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Problem Ripping LPs


ehedemann

Question

I'm trying to rip tracks off LPs on my turntable but am having trouble getting a signal in my computer.

 

I have a Dell 9100, 3.2 GHZ dual processor, 2 GB SDRAM, SB Audigy 2 ZS, and plenty of HD space. I have a RCA to 3.5MM stereo mini Y-cable (via RadioShack) from the receiver (Kenwood 4070) that my turntable (a BIC 940) is hooked up to a port in my soundcard. The soundcard ports aren't easily readable, so I tried all 6 of them trying to find the line-in.

 

Where to plug the Y-cable into the back of my receiver is a bit of a mystery to me. My only port options appear to be what are labeled 2 "Phono Inputs" (L & R), 2 "Aux Inputs" (L & R), 4 "Tape" ports ("Rec" L & R and "Play" L & R). I assumed that I'm supposed to hook the Y end of the cable to the "Aux Inputs." Then on the front of the receiver is a "Selector" dial, whose settings include AM, FM/Auto, FM/Mono, Phono, Aux. I tried both Phono and Aux.

 

I've followed the instructions in LP & Tape Assistant. I've tried EMC Easy Audio Capture with the recording channel set to Analog Mix. I've opened Sound Recorder to see if I can get a signal, but no luck.

 

The really annoying thing about all this is that I was able to do this easily with my old computer using the same turntable and receiver. I have not been able to get this to work with my new (as of last summer) computer. Any ideas on what might be the problem?

 

Ed

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I also have a Sound Blaster Audigy 2Z sound card and have done pretty much what you are wanting to do. The only difference is I have a stand alone turntable that plays 78's, 33's and 45 records. It has an RCA out jack that I use to connect to my 2Z sound card. I bought a small rCA to mini-plug adapter that fits the RCA jack and the other end is plugged into the "Line In" port on the 2Z card.

 

From top to bottom on the SB 2Z sound card the ports are:

top---digital Out

2nd from top--Line In

3rd from top--Mic In

4th--Line Out-1

5th--Line Out-2

6th--Line Out-3

and the bottom on mine is an IEEE 1394 firewire port.

 

I just plug the mini audio plug coming from the turntable into the "Line in" port (2nd from top) on the sound card and away I go. BTW, I also am using a free downloadable program named "Audiograbber" to capture any sounds from the turntable (and any other hardware devices that I have that have an out port for the sound). Audiograbber is a very simple program to use and captures audio as "wav" files.

 

Check out the connections to your receiver and turntable again and the other end of the cable into the 2nd port down on your sound card. Hope some of this helps. Let us know how your are doing.

 

Frank....

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I'm trying to rip tracks off LPs on my turntable but am having trouble getting a signal in my computer.

 

I have a Dell 9100, 3.2 GHZ dual processor, 2 GB SDRAM, SB Audigy 2 ZS, and plenty of HD space. I have a RCA to 3.5MM stereo mini Y-cable (via RadioShack) from the receiver (Kenwood 4070) that my turntable (a BIC 940) is hooked up to a port in my soundcard. The soundcard ports aren't easily readable, so I tried all 6 of them trying to find the line-in.

 

Where to plug the Y-cable into the back of my receiver is a bit of a mystery to me. My only port options appear to be what are labeled 2 "Phono Inputs" (L & R), 2 "Aux Inputs" (L & R), 4 "Tape" ports ("Rec" L & R and "Play" L & R). I assumed that I'm supposed to hook the Y end of the cable to the "Aux Inputs." Then on the front of the receiver is a "Selector" dial, whose settings include AM, FM/Auto, FM/Mono, Phono, Aux. I tried both Phono and Aux.

 

I've followed the instructions in LP & Tape Assistant. I've tried EMC Easy Audio Capture with the recording channel set to Analog Mix. I've opened Sound Recorder to see if I can get a signal, but no luck.

