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Solve Problems on Blu-ray Disc Production


cdanteek

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http://www.prweb.com/releases/2006/4/prweb377427.htm

 

 

U.S. Firm Finalizing Patents that Solve Problems on Blu-ray Disc Production Blue Ray Technologies Now Lowers Prices on its Hi-Def Discs

 

 

U.S. high-definition DVD disc company Blue Ray Technologies announces it has solved the production problems reportedly hampering the major overseas plants to make the imminent release of HD movies on Blu-ray discs both affordable and locally-made. The company is thereby lowering its prices for studios that want their movies made with the indie firm. List of Blu-ray movie titles from all sources follows.

 

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) April 27, 2006 -- U.S. high-definition DVD disc company Blue Ray Technologies announces it has solved the production problems reportedly hampering the major overseas plants to make the imminent release of HD movies on Blu-ray discs both affordable and locally-made.

 

In a David vs. Goliath situation, independent Blue Ray Technologies is in the final patent stages for key manufacturing processes related to the layering process of Hi-def Blu-ray movies and games that may be hampering the majors. The company is thereby lowering its prices for studios that want their movies made with the indie firm.

 

“We are finalizing the patents that will revolutionize the manufacturing process,” said company CEO and founder Erick Hansen. “We are hopefully going to beat the big companies in the world. That’s because they presently have such a high reject rate. It is said to be as high as 75 percent rejects while ours are lower than 20 percent.”

 

Hansen, a DVD manufacturing pioneer, further stated his company is getting into recordable Blu-ray discs for the time when those machines are ready for market. With a storage capacity of 50 gigabytes to 80Gb, they are expected to be a boon for computer users backing up hard drives, game-players or anyone using large files at work or home.

 

"From a PC end-user perspective, Blu-ray is a superior format. It offers 67-150% more storage capacity, higher transfer rates, slim-line notebook compatibility, broadband connectivity and a proven interactive layer with BD- Java," Hewlett Packard’s Maureen Weber told the media.

 

In addition, Hansen said Blue Ray Technologies (www.blueraygroup.com) would be an environmentally-friendly company and would not use potentially unsound practices such using as cyanide dyes as some others do, and recycling its high-grade excess plastic into cups, toys and safety products.

 

“We are also experimenting with paper discs inside the plastic coating and other things to bring this technology into the 21st century,” said Hansen.

 

Blue Ray Technologies previously announced it would be using a state-of-the-art RFID anti-piracy and anti-theft process directly on its discs. It is also the only U.S. indie plant, thus thwarting some overseas manufacturers that might make legit discs for studios by day and bootleg copies by night. “Plus we are creating jobs for Americans,” added Hansen.

 

Blu-ray (the generic name) has a rival format called HD-DVD. The first players from Toshiba were put on sale last week to mixed reviews. The Los Angeles Times (Apr. 20), as well as PCWorld and Cnet (Apr. 18) all had reservations about the machines. Blu-ray is expected to be an improvement, especially in capacity, and will rally behind the slogan "Beyond High Definition."

 

Any disc production snafus overseas (specifically in the area called “theoretical process window”) are not likely to stop the release of the 100 Blu-ray film titles expected to start sales this summer. Early disc production quotas will be fairly modest, as the Blu-ray player and a HD television are required. Yet it shouldn’t take long as HD TVs are already in many homes and a number of large retailers are taking pre-orders from customers now for the Sony Blu-ray players.

 

Here is a partial list of the first wave of movie titles to be released, according to the Blu-ray Disc Association:

 

Disney

Kill Bill: Vol. 1

Hero

Dark Water

Ladder 49

The Brothers Grimm

The Great Raid

Armageddon

Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back

Dinosaur

Everest

Paramount

Mission: Impossible 1, 2 and 3

Four Brothers

Sahara

Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

The Italian Job

Tomb Raider

U2: Rattle and Hum

Sleepy Hollow

Manchurian Candidate

Sony/MGM

The Fifth Element

Bram Stoker's Dracula

Desperado

For a Few Dollars More

The Guns of Navarone

Hitch

House of Flying Daggers

A Knight's Tale

Kung Fu Hustle

The Last Waltz

Legends of the Fall

Resident Evil Apocalypse

Robocop

Sense and Sensibility

Stealth

SWAT

XXX

Black Hawk Down

The Bridge on the River Kwai

Fox

Ice Age

Fantastic Four

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Behind Enemy Lines

Kiss of the Dragon

Warner Bros.

