone) that could act as a microphone. Leaving the other connection plugged into the "Preamp out", I tried this. Now the "Recording Level" is very easy to control, and I can monitor the recording process thru the wireless speaker. Using a combination of the amp's volume control, the volume control on the wireless speaker, and the recording level slider on Roxio, I can control both the recording as well as the monitoring volumes.

 

4. When I now move the amp connection back to the "Tape #2 Record Out" as in step 1, the signal strength increased greatly, and I even had to turn the volume control on the wireless speaker as well as the output level of the wireless transmitter way down. Apparently, the wireless transmitter draws off very little of the current fron the Y connector. But, I now have my main speakers, so I'm back where I started.

 

Anyway, I am having success using the setup #3. I'm able to monitor the recording. The recording level is not going into the red even though I have the slider in Roxio set in the mid range. But . . . I will have to disconnect and reconnect when I'm done for the day in case someone else wants to listen to something with the stereo.

 

That's why I'm asking about connection you mentioned using the RCA "Y" cables. I can see how that might be the answer for me. I guess I'll have to go back to Radio Shack tomorrow - unless I can find a couple "female" RCA jacks and cut and splice for another experiment.

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Sorry I'm dense about this. I certainly hope that I will soon be able to contribute something of value to this forum instead of asking questions. Nevertheless, until then . . .

 

In using a pair of these Y adapters, I'm assuming that one will be for "L" and the other for "R". Are you saying that the two "plugs" of one cable bridge across the Left "Preamp out" and "Main In" and the other bridges across these for the Right. Then the pair of "jacks" - one for each L and R - are connected to the cable that goes to my computer?

Yes, a "L" and "R" adapter to bridge across the Preamp Out and Main In. No, you won't blow anything up because that's the same internal connection that is being interrupted when you plug something into the Preamp Out jacks. (Most amps that I've seen with that feature actually have a little "bridge" piece that you have to remove to connect in there.)

 

If your headphone connection is working for you, then that's fine too. Whatever can get you an appropriate level to the sound card's line-in.

 

Now, I may have missed it, and you may have done this already, but there are two sets of controls for most sound cards, playback and recording controls, and they look identical. When you open your mixer, click "Options" and "Properties". Then make sure you select the "Recording" button, make sure the Line In control is selected, and click "Okay". See if that gives you any new control over your input level. If not, then either the Preamp Out/Main In, or Headphone option should do what you need.

 

Hope that helps!

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Yes, a "L" and "R" adapter to bridge across the Preamp Out and Main In. No, you won't blow anything up because that's the same internal connection that is being interrupted when you plug something into the Preamp Out jacks. (Most amps that I've seen with that feature actually have a little "bridge" piece that you have to remove to connect in there.)

 

If your headphone connection is working for you, then that's fine too. Whatever can get you an appropriate level to the sound card's line-in.

 

Now, I may have missed it, and you may have done this already, but there are two sets of controls for most sound cards, playback and recording controls, and they look identical. When you open your mixer, click "Options" and "Properties". Then make sure you select the "Recording" button, make sure the Line In control is selected, and click "Okay". See if that gives you any new control over your input level. If not, then either the Preamp Out/Main In, or Headphone option should do what you need.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Dave

 

I asked the user that in post 5 and he responded in (post#6) that he was in the "recording control.

 

Tony

 

 

 

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Yes, a "L" and "R" adapter to bridge across the Preamp Out and Main In. No, you won't blow anything up because that's the same internal connection that is being interrupted when you plug something into the Preamp Out jacks. (Most amps that I've seen with that feature actually have a little "bridge" piece that you have to remove to connect in there.)

 

If your headphone connection is working for you, then that's fine too. Whatever can get you an appropriate level to the sound card's line-in.

 

Now, I may have missed it, and you may have done this already, but there are two sets of controls for most sound cards, playback and recording controls, and they look identical. When you open your mixer, click "Options" and "Properties". Then make sure you select the "Recording" button, make sure the Line In control is selected, and click "Okay". See if that gives you any new control over your input level. If not, then either the Preamp Out/Main In, or Headphone option should do what you need.

 

Hope that helps!

 

In my mesage around 3:30 yesterday, I mentioned about going to "Audio Controls" thru "Control Panel" in WinXP. I did find the tab for "Recording" as opposed to "Playback". This control was all the way to the lowest point. I will repeat, though, that the "recording level" control in WinXP appears to be linked to the "recording level" control in Roxio. As I observe the windows for both (Roxio and Control Panel Audio Controls) I see one slider move as I manually move the other. So it appears that Roxio does not employ a separate input control from the operating system. Changes made thru either method are mirrored in the other - the same way the pilot and co-pilots sticks are linked.

 

I started to fashion my own bridges from some old cables left over from other stereo components, but I figured I'd get lost in keeping the polarities separated. I'm not exactly certain which is the "common" either. I assume that a "Y" connector reduces 2 pairs of wires into 1 pair + a common (L+L-/R+R- into L+R+/C-). I tho't about trying to tap into the middle of a component cable by cutting thru the insulation and identifying the wires, but realized that that would be more tedious than trying to perform a "minimal incision vasectomy" on a mouse. So I'd be better off simply purchasing a pair of Y connectors as you recommended.

 

I managed to record another LP (Christmas music for Trumpet/Brass ensemble) using setup #3 in my previous posting. It worked quite well.

 

So, going back to your suggestion of bridging the Main In + Preamp Out. I just want to make certain that I get it connected correctly.

