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Status: Signal Protected [in Red]

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I am trying to capture video from my Hi-8 sony handycam (stop laughing). I can see the video in the capture screen when it's playing. But at what seems to be random intervals, the Status will change from 'Capturing' [in black text] to Signal Protected [in red text] which stops the video capture and prompts me to save or discard the current captured video. It's becoming real difficult to just set the deal to 'capture now' and go get a sandwich or something.

 

ggrussel on this forum has offered me some ideas and I've tried them all. Some got me further and others worked for a moment and then stopped. I am grateful for his help (nobody likes to be bothered so late at night by strangers) and I would love it if someone could help me give it one more go before I scrap the program altogether and send it back to sonic solutions.

 

So far I have tried:

removed all other USB devices.

close all other unnecessary apps

cross my fingers

pray to multiple deities

 

 

Is the video capture usb overheating? is it not getting enough power? could the hi88 cassette have a bump or scratch that causes the capture to seize up? could it really be both great tasting AND less filling?

 

Any help or advice would be great. I'm at the point where I feel like I should be able to figure it out but I've exhausted all my brains in this area of computerdom.

 

thanks

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Hi Troo -

 

We actually have an article waiting in the wings for this issue. I'm not sure what Gary suggested, but here is the text that will be published shortly. It's probably not the answer everybody wants to hear, but it's been confirmed by our engineers:

 

 

 

Defective or damaged tape

 

This error is caused by the tape itself being defective. When defective, the signal pulses on the tape itself can become unsynced or be nonexistent. This creates a signal, or lack thereof, that can be confused for copy protection by the capture device or Creator. While the tape may playback fine, some of the data that ensures a proper signal may be missing.

 

A VHS tape can become defective for the following reasons:

 

  • Storage. If the tape has been stored in a moist environment or where the tape isn't fully wound in either direction, this can cause environmental wear on the tape surface and break in the signal causing the error. Also, if the tape is stored near a magnetic field (on top of a TV, for example) - or even some metals - this can disrupt the signal.
  • Over usage. If the tape has been repeatedly recorded over or has recording inserted in the middle of the video, this creates a new sync pulse and data that can throw the device or software off causing the capture to stop. Also, if the cassette has been recorded over many times, this can degrade the tape reducing the signal strength.
  • Age. An old VHS cassette tape can become more brittle with age, and while able to play back, some of the magnetic data on the tape may decompose or demagnetize enough to create data breaks or reduce the signal strength.

 

To verify if the tape is defective, use a brand new VHS cassette - or your newest cassette available - and record a fresh section of video for about 10 minutes. Playback 30 seconds into the new recording and begin capturing to see if it's successful.

 

Alternately, if you wish to continue recording the VHS tape you are experiencing the "Signal Protected" message with, the next best option is record the video in sections and then assemble the production in Videowave.

 

 

Copy protection

 

Hollywood movies generally have Macrovision copy protection to prevent illegal copying. More information can be found in the article CopyGuard or Macrovision error message.

 

Jon

 

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I am trying to capture video from my Hi-8 sony handycam (stop laughing). I can see the video in the capture screen when it's playing. But at what seems to be random intervals, the Status will change from 'Capturing' [in black text] to Signal Protected [in red text] which stops the video capture and prompts me to save or discard the current captured video. It's becoming real difficult to just set the deal to 'capture now' and go get a sandwich or something.

 

ggrussel on this forum has offered me some ideas and I've tried them all. Some got me further and others worked for a moment and then stopped. I am grateful for his help (nobody likes to be bothered so late at night by strangers) and I would love it if someone could help me give it one more go before I scrap the program altogether and send it back to sonic solutions.

 

So far I have tried:

removed all other USB devices.

close all other unnecessary apps

cross my fingers

pray to multiple deities

 

 

Is the video capture usb overheating? is it not getting enough power? could the hi88 cassette have a bump or scratch that causes the capture to seize up? could it really be both great tasting AND less filling?

 

Any help or advice would be great. I'm at the point where I feel like I should be able to figure it out but I've exhausted all my brains in this area of computerdom.

 

thanks

What I've done to capture Sony 8mm I have is record the whole tape on the DVD recorder I use for my tv, then capture that disc w/ Roxio, edit in Videowave, etc. you'll have no capture issues. Not perfect, but if nothing else works, I say, any port in a storm ....

