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Excessive File Size


Einstein

Question

I was wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to capture old VHS and burn it on to DVD. Most of the VHSs are over an hour long. When I initially saved it to the hard disc, 1h equated to approximately 15Gb of file, somewhat too large to fit on a DVD.

 

On running the stored file in Windows Media Player, both the picture and sound were iffy to say the least. The sounds kept cutting out and the picture stuttered/froze. After stopping the video capture, viewing the video input on the window viewer in the software indicated no problem with it.

 

I'm running a Thinkpad T42 and it meets the minimum spec required.

 

I'd be grateful on any solutions to these two problems.

 

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I was wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to capture old VHS and burn it on to DVD. Most of the VHSs are over an hour long. When I initially saved it to the hard disc, 1h equated to approximately 15Gb of file, somewhat too large to fit on a DVD.

 

On running the stored file in Windows Media Player, both the picture and sound were iffy to say the least. The sounds kept cutting out and the picture stuttered/froze. After stopping the video capture, viewing the video input on the window viewer in the software indicated no problem with it.

 

I'm running a Thinkpad T42 and it meets the minimum spec required.

 

I'd be grateful on any solutions to these two problems.

 

Actually there is no problem regarding the file size. That 15GB file size you consider excessive is about exactly what you should get when capturing 1 hour of video to the avi format. When you burn the video to a DVD it will be encoded to mpeg and compressed to fit on the DVD. When you talk about creating video DVDs you should forget about file sizes. Its the time legnth of the video that is important: 1hour of video per 4.7GB DVD at best quality. You can cget up to 2 hours of video on a DVD but at much lower quality.

 

As to the quality that you got that depends a great deal on your computer system. The minimum specs you mentioned are a joke. What are your system specs., especially graphics card/adaptor? How are you connecting your source VHS to your PC?

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Video Card Chip Type ATI MOBILITY RADEON 7500 AGP (0x4C57)

Video Card Memory 32.00 MB

Video Card BIOS BK5.0.0 VR006.009.007.007.002.001.001.001 j

Driver c:\windows\system32\drivers\ati2mtag.sys

Version 6.14.10.6547, 2-6-2007

 

 

Actually there is no problem regarding the file size. That 15GB file size you consider excessive is about exactly what you should get when capturing 1 hour of video to the avi format. When you burn the video to a DVD it will be encoded to mpeg and compressed to fit on the DVD. When you talk about creating video DVDs you should forget about file sizes. Its the time legnth of the video that is important: 1hour of video per 4.7GB DVD at best quality. You can cget up to 2 hours of video on a DVD but at much lower quality.

 

As to the quality that you got that depends a great deal on your computer system. The minimum specs you mentioned are a joke. What are your system specs., especially graphics card/adaptor? How are you connecting your source VHS to your PC?

 

 

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Video Card Chip Type ATI MOBILITY RADEON 7500 AGP (0x4C57)

Video Card Memory 32.00 MB

Video Card BIOS BK5.0.0 VR006.009.007.007.002.001.001.001 j

Driver c:\windows\system32\drivers\ati2mtag.sys

Version 6.14.10.6547, 2-6-2007

 

 

name='myguggi' date='Jan 30 2009, 02:06 PM' post='254208']

Actually there is no problem regarding the file size. That 15GB file size you consider excessive is about exactly what you should get when capturing 1 hour of video to the avi format. When you burn the video to a DVD it will be encoded to mpeg and compressed to fit on the DVD. When you talk about creating video DVDs you should forget about file sizes. Its the time legnth of the video that is important: 1hour of video per 4.7GB DVD at best quality. You can cget up to 2 hours of video on a DVD but at much lower quality.

 

As to the quality that you got that depends a great deal on your computer system. The minimum specs you mentioned are a joke. What are your system specs., especially graphics card/adaptor? How are you connecting your source VHS to your PC?

 

 

 

To quote somebodys post, click on the Reply button and type below the quote.

 

Your Thinkpad is just not good enough for any video work.Sorry :(

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I was wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to capture old VHS and burn it on to DVD. Most of the VHSs are over an hour long. When I initially saved it to the hard disc, 1h equated to approximately 15Gb of file, somewhat too large to fit on a DVD.

 

On running the stored file in Windows Media Player, both the picture and sound were iffy to say the least. The sounds kept cutting out and the picture stuttered/froze. After stopping the video capture, viewing the video input on the window viewer in the software indicated no problem with it.

 

I'm running a Thinkpad T42 and it meets the minimum spec required.

 

I'd be grateful on any solutions to these two problems.

 

Technology-wise, that Thinkpad is ancient, and probably doesn't have the horses to run the software, especially if Windows Media Player can't even play the files without problems.

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Many thanks for this. The PC is a standard IBM Thinkpad T42, 2374-E80. It's a 1.5Gb processor with 1Gb memory. I'm not sure how to find what the graphics card is but the pc spec is on this web page:

http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss...ocid=MIGR-57839

 

We've recently got wifi at home. Could this have an impact on the data capture? Should I disconnect the connection when doing this sort of task?

 

Forgot to add that I'm using Roxio's 2861 Video Capture USB adaptor and connecting to the VHS via Scart convertor and video leads.

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