 

1. I will need two Y adapters each of which has a pair of males and a single female.

2. I assume that I will connect the males of one adapter in the two "Left" connections ("L Main In" & "L Preamp Out") and the males of the other into the two "Right" connections ("R Main In" & "R Preamp Out") - as opposed to connecting one Y adapter to the "L&R Main In" and the other to the "L&R Preamp Out".

3. The female end of each - the Left Y and the Right Y - will become the new L & R connectors into which I plug the cable I've been using to go into my laptop.

 

I'll keep my fingers crossed for complete success tomorrow after I vote and get some Thanksgiving shopping done. I'd like to be able to close this thread on a positive note.

 

Thanks,

KZ

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In my mesage around 3:30 yesterday, I mentioned about going to "Audio Controls" thru "Control Panel" in WinXP. I did find the tab for "Recording" as opposed to "Playback". This control was all the way to the lowest point. I will repeat, though, that the "recording level" control in WinXP appears to be linked to the "recording level" control in Roxio. As I observe the windows for both (Roxio and Control Panel Audio Controls) I see one slider move as I manually move the other. So it appears that Roxio does not employ a separate input control from the operating system. Changes made thru either method are mirrored in the other - the same way the pilot and co-pilots sticks are linked.

 

I started to fashion my own bridges from some old cables left over from other stereo components, but I figured I'd get lost in keeping the polarities separated. I'm not exactly certain which is the "common" either. I assume that a "Y" connector reduces 2 pairs of wires into 1 pair + a common (L+L-/R+R- into L+R+/C-). I tho't about trying to tap into the middle of a component cable by cutting thru the insulation and identifying the wires, but realized that that would be more tedious than trying to perform a "minimal incision vasectomy" on a mouse. So I'd be better off simply purchasing a pair of Y connectors as you recommended.

 

I managed to record another LP (Christmas music for Trumpet/Brass ensemble) using setup #3 in my previous posting. It worked quite well.

 

So, going back to your suggestion of bridging the Main In + Preamp Out. I just want to make certain that I get it connected correctly.

 

1. I will need two Y adapters each of which has a pair of males and a single female.

2. I assume that I will connect the males of one adapter in the two "Left" connections ("L Main In" & "L Preamp Out") and the males of the other into the two "Right" connections ("R Main In" & "R Preamp Out") - as opposed to connecting one Y adapter to the "L&R Main In" and the other to the "L&R Preamp Out".

3. The female end of each - the Left Y and the Right Y - will become the new L & R connectors into which I plug the cable I've been using to go into my laptop.

I'll keep my fingers crossed for complete success tomorrow after I vote and get some Thanksgiving shopping done. I'd like to be able to close this thread on a positive note.

 

Thanks,

KZ

Sorry I missed the part about finding the Recording controls.

 

Yes, what the first condition above is correct for connecting the new "Y" connectors into the Preamp Out/Main In, L to L and R to R. The other possibility will not blow anything up, but it will give you a mono signal out of the Preamp, and nothing going into the Main In. So go with the L to L and R to R connection, with the female connectors being the new output to your PC.

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Hope eveyone had a Happy Thanksgiving. Anyway, I wanted to get back with y'all about this problem. It's solved thanks to y'all. I've been really busy these past few days, so I only made it back to Radio Shack today. I purchased the Y-adapters along with some other adapters. After connecting them to the "Main In" and "Preamp Out" connectors, then attaching the Y cable to it and the 1/8" plug into my computer, I'm able to monitor the sound from my main speakers. The Recording Level showing in Roxio is somewhat attenuated and easily restrained to the area below the red.

 

Of course, my old Marantz amp is a little persnickety. The right speakers tend to go in and out as you wriggle the volume control. I might have to suspend a little weight from the knob to keep it consistent. A few years ago I replaced the On/Off button after I kept hearing sparks. I ordered it from some carrier of vintage Marantz parts.

 

BTW, I also purchased connectors with which to connect my old Korg electric piano into the laptop. Of course, plugging into the separate L and R jacks for the headphones disengages the speakers, so I have to use my Y-connector to tap into cable in order to listen. Anyway, The recording levels were fine on the computer.

 

So, all is good right now. Thanks again for the help.

 

Keith

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Hope eveyone had a Happy Thanksgiving. Anyway, I wanted to get back with y'all about this problem. It's solved thanks to y'all. I've been really busy these past few days, so I only made it back to Radio Shack today. I purchased the Y-adapters along with some other adapters. After connecting them to the "Main In" and "Preamp Out" connectors, then attaching the Y cable to it and the 1/8" plug into my computer, I'm able to monitor the sound from my main speakers. The Recording Level showing in Roxio is somewhat attenuated and easily restrained to the area below the red.

 

Of course, my old Marantz amp is a little persnickety. The right speakers tend to go in and out as you wriggle the volume control. I might have to suspend a little weight from the knob to keep it consistent. A few years ago I replaced the On/Off button after I kept hearing sparks. I ordered it from some carrier of vintage Marantz parts.

 

BTW, I also purchased connectors with which to connect my old Korg electric piano into the laptop. Of course, plugging into the separate L and R jacks for the headphones disengages the speakers, so I have to use my Y-connector to tap into cable in order to listen. Anyway, The recording levels were fine on the computer.

 

So, all is good right now. Thanks again for the help.

 

Keith

Thanks for letting us know! We like to hear what's actually worked for people.

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