 

The really annoying thing about all this is that I was able to do this easily with my old computer using the same turntable and receiver. I have not been able to get this to work with my new (as of last summer) computer. Any ideas on what might be the problem?

 

Ed

 

On your receiver your Turntable should be connected to your Phono Input, then on the front of your receiver you would select the Phono as your source.

On the back of your receiver there should be a LINE OUT jack which you would connect to the Line In on your sound card , (just like you did with your old computer).

 

Open your Volume Control, (Start>Programs>Accessories>Entertainment>Volume Control) ensure Line-In is not muted (unchecked), then under "Options" select "Properties", click "Recording" and insure that Line-In is checked. Click "OK" and you will see the volume controls for recording. Insure Line-In is selected

(checked) as your recording device and set to a proper level

 

If you need more info get back on here (I could not find a Kenwood 4070 model on the internet so I can not be specific on the "line out" jack).

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On your receiver your Turntable should be connected to your Phono Input, then on the front of your receiver you would select the Phono as your source.

On the back of your receiver there should be a LINE OUT jack which you would connect to the Line In on your sound card , (just like you did with your old computer).

 

Open your Volume Control, (Start>Programs>Accessories>Entertainment>Volume Control) ensure Line-In is not muted (unchecked), then under "Options" select "Properties", click "Recording" and insure that Line-In is checked. Click "OK" and you will see the volume controls for recording. Insure Line-In is selected

(checked) as your recording device and set to a proper level

 

If you need more info get back on here (I could not find a Kenwood 4070 model on the internet so I can not be specific on the "line out" jack).

Yes, I do have the turntable connected to the phono input, and with "phono" on the selector dial, and the music does go through the speakers connected to the receiver. I just do not see a "line out" jack anywhere on the back of the receiver (just the ones I mentioned in the first message). I wish I hadn't forgotten which port I used when it worked a year or two ago with my old computer.

 

Yes, I did make sure the Line-in was not muted in Volume Control. I had RadioShack test the Y-cable to make sure that wasn't a problem.

 

I also have a Sound Blaster Audigy 2Z sound card and have done pretty much what you are wanting to do. The only difference is I have a stand alone turntable that plays 78's, 33's and 45 records. It has an RCA out jack that I use to connect to my 2Z sound card. I bought a small rCA to mini-plug adapter that fits the RCA jack and the other end is plugged into the "Line In" port on the 2Z card.

 

From top to bottom on the SB 2Z sound card the ports are:

top---digital Out

2nd from top--Line In

3rd from top--Mic In

4th--Line Out-1

5th--Line Out-2

6th--Line Out-3

and the bottom on mine is an IEEE 1394 firewire port.

 

I just plug the mini audio plug coming from the turntable into the "Line in" port (2nd from top) on the sound card and away I go. BTW, I also am using a free downloadable program named "Audiograbber" to capture any sounds from the turntable (and any other hardware devices that I have that have an out port for the sound). Audiograbber is a very simple program to use and captures audio as "wav" files.

 

Check out the connections to your receiver and turntable again and the other end of the cable into the 2nd port down on your sound card. Hope some of this helps. Let us know how your are doing.

 

Frank....

 

 

Yes, I do have an IEEE port. My receiver doesn't appear to have a "line-out" jack anywhere. But since I was able to use that turntable-receiver combo with my old computer, I'm at a loss to figure out what is wrong this time. At least you've confirmed that my problem isn't my sound card.

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Is there any possibility you used a headphones output jack on the receiver when you did this before? You would have to carefully adjust volume on both the receiver and computer to attempt this.

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What is the exact model # on your Kenwood receiver? Also what country was this purchsed.

 

 

It's KR-4070. It was purchased in Manhattan, ages ago.

 

Is there any possibility you used a headphones output jack on the receiver when you did this before? You would have to carefully adjust volume on both the receiver and computer to attempt this.

