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Spanning Data Over Multiple Dvds


IT_user

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Hi all,

 

As a user of Roxio Toast on my mac, enjoy burning large data to multiple DVD by using the spanning feature.

 

The beauty of the Toast spanning is that the data is in its original form in a folder on the DVD and doesn't require

Toast to retrieve it or access it.

 

Can someone tell me if Creator 2009 DOES THE SAME. I would like to use Creator 2009 on my win2003 desktop to

burner large amounts of archived data, BUT not have it "encapsulated" the data on the DVDs, (ie as NERO BackItUp does)

therefore requiring the application to access the data.

 

Hope someone can help.

 

regards. IT_user

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No PC made that can do that…

 

Actually I don't see how that is possible on any OS???

 

Optical media is burned/read using international standards. The OS you are using to make it is not relevant to the standards so one OS cannot do something that another OS cannot.

 

I think that what you are seeing on your MAC is something that is in the OS so while it is doing the same thing, it isn't visible to you.

 

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Thank you for your reply, if I put the DVD burnt with Toast on a mac into a PC, and OPEN the DVD there is a folder containing a portion of the overall data burnt over several DVDs.

 

That portion is "seen" as it was in its original form on the HDD, in the same folder structure, and if I use the PC search on the DVD requesting a particular file/folder it can be found, as long as that file/folder is in that "portion" of the burnt data. Therefore the file/folder can be retrieved from the DVD.

 

Does Creator 2009 do the same, if I write a large amount of data "spanned" over several DVDs, and then on another PC open one of the DVDs, can I copy data without having Creator 2009 installed on that PC.

 

Thank you.

If you take a single 12gb file and write it to DVDs, there is no operating system in the world that can put those 3 disc files back together…

 

There has to be a proprietary program included with the disc to do that. If the split file will restore on a PC it is only because a PC version of the recovery program was included on the disc.

 

In the end that is the only way it works. No magic here, Apple doesn't know some secret way of burning discs… But MAC's tend to hide the inner workings from users so you just haven't realized what is going on. ;)

 

Yes Creator Classic will do the same thing but heed the warnings Daithi listed. You may be all happy now, but when the disc spanning fails you will look at it differently. :(

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No PC made that can do that…

 

Actually I don't see how that is possible on any OS???

 

Optical media is burned/read using international standards. The OS you are using to make it is not relevant to the standards so one OS cannot do something that another OS cannot.

 

I think that what you are seeing on your MAC is something that is in the OS so while it is doing the same thing, it isn't visible to you.

 

 

 

Thank you for your reply, if I put the DVD burnt with Toast on a mac into a PC, and OPEN the DVD there is a folder containing a portion of the overall data burnt over several DVDs.

 

That portion is "seen" as it was in its original form on the HDD, in the same folder structure, and if I use the PC search on the DVD requesting a particular file/folder it can be found, as long as that file/folder is in that "portion" of the burnt data. Therefore the file/folder can be retrieved from the DVD.

 

Does Creator 2009 do the same, if I write a large amount of data "spanned" over several DVDs, and then on another PC open one of the DVDs, can I copy data without having Creator 2009 installed on that PC.

 

Thank you.

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To me that sounds as if Toast is splitting the data into media size chunks before burning otherwise it wouldn't be readable.

 

Spanned backup doesn't work that way - it does, as you point out, encode the data into one file which it writes over several discs. Unfiortunately, that has a very nasty habit of coming apart at the seams as, if one disc in the set is faulty, the whole set is unusable.

 

What you could to to emulate the behaviour of Toast is to manually split the data and write each segment to a separate disc

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