Batman Begins

Charlie and The Chocolate Factory

Constantine

The Dukes of Hazzard

The Last Samurai

Lethal Weapon

The Matrix

Million Dollar Baby

Oceans 12

Swordfish

Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines

Training Day

Troy

Twister

Unforgiven

Lionsgate

Lord of War

The Punisher

Saw

T2: Judgment Day

Reservoir Dogs

Total Recall

Dune

Rambo: First Blood

See No Evil

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I'm not sure I "get" Blu-ray.

Rather than go dig, you seem to be on top of it, so,

 

What does Joe Consumer do with it?

 

The item says B-r commercial movies (the list) will play in existing players, but in HD?

 

For Joe to get into this, does it mean a new HD camcorder, a new B-r recorder/player, and HDTV to see it?

 

Is this a new money-pit? (a worthwhile money pit?) :)

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Definitely a money pit... worthwhile? Only for individuals to answer. I watch alot of TV, but don't think it's worth the money to swtich to HD at the moment. When they start selling 36" HDTVs for the price of a regular TV is now, then I might. Anything over $500 just isn't worth it 'to me'. Then add to that the cost of HD programming!!

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I'm not sure I "get" Blu-ray.

Rather than go dig, you seem to be on top of it, so,

 

What does Joe Consumer do with it?

 

The item says B-r commercial movies (the list) will play in existing players, but in HD?

 

For Joe to get into this, does it mean a new HD camcorder, a new B-r recorder/player, and HDTV to see it?

 

Is this a new money-pit? (a worthwhile money pit?) :)

Joe Consumer is expected to choose one or the other.

 

Joe can also decide to continue using regular DVD (dash and/or plus).

 

Lynn

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I'm not sure I "get" Blu-ray.

Rather than go dig, you seem to be on top of it, so,

 

What does Joe Consumer do with it?

 

The item says B-r commercial movies (the list) will play in existing players, but in HD?

 

For Joe to get into this, does it mean a new HD camcorder, a new B-r recorder/player, and HDTV to see it?

 

Is this a new money-pit? (a worthwhile money pit?) :)

 

1. Wait for the price to come down.

 

2 Blue Disc or Blue Ray Disc is one new High Definition Format

HD is another High Definition Format. You need a HD DVD player for HD disc's.

You need a Blue Ray Disc DVD player for a Blue Ray Disc. Then you need a High

Definition TV to view them.

 

3 Yes,Yes,Yes,Yes

 

4 Yes HD TV$1,800.00 up, Hd DVD Player $500.00, Blue Ray Disc DVD Player $750.00, Optical Drive for computer $1,000.00, HD or BRD Blank Media $30.00 to $50.00 each, HD or BRD bought DVD Movie Title $29.00.

 

5. Worthwhile ? Its better but way to expensive now.

My first DVD Burner was $340.00 and the my first Phillips CD Burner was more. Now there $40.00 and better.

I did do the HD TV a year ago but pricey. I do get HD cable programs and over the air HD TV.

 

cdanteek

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Joe Consumer is expected to choose one or the other.

 

Joe can also decide to continue using regular DVD (dash and/or plus).

 

Lynn

 

Joe always has a choice. I still own (but rarely watch) VHS. I still own (but rarely listen to) tape and LP.

Joe won't have any choice though when HD gets broadcasted over the airways and needs HDTV. I heard long ago that there would be a "box" to decode to "regular" tv for those not willing to spend thousands on a new set. Anyone know anything about it? Personally I don't think a tv is worth that much cash.

 

Joe can just wait though...remember the price of VHS players, DVD players, etc. when they all first came out? Prices drop. But, by then they'll have invented the next lastest and greatest "must have"! lol

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This "Joe" wouldn't buy HD-TV even if the price came down to $500. I have seen HD on a couple of TV's and as far as I'm concerned, I really couldn't tell that much difference between that and my regular TV. BTW, I have seen many TV programs where it is advertised that it is being broadcast in HD-, so they are already doing that and so far all TV's that I know of can still watch the regular type broadcast. I have heard nothing about the day coming when you will not be able to watch TV unless you have a HD TV. When that day comes , and it will have to be several years from now, I will have a big problem buying one, as I just purchased a new TV set a month ago and it's not HD :)

 

Frank.....

