Jump to content

CD-RWs won't eject


lttony

Recommended Posts

I use Roxio EasyCD Creator 5.35.10 (no dvd) on a Win98 desktop and a

WinXP laptop. Nearly always I am unable to eject any brand of CD-RWs

from either computer(1-4x). Not from the screen nor the button on the

tower. I rarely use RWs, so I'm not familiar at all with them, but most were

burned a couple years ago.

 

Why can't I get them to eject? (The only way I can do it now is reboot, then

punch the open tray button when the drive's light starts blinking on start-up.)

Thanks,

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Roxio EasyCD Creator 5.35.10 (no dvd) on a Win98 desktop and a

WinXP laptop. Nearly always I am unable to eject any brand of CD-RWs

from either computer(1-4x). Not from the screen nor the button on the

tower. I rarely use RWs, so I'm not familiar at all with them, but most were

burned a couple years ago.

 

Why can't I get them to eject? (The only way I can do it now is reboot, then

punch the open tray button when the drive's light starts blinking on start-up.)

Thanks,

Jim

CD-RWs are designed to be used temporarily, erased, and re-used. They are good for testing. Beyond that, they are best used to PERMANTLY LOSE the data, which is probably what is happening.

 

It sounds like the re-crystalized aluminum alloy of the CD-RW is well along on the way to de-crystalizing.

 

Can you even read any of the files anymore? If so, I'd suggest you move them to the saftey of the Hard Drive long enough to burn them correctly - with DataProject onto CD-R.

 

(I hope you didn't compound the problem by formatting the CD-RW, which seems to speed up the disappearance of the data.)

 

Lynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Roxio EasyCD Creator 5.35.10 (no dvd) on a Win98 desktop and a

WinXP laptop. Nearly always I am unable to eject any brand of CD-RWs

from either computer(1-4x). Not from the screen nor the button on the

tower. I rarely use RWs, so I'm not familiar at all with them, but most were

burned a couple years ago.

 

Why can't I get them to eject? (The only way I can do it now is reboot, then

punch the open tray button when the drive's light starts blinking on start-up.)

Thanks,

Jim

 

If you made them years ago, you probably have forgotton what program you used to make them.

There are two ways to make a cd with ECDC 5, one is to use DataCD Project and the other is Direct CD.

It sounds like these old cd's were made with Direct CD, so the following may help you:

 

From an earlier post:

 

You have to eject the disc using Direct CD by right clicking on the Direct CD icon in the system tray and select eject. Or, open Direct CD and select eject. You have to eject the disc from Direct CD so that Direct CD can complete the writting process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CD-RWs are designed to be used temporarily, erased, and re-used. They are good for testing. Beyond that, they are best used to PERMANTLY LOSE the data, which is probably what is happening.

 

It sounds like the re-crystalized aluminum alloy of the CD-RW is well along on the way to de-crystalizing.

 

Can you even read any of the files anymore? If so, I'd suggest you move them to the saftey of the Hard Drive long enough to burn them correctly - with DataProject onto CD-R.

 

(I hope you didn't compound the problem by formatting the CD-RW, which seems to speed up the disappearance of the data.)

 

Lynn

 

Thanks, Lynn. I am always grateful to get a reply. You provide some good advice: I will transfer to CD-Rs. I did format the RWs. But some are only at least one that won't eject is only about a month old. See my reply to odgens below.

 

Jim

 

 

 

If you made them years ago, you probably have forgotton what program you used to make them.

There are two ways to make a cd with ECDC 5, one is to use DataCD Project and the other is Direct CD.

It sounds like these old cd's were made with Direct CD, so the following may help you:

 

From an earlier post:

 

You have to eject the disc using Direct CD by right clicking on the Direct CD icon in the system tray and select eject. Or, open Direct CD and select eject. You have to eject the disc from Direct CD so that Direct CD can complete the writting process.

 

I'm virtually certain I used DirectCD on all of them. I was unaware, in fact, that I could use DataCD with RWs. I'm optimistic that your suggestion is the solution. When I get home I will use DirectCD to see if I can eject them. Since I use that application so infrequently, I'm uncertain of all the steps I took to end the burn (i.e. I don't recall if I closed the disc entirely or closed the session or what). Thanks much for the help.

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Lynn. I am always grateful to get a reply. You provide some good advice: I will transfer to CD-Rs. I did format the RWs.

 

I'm virtually certain I used DirectCD on all of them. I was unaware, in fact, that I could use DataCD with RWs. I'm optimistic that your suggestion is the solution. When I get home I will use DirectCD to see if I can eject them. Since I use that application so infrequently, I'm uncertain of all the steps I took to end the burn (i.e. I don't recall if I closed the disc entirely or closed the session or what). Thanks much for the help.

 

Jim

from FREQUENT ANSWERS (pinned to the top of the board):

 

Formatting CD-R or CD-RW discs: If you format the disc, it is formated with DirectCD, and will only work with DirectCD. It will call up DirectCD evry time you put it in. It's what I call "Basic False Analogy" - you format the floppy, then use the floppy - therefore you format the CD-R or CD-RW, then use the CD-R or CD-RW. For all the other programs within the suite (the ones which are better for keeping your data long-term), use a BLANK blank disc, directly out of the package or off the spindle.

 

DirectCD: "Never trust your ONLY copy of an important file to a Packet-Written Program, like DirectCD, Drag-to-Disc, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc. Packet-Written discs tend to fail, usually at the worst possible time." DirectCD is NOT a good choice for system backup. If you are moving a COPY of a file from one computer to another, it's a fine tool.

 

CD-RWs are a fine tool, but not a long-term tool. The same quality that enables them to be re-written will cause them to fade to blank over time. They can still be re-used, but eventually not even an ISO based program will retrieve them. There is no hard-and-fast rule as to how long they will last, but the more critical the situation the more you should worry about this.

 

There are three kinds of CD-RW media

  • standard (1-4x)
  • "high-speed" (4-10x or 4-12x)
  • "ultra-speed" (10x or 12x and up)

There is different technology behind each of the three forms of CD-RW, and they are not compatable. If your burner's middle number is 4x or lower, it will only use standard; up to 10 or 12, it can use standard and "high-speed" RW's higher than that, it can use "high-speed" and "ultra-speed", and possibly standard.

 

(To check what your burner can use, open any project, like MusicProject or DataProject, click on "Tools", click on "CD Drive Properties", click on the drive you want to check, and there is a drop-down box for "supported media". It will list CD-RW, CD-RW (High Speed), and CD-RW (Ultra Speed) seperately.)

 

"Missing Files": If you have "missing files" when using DirectCD or a CD-RW, consider an ISO based program such as cdroller (www.cdroller.com) or ISOBuster (www.isobuster.com). Both have impressive testimonials on their websites and in the Roxio boards. Both now have "trial" versions, which let you see if anything can be recovered before you have to pay - you odds are better with CD-R than CD-RW.

 

Lynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...