 

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Wow, that sucks just a little bit. I had considered it could be a tape damage issue, but I brushed it off as a reason early on since the tape is brand new. However, the tape in question contains daily log footage of an extended stay atop a scissor lift, so there may be debris or 'bump' issues that I just wouldn't know about or be able to do anything about anyways. Also, recording the video in sections would be extremely time consuming as the hiccups occur as frequent as actual hiccups. :) Well darn!

 

I was hoping it was a software issue, but since it's a hardware issue, there's really nothing I can do. I like the idea of recording straight to dvd...I just don't have that technology (I mean, I still use a Hi8 camcorcder for goodness sake).

 

Would the 'hiccup' issue in the tape affect the video capture the same way if I was going to try and rip straight to a dvd on the laptop? I assume it would...but all I know so far is that I can't just capture the video straight to my laptop. Will I encounter the same trouble if trying to burn a dvd on the laptop straight from the camcorder? I don't have any dvd's to burn on, so I'll have to get them, and I would hate to have to make the purchase if you can assure me that it won't work anyways. Thanks for the help guys. I hope we can get this figured out.

 

Hi Troo -

 

We actually have an article waiting in the wings for this issue. I'm not sure what Gary suggested, but here is the text that will be published shortly. It's probably not the answer everybody wants to hear, but it's been confirmed by our engineers:

 

 

 

Defective or damaged tape

 

This error is caused by the tape itself being defective. When defective, the signal pulses on the tape itself can become unsynced or be nonexistent. This creates a signal, or lack thereof, that can be confused for copy protection by the capture device or Creator. While the tape may playback fine, some of the data that ensures a proper signal may be missing.

 

A VHS tape can become defective for the following reasons:

 

  • Storage. If the tape has been stored in a moist environment or where the tape isn't fully wound in either direction, this can cause environmental wear on the tape surface and break in the signal causing the error. Also, if the tape is stored near a magnetic field (on top of a TV, for example) - or even some metals - this can disrupt the signal.
  • Over usage. If the tape has been repeatedly recorded over or has recording inserted in the middle of the video, this creates a new sync pulse and data that can throw the device or software off causing the capture to stop. Also, if the cassette has been recorded over many times, this can degrade the tape reducing the signal strength.
  • Age. An old VHS cassette tape can become more brittle with age, and while able to play back, some of the magnetic data on the tape may decompose or demagnetize enough to create data breaks or reduce the signal strength.

 

To verify if the tape is defective, use a brand new VHS cassette - or your newest cassette available - and record a fresh section of video for about 10 minutes. Playback 30 seconds into the new recording and begin capturing to see if it's successful.

 

Alternately, if you wish to continue recording the VHS tape you are experiencing the "Signal Protected" message with, the next best option is record the video in sections and then assemble the production in Videowave.

 

 

Copy protection

 

Hollywood movies generally have Macrovision copy protection to prevent illegal copying. More information can be found in the article CopyGuard or Macrovision error message.

 

Jon

Edited by troo

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Thanks everyone for their contributions to this thread. I have had exactly the same problems working with non-copy protected VHS tapes, which are all 15+ years old and have not been played in a long time. And it is very frustrating! That is why I have suggested in other posts that the program seems very sensitive to protection schemes. If I understand this correctly, defects in the tape might cause VHS2DVD to 'think' the tape is copy protected when in reality it is not. Now to find a work-around. I wonder if playing the tape and then rewinding a couple of times would help. That's about all I can think of. Any other suggestions???

 

As an aside, I have read it is better to store tapes in the played condition, rather than rewinding. Less stress on the tape. Of course, I have never done this.

Edited by Scott O

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Thanks everyone for their contributions to this thread. I have had exactly the same problems working with non-copy protected VHS tapes, which are all 15+ years old and have not been played in a long time. And it is very frustrating! That is why I have suggested in other posts that the program seems very sensitive to protection schemes. If I understand this correctly, defects in the tape might cause VHS2DVD to 'think' the tape is copy protected when in reality it is not. Now to find a work-around. I wonder if playing the tape and then rewinding a couple of times would help. That's about all I can think of. Any other suggestions???