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This "Joe" wouldn't buy HD-TV even if the price came down to $500. I have seen HD on a couple of TV's and as far as I'm concerned, I really couldn't tell that much difference between that and my regular TV. BTW, I have seen many TV programs where it is advertised that it is being broadcast in HD-, so they are already doing that and so far all TV's that I know of can still watch the regular type broadcast. I have heard nothing about the day coming when you will not be able to watch TV unless you have a HD TV. When that day comes , and it will have to be several years from now, I will have a big problem buying one, as I just purchased a new TV set a month ago and it's not HD :)

 

Frank.....

Personally I just can't stand the aspect ratio. Sure, the tv may be 4 feet wide but there's no height! I guess that's why they have to be 4 feet wide..lol. I don't see much difference either, even though it's got almost three times the lines per inch of regular tv. I think it alot like printing beyond 300 dots per inch. The human eye just can't see it and it's a waste. Ooh...I'm gonna get flack for that one. Ok, I admit I can see a little difference but it just isn't worth it to me. I'm sure it is to others but the point here it's being thrust on us.

I remember years ago that it was coming out cause the consumer was demanding better tv. I wasn't one that was asking to spend thousands on a box....I'd like to meet someone who did.

Well, as far as the U.S. programming goes, it's legislated to change to broadcast HDV on Feb. 17, 2009. That's the latest info I found...thought it was sooner. In Canada, they've yet to peg a date. To help with the transition years in the meantime and following '09, we can get set top boxes that convert the DTV to NTSC. Most likely, plain old signals we're used to in Canada will be broadcast along with DTV for years after '09 but what does it matter if you grab a station from the U.S. that's DTV? Gonna have to get a box. And don't forget the satellite or cable bill going up. Oh, and you'll need that surround sound too. I've ranted enough..sorry folks

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This "Joe" wouldn't buy HD-TV even if the price came down to $500. I have seen HD on a couple of TV's and as far as I'm concerned, I really couldn't tell that much difference between that and my regular TV.

 

"Personally I just can't stand the aspect ratio. Sure, the tv may be 4 feet wide but there's no height!"

 

 

Most older TV's you don't even see how good DVD is today. Try turning on your progressive scan. Not enough resolution to get to 720x480.

Wide screen format (16.9) is what movies are and have been filmed in for years. The disclaimer Reformatted to fit your TV.

It is different but you have always watched squished down 16.9 to 4.3 on any movie until 16.9 VHS and DVD's started showing up.

I see a big difference on my HD 1080i,720p,480p and 480i wide screen format TV. Yes a 6.1 or 7.1 surround sound system compliments the experience. It really is a home theater, look and sound.

It's just new and expensive, like PC's used to be in the infant years.

 

cdanteek

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I can see maybe watching movies on a 16:9 HDTV, but not broadcast TV. The Gov may force HDTV on us, but they can't make us watch it. What about those that can't afford the HD tuner box? There are plenty of low income households that watch over the air broadcasting and can not afford the conversion. I would say millions will be without TV completely.

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I can see maybe watching movies on a 16:9 HDTV, but not broadcast TV. The Gov may force HDTV on us, but they can't make us watch it. What about those that can't afford the HD tuner box? There are plenty of low income households that watch over the air broadcasting and can not afford the conversion. I would say millions will be without TV completely.

 

 

That's what I've always wondered about too...millions not able to afford to watch their favourite show or two.

It'll be up to the advertisers on these shows to make sure these boxes are affordable. They won't sell any soda pop if no one's watching their glib commercials.

I wonder what new and improved TV they'll be trying to convince us in the future we won't be able to live without; Three-D holographic programming that puts you in the middle of the movie? Duck when they shoot at the bad guys...lol

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I can see maybe watching movies on a 16:9 HDTV, but not broadcast TV. The Gov may force HDTV on us, but they can't make us watch it. What about those that can't afford the HD tuner box? There are plenty of low income households that watch over the air broadcasting and can not afford the conversion. I would say millions will be without TV completely.

Well, from what I've been able to find, it's a bit under 3 years till that day arrives.

 

"TV stations serving all markets in the United States are airing digital television programming today, although most will continue to provide analog programming through February 17, 2009. At that point, full-power TV stations will cease broadcasting on their current analog channels, and the spectrum they use for analog broadcasting will be reclaimed and put to other uses."

 

That's from a page at the FCC's site, here.

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TV and I went our separate ways decades ago.

 

There IS life without TV.

 

In fact, the ratings these days, compared with ratings in, say, the 80's, show a lot of people have discovered that. Not all of the drop-off has to do with cable - there's also Videogames, DVDs, the internet, etc.

 

Or, there's what I did with "all that time" before encountering the internet - be a community activist.

 

Lynn

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