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Newly Burned Cd For Automobile Use


trottmad
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I successfully followed procedures to copy LP albums to a CD. In doing so, the CD effectively reproduced sound over my computer. But, when I put the CD in my automobile it would not "play." A message "Check CD" showed on the radio. What did I do / not do to cause such a reaction?

 

What sort of CD did you create .MP3/.WAV ?

 

Did you use CD-R or CD-RW ?

 

Will it play in a CD player other than your car.

 

 

Edited by ogdens
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I successfully followed procedures to copy LP albums to a CD. In doing so, the CD effectively reproduced sound over my computer. But, when I put the CD in my automobile it would not "play." A message "Check CD" showed on the radio. What did I do / not do to cause such a reaction?

As was asked, what type of disc did you use, CD-R (write once) or CD-RW (erasable). Make sure you use a CD-R disc as they are more readable. If you did use a CD-R disc, you may need to try a different brand of disc to find one that your player likes and can read.

 

Also, if you look at the disc you created using Windows Explorer, do you see something like:

 

Track01.cda

Track02.cda

.

.

.

 

or do you see "real" filenames with a different file type?

 

Let us know.

Edited by d_deweywright
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What sort of CD did you create .MP3/.WAV ?

 

Did you use CD-R or CD-RW ?

 

Will it play in a CD player other than your car.

 

 

I used both kinds but prefer CD-RW.

 

I created .WAV

 

The CD that I created would play just fine on my computer but it would not play in my car nor on my CD player.

 

Tracks shown in Internet Explorer did not reflect .cda extension.

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I used both kinds but prefer CD-RW.

 

I created .WAV

 

The CD that I created would play just fine on my computer but it would not play in my car nor on my CD player.

 

Tracks shown in Internet Explorer did not reflect .cda extension.

Okay, so you created a Data CD of .WAV files. That's nothing that your car CD player will recognize. You need to make an Audio CD. Look for that option and try again. Also, if your car player winds up not liking CD-RW discs, use the 10 cent or 25 cent CD-R discs. They're cheap enough, and many car players do not like CD-RW discs.

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Okay, so you created a Data CD of .WAV files. That's nothing that your car CD player will recognize. You need to make an Audio CD. Look for that option and try again. Also, if your car player winds up not liking CD-RW discs, use the 10 cent or 25 cent CD-R discs. They're cheap enough, and many car players do not like CD-RW discs.

 

 

OK. Will go to Plan B, namely the Audio CD (CD-R), and give it another try. Thanks guys. I appreciate your counsel.

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OK. Will go to Plan B, namely the Audio CD (CD-R), and give it another try. Thanks guys. I appreciate your counsel.

You don't have to use the special "Audio Only" CD-R's, regular CD-R's are fine. And you can try CD-RW discs, just make sure you're telling the program to write an Audio CD, not a Data CD. It's the format of the information that's written to the disc that's different, not the media.

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Another thing you might try has to do with the burning speed. For the CD with the wav files to play on older and automobile players you should cut the burning speed to about half of the usual.

 

My question -- I have converted an audio cassette to a .wav file and tracked it into 13 tracks. However, when I try to put the tracks onto the Music Creator Disk screen, it only accepts nine tracks. What gives?

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Another thing you might try has to do with the burning speed. For the CD with the wav files to play on older and automobile players you should cut the burning speed to about half of the usual.

 

My question -- I have converted an audio cassette to a .wav file and tracked it into 13 tracks. However, when I try to put the tracks onto the Music Creator Disk screen, it only accepts nine tracks. What gives?

Well, if you have a 90 minute tape, and a CD that'll hold 80 minutes, it may indeed be that you have 4 tracks more than the CD will hold. An audio CD will only hold 80 minutes typically. (In the "old" days, that standard was 72 minutes, and before that, only 63 minutes.) Hope that helps!

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