 

Hi Scott -

 

Actually, how about duping the tape to another VHS machine? Basically the issue is the worn or funky tape form age, humidity, abuse, etc.

 

If there is a second VHS player, use a fresh, clean tape and dub to it. This *should* restripe the tape with a clean sync pulse thus eliminating the noise and error.

 

Yes, we are talking about some degradation (I recommended using SP mode) in duplication, but if the tapes have neat memories, it may be worth a shot.

 

It's the best theory I have right now.

 

Jon

 

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Hi Scott -

 

Actually, how about duping the tape to another VHS machine? Basically the issue is the worn or funky tape form age, humidity, abuse, etc.

 

If there is a second VHS player, use a fresh, clean tape and dub to it. This *should* restripe the tape with a clean sync pulse thus eliminating the noise and error.

 

Yes, we are talking about some degradation (I recommended using SP mode) in duplication, but if the tapes have neat memories, it may be worth a shot.

 

It's the best theory I have right now.

 

Jon

 

Thanks Jon. I had thought about this, but the quality degradation and the fact that I don't know where to get another VHS player put it on the back-burner for now. Hopefully something else will come up, but I may have to resort to your suggestion if all else fails. Why can't anything be easy????

 

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Thanks Jon. I had thought about this, but the quality degradation and the fact that I don't know where to get another VHS player put it on the back-burner for now. Hopefully something else will come up, but I may have to resort to your suggestion if all else fails. Why can't anything be easy????

Did you read my suggestion in post 4? Is that not a possibility?

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Did you read my suggestion in post 4? Is that not a possibility?

 

Hi Syrallas -

 

It seems I unintentionally stole your idea :o

 

Yes, it's as a good work around as any. I think any duping is a good best effort. VHS machines can be had at thrift stores if your looking to experiment on the cheap.

 

Jon

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Hi Syrallas -

 

It seems I unintentionally stole your idea :o

 

Yes, it's as a good work around as any. I think any duping is a good best effort. VHS machines can be had at thrift stores if your looking to experiment on the cheap.

 

Jon

No problem -- great minds and all. :rolleyes:

 

I like the dvd route because capturing DVDs w/ Roxio has never been a problem, and you can record at highest quality recording on a DVD RW (1 disc holding only 1 hr of video), so quality drop should be minimal.

 

Plus, RW allows you to only use 1 disc ....

 

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I have the same problem.

It seems the program will only work if the video feed is perfect. No breaks in the film.

I dont know who does family films like that. The reason I bought this piece of crap is so I can

save my 15 year old family videos.

It all comes down to the protection for copyrighted material. Its so sensitive that the progrom wont work.

 

Sorry but this solution is useless. Some old poor quality home films have glitches throughout. And once you start the thing, when it gives you the protection error, you cant pick it back up on the same dvd, so you could go though dozens of dvds to make a movie.

 

 

Hi Troo -

 

We actually have an article waiting in the wings for this issue. I'm not sure what Gary suggested, but here is the text that will be published shortly. It's probably not the answer everybody wants to hear, but it's been confirmed by our engineers:

 

 

 

Defective or damaged tape

 

This error is caused by the tape itself being defective. When defective, the signal pulses on the tape itself can become unsynced or be nonexistent. This creates a signal, or lack thereof, that can be confused for copy protection by the capture device or Creator. While the tape may playback fine, some of the data that ensures a proper signal may be missing.

 

A VHS tape can become defective for the following reasons:

 

  • Storage. If the tape has been stored in a moist environment or where the tape isn't fully wound in either direction, this can cause environmental wear on the tape surface and break in the signal causing the error. Also, if the tape is stored near a magnetic field (on top of a TV, for example) - or even some metals - this can disrupt the signal.
  • Over usage. If the tape has been repeatedly recorded over or has recording inserted in the middle of the video, this creates a new sync pulse and data that can throw the device or software off causing the capture to stop. Also, if the cassette has been recorded over many times, this can degrade the tape reducing the signal strength.
  • Age. An old VHS cassette tape can become more brittle with age, and while able to play back, some of the magnetic data on the tape may decompose or demagnetize enough to create data breaks or reduce the signal strength.

 

To verify if the tape is defective, use a brand new VHS cassette - or your newest cassette available - and record a fresh section of video for about 10 minutes. Playback 30 seconds into the new recording and begin capturing to see if it's successful.