 

That had occurred to me but it needs an adaptor because the microphone jack is a larger size and, off hand, I don't have such an adaptor (or else I misplaced it). I'll see if I can find one.

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I have an old Sansui about that age. That's about when Dolby was just coming into use. Check to see if you have a pair of "Dolby out plugs). I'm pretty sure that I used those for capture. BTW, both my receiver and my Dual turntable still work (bought in about 71) ! I found some pictures of the front and back of your unit on the web but the resolution is poor so I can't see what jacks are there.

 

Also, if you are still having a problem, you can buy an external amp for that turntable - probably less than $30 - I bought one at Circuit City. You connect it between the turntable and your computer, plug it in and adjust the output. Simple and cheap. If you want to replace the turntable with one that has a phono output, they run about $300 and up. You can also get a new turntable with a preamp for just over $100. I have Sony one that I bought last year that works great - just plug that directly into the sound card on your computer.

 

As previously warned, make sure your headphone jack is turned all the way down to begin with. There is a possibility of blowing out your computer's sound card if the input is too high.

 

It's KR-4070. It was purchased in Manhattan, ages ago.

That had occurred to me but it needs an adaptor because the microphone jack is a larger size and, off hand, I don't have such an adaptor (or else I misplaced it). I'll see if I can find one.

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Generally on a receiver the only outs you get are to some kind of recording device,tape,dat,whatever.You could try the tape outs and see if that will work.Receivers are generally designed to put the output to the speaker terminals.Another possibility would be if there is a jumper on the back that lets you seperate the preamplifier section from the amplifier section.You could remove the jumper and put your cable into the preamp plugs.

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Generally on a receiver the only outs you get are to some kind of recording device,tape,dat,whatever.You could try the tape outs and see if that will work.Receivers are generally designed to put the output to the speaker terminals.Another possibility would be if there is a jumper on the back that lets you seperate the preamplifier section from the amplifier section.You could remove the jumper and put your cable into the preamp plugs.

 

Actually, it is the Tape rec. jacks that you want. Those are the ones that I use on the back of my amp. You are wanting to record from your turntable to your computer. The computer, in this case, takes the place of your reel to reel or cassette deck. Therfore, you want to plug your computer sound card into the tape rec jacks on the back of the amp.

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I was looking at the back of my preamp when I said Tape out.They could be labeled either way,out or rec,it doesn't matter.The main point is as Bruce says is to get the ones that are outputs that allow you to record.Once you get those you'll have a line level input going into your computer and should be in business.

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Actually, it is the Tape rec. jacks that you want. Those are the ones that I use on the back of my amp. You are wanting to record from your turntable to your computer. The computer, in this case, takes the place of your reel to reel or cassette deck. Therfore, you want to plug your computer sound card into the tape rec jacks on the back of the amp.

Ah ha, that did it! I plugged the Y-cable into the Tape Rec (L&R) jacks at the back of the receiver (with the selector on "Phono"), and the other end of the cable into the 2nd from the right port (Line-in) of my SB 2Z sound card, and got the signal into my computer. Thank you very much.

 

I was looking at the back of my preamp when I said Tape out.They could be labeled either way,out or rec,it doesn't matter.The main point is as Bruce says is to get the ones that are outputs that allow you to record.Once you get those you'll have a line level input going into your computer and should be in business.

That worked. I don't know what I was doing wrong before since I was trying ever different combination of plugs, jacks, and other seeting. Must not have tried that particular combination.

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Ah ha, that did it! I plugged the Y-cable into the Tape Rec (L&R) jacks at the back of the receiver (with the selector on "Phono"), and the other end of the cable into the 2nd from the right port (Line-in) of my SB 2Z sound card, and got the signal into my computer. Thank you very much.

That worked. I don't know what I was doing wrong before since I was trying ever different combination of plugs, jacks, and other seeting. Must not have tried that particular combination.

 

You are welcome. Now, get to recording those LP's. hehehe It is time consuming, but fun.

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