 

Alternately, if you wish to continue recording the VHS tape you are experiencing the "Signal Protected" message with, the next best option is record the video in sections and then assemble the production in Videowave.

 

 

Copy protection

 

Hollywood movies generally have Macrovision copy protection to prevent illegal copying. More information can be found in the article CopyGuard or Macrovision error message.

 

Jon

 

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I have the same problem.

It seems the program will only work if the video feed is perfect. No breaks in the film.

I dont know who does family films like that. The reason I bought this piece of crap is so I can

save my 15 year old family videos.

It all comes down to the protection for copyrighted material. Its so sensitive that the progrom wont work.

 

Sorry but this solution is useless. Some old poor quality home films have glitches throughout. And once you start the thing, when it gives you the protection error, you cant pick it back up on the same dvd, so you could go though dozens of dvds to make a movie.

 

Hi Nightmoves -

 

I understand. VHS tapes didn't come with any tips on how to take care of them, much less the proper way to shoot video with cameras.

 

But, did you try any of the other ideas in this thread? The duping suggestion for example? I'm waiting on feedback from users to see if it is successful. If so, then I'll add it to the article. Yes, it's an extra step, but better than not being able to transfer anything at all.

 

Thanks,

 

Jon

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In order to protect copyrights, Roxio has put things in their program that guarantee the average user wont be able to make it work. There is no warning on the box. There is no work around. We should all go out and buy a vhs player and rerecord the tapes? Maybe it will work? Are you kidding me?

Roxio should be facing a class action law suit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Nightmoves -

 

I understand. VHS tapes didn't come with any tips on how to take care of them, much less the proper way to shoot video with cameras.

 

But, did you try any of the other ideas in this thread? The duping suggestion for example? I'm waiting on feedback from users to see if it is successful. If so, then I'll add it to the article. Yes, it's an extra step, but better than not being able to transfer anything at all.

 

Thanks,

 

Jon

 

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Nightmoves - the copy protection signal is sent by your VCR - there is a circuit built into all VCRs for a long time now that is designed to do what it is doing.

 

It's not the fault of the program that your VCR is picking up a signal from a faulty tape and telling the computer that the tape is 'protected'

 

If you want to initiate any legal action, consider initiating it against the people who added the circuitry to the VCR in the first place

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Nightmoves - the copy protection signal is sent by your VCR - there is a circuit built into all VCRs for a long time now that is designed to do what it is doing.

 

It's not the fault of the program that your VCR is picking up a signal from a faulty tape and telling the computer that the tape is 'protected'

 

If you want to initiate any legal action, consider initiating it against the people who added the circuitry to the VCR in the first place

 

Nightmoves -

 

gi7omy is correct. As referenced in this article from howstuffworks.com:

 

It's not that the second VCR "knows" that the video signal is coming from a video tape. It's that the signal coming from the original video tape contains a special type of noise that the TV set doesn't notice but a VCR cannot handle. This noise signal confuses a component, known as an automatic gain control (AGC) circuit, in the VCR, and the confused AGC records the signal incorrectly.

 

An older tape maybe creating this noise unintentionally, adding extra sync pulses through print through (an analog tape issues where the magnetixation of wound tape prints a ghost image of the signal on the tape layers - Robert Plant's echo in Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" is the famous example) can add additional issues as well depending on how long the tape has been wound and how tight. In other words, the variables are pretty endless.

 

This is why we are asking customers to try the duping option as a work around. But since they may also get blocked for the same reasons, we are hesitant to put it onto an article as a suggestion just yet.

 

However, if you are unsatisfied with your product, we offer a 30 day no-questions-asked return policy if you purchased the product from the Roxio eStore.

 

Jon

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I am trying to capture video from my Hi-8 sony handycam (stop laughing). I can see the video in the capture screen when it's playing. But at what seems to be random intervals, the Status will change from 'Capturing' [in black text] to Signal Protected [in red text] which stops the video capture and prompts me to save or discard the current captured video. It's becoming real difficult to just set the deal to 'capture now' and go get a sandwich or something.

 

ggrussel on this forum has offered me some ideas and I've tried them all. Some got me further and others worked for a moment and then stopped. I am grateful for his help (nobody likes to be bothered so late at night by strangers) and I would love it if someone could help me give it one more go before I scrap the program altogether and send it back to sonic solutions.

 

So far I have tried:

removed all other USB devices.

close all other unnecessary apps

cross my fingers

pray to multiple deities

 

 

Is the video capture usb overheating? is it not getting enough power? could the hi88 cassette have a bump or scratch that causes the capture to seize up? could it really be both great tasting AND less filling?

 

Any help or advice would be great. I'm at the point where I feel like I should be able to figure it out but I've exhausted all my brains in this area of computerdom.

 

thanks

 

 

I have been having the same problems!!! I have been transferring tapes from my camcorder on 8 & Hi8 tapes. They were new tapes and constantly kept getting "signal protected" like you for no apparent reason. There were many times this happened on several tapes! I can relate as to your frustration :angry2:

What I ended up doing was transferring the tapes directly to a DVD with my DVD burner then transferring from the DVD burned to the computer using the USB video capture and that seemed to work and didn't get the red messages of error and was more successful.

The other problem that I encountered when I tried using Roxio to burn a video movie it goes through the encoding process for a large percentage of the file and then up pops an error "can't burn "unspecified error".

I ended up using Windows Movie Maker to create the DVD which worked.

I am thinking this Roxio program isn't all they profess it to be.

There was also a problem loading the software. It wouldn't load the drivers for the USB video capture. I eventlyually got it sorted out by going online and getting the drivers from there. <_<<_<<_<:rolleyes::unsure:

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Regarding the transfer problem - read post 17 - it's the Video device that is causing it - NOT the program. Believe me on this one - I was service manager for a TV repair company and that was ALWAYS a complaint from people trying to copy commercial tapes.

 

Problems encoding? Some specs please (that's a different problem)

 

Start a new thread on that and also give your computer specs - CPU speed, RAM and graphics

 

You could try updating yopur graphics from the card maker's site (ATI, nVidia or whatever) and also install the latest DirectX from MS (rendering movie files actually needs the graphics card to do it correctly)

Edited by gi7omy

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I have been having the same problems!!! I have been transferring tapes from my camcorder on 8 & Hi8 tapes. They were new tapes and constantly kept getting "signal protected" like you for no apparent reason. There were many times this happened on several tapes! I can relate as to your frustration :angry2:

What I ended up doing was transferring the tapes directly to a DVD with my DVD burner then transferring from the DVD burned to the computer using the USB video capture and that seemed to work and didn't get the red messages of error and was more successful.

The other problem that I encountered when I tried using Roxio to burn a video movie it goes through the encoding process for a large percentage of the file and then up pops an error "can't burn "unspecified error".

I ended up using Windows Movie Maker to create the DVD which worked.

I am thinking this Roxio program isn't all they profess it to be.

There was also a problem loading the software. It wouldn't load the drivers for the USB video capture. I eventlyually got it sorted out by going online and getting the drivers from there. <_<<_<<_<:rolleyes::unsure:

 

So how did you transfer the tape video directly to a DVD?

Once you have the video on the DVD there is no need to use the USB device to capture at all. Just copy the VIdeo_TS folder from the DVD to your hard drive and then add the vob files in myDVD to burn.

BTW, how did you manage to create a DVD using WMM? As far as I know WMM does not burn DVDs.

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Hi Nightmoves -

 

I understand. VHS tapes didn't come with any tips on how to take care of them, much less the proper way to shoot video with cameras.

 

But, did you try any of the other ideas in this thread? The duping suggestion for example? I'm waiting on feedback from users to see if it is successful. If so, then I'll add it to the article. Yes, it's an extra step, but better than not being able to transfer anything at all.

 

Thanks,

 

Jon

 

I don't agree with the reason that the Signal Protection issue is due to poor quality HI 8 tapes or old HI 8 tapes. I am having the same Signal Protected issue when I try capturing from a HI 8 tape playing in my camcorder. The tape is brand new! Give me a break! If this is indeed a hardware issue, Roxio is still responsible! You should have had disclaimers on your product that it may not work with HI 8 tapes. In that case I wouldn't have bought it in the first place. Maybe you never tested the transferring of a HI 8. That is pretty sad man! What good is your product if it can't transfer a brand new HI 8.

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Do you seriously believe that a tape in a camera which is out and about doesn't produce an error on the tape?

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I don't agree with the reason that the Signal Protection issue is due to poor quality HI 8 tapes or old HI 8 tapes. I am having the same Signal Protected issue when I try capturing from a HI 8 tape playing in my camcorder. The tape is brand new! Give me a break! If this is indeed a hardware issue, Roxio is still responsible! You should have had disclaimers on your product that it may not work with HI 8 tapes. In that case I wouldn't have bought it in the first place. Maybe you never tested the transferring of a HI 8. That is pretty sad man! What good is your product if it can't transfer a brand new HI 8.

 

Hi Jomega -

 

Sorry it took so long to get back you.

 

Even though our QA tested Hi-8 tapes before the release with success, I forwarded your post to verify. They complied in good faith and as a favor and NOT standard procedure for them to take requests. B)

 

Indeed they were able to capture video with Hi-8 tapes...some of them from our own employees dating back to 1993.

 

One aspect that we have left out of the article is the cleanliness of the tape heads themselves.

 

A quick primer: tape emulsion - whether it be on audio, video, or even digital tapes - all use the same recording and playback mechanism as VCRs (except analog audio of course) which is a cylindrical head. The tape itself is made of magnetic emulsion can become very sticky if the tape is even a little moist or flake off if too dry. These particulates end up on contact points in the playback gear including the head and can cause read errors or - if you have ever used a DAT machine - stop the tape completely.

 

Here is a great article on how tapes can be degraded, the types of degradation, and even loose advice on tape baking (NOT recommended if you have never heard the term before).

 

Also, tapes can degrade if brand new and sealed. There is no guarantee how the retailer you purchased them from stored them and for how long in that condition. When stored new, heat is a bigger factor than moisture.

 

Short answer: try cleaning the heads of your camcorder or VHS player. FYI, tape cleaners that use the white colored tape is pretty much low grade sandpaper and should not be over/re used. I used to only run them for 30 second intervals until the error went away. The cleaners with little pads (VHS only - i have yet to see these for smaller formats) you put alcohol on and insert are much better, but clank around a bit inside the machine.

 

Again, this is only another trouble shooting step you could try. While there are plenty of articles on how to do this yourself manually, if you're not technically inclined, have a pro or your kids do it for you as there is always a risk when opening up your equipment such as voiding the warranty.

 

Thanks,

 

Jon

 

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Hello. What a disappointment this is!

I just bought the "EASY VHS to DVD" specifically to transfer old VHS tapes to DVD.

But I get Signal Protected errors infrequently, but enough to make the process almost impossible, and certainly not automated (ie, without me sitting and babysitting and waiting for an error to pop up so that I don't lose video after the error.)

 

I didn't buy the product directly from eRoxio, so I cannot return it.

 

Even if the VHS tapes are of low quality, the SOFTWARE should be able to have its "tolerance" adjusted so that these VHS signals are ignored if they are coming, especially at random intervals from non-copy protected software. I don't understand why the tolerance of the software cannot be adjusted.

 

Keep this post going and the ideas coming. Maybe together we can work out a REASONABLE work-around!

Edited by chicago chic

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It's not a software error unfortunately

 

For many years now VCRs have had that built in in the form of an electronic circuit (at the behest of the studio accountants) to prevent copying of commercial tapes

 

Unfortunately a degraded tape will trigger this circuit causing the problem, especially if it's a lower quality EP one

 

 

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It's not a software error unfortunately

 

For many years now VCRs have had that built in in the form of an electronic circuit (at the behest of the studio accountants) to prevent copying of commercial tapes

 

Unfortunately a degraded tape will trigger this circuit causing the problem, especially if it's a lower quality EP one

 

 

A VCR with this (electronic circuit) has nothing to do with play (output), just prevents copy from protected source/tape (input) into a VCR with the (electronic circuit).

 

chicago chic,

 

Is not trying to capture a worn out tape (input) into a VCR.

 

cd

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The point tho CD is that the circuitry is built into every input chip, including the one in the gubbins and there's no way software tolerances can counteract that.

 

It's an issue that has been known for years - as I've said before, the only machines able to overcome that are the very old mechanical switched ones - the 'blocking' started when touch controls and microprocessor circuitry was introduced way back in the 80s

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