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no sound - again


caroldhughes

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OK - maybe this isn't something you can help with - but maybe you can. In the past I had problems with hearing what I am recording from LP - turned out to be a loose connection in the back of my computer. Was using it last night - no problem but today, no sound again. I have checked all the connections - plugged and unplugged everything. The turntable appears to be working - when I chose "record mode" I can record and playback what I've recorded. I just can't hear anything played from the turntable. I can hear discs inserted into the appropriate drive. I have gone to the control panel - sounds and audio devices - none of the items has "mute" selected. (see I did learn something from our last discussion!) Any suggestions? My computer is about 1 1/2 years old - I have SoundMax Integrated Audio sound card.

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I agree Dave,it's got to be a problem on the play settings.Is line-in muted in the play section of the mixer,not the record section?This would let the cd be played and Windows sounds be heard but not monitoring of the record process.

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Think of it as a component turntable, but I believe this one has it's own preamp built in for RIAA equalization and to give a line level signal. Any "normal" component turntable is "no good" by itself. It has no speakers and requires an appropriate preamp, amp, and speakers. Well, this one is designed to give a line-level output so it can be plugged into an "Aux" or "Tape" input of a receiver/amplifier, or, in this case, into the line-in input of a sound card. So, it's appropriate for this application.

 

It was suggested above to look at the "Recording" properties, but I wonder if somehow the "Playback" properties may have been muted.

 

Do you hear any sound if you play the burned CD back on your PC? Do you get any other Windows sounds through your speakers?

RIGHT.

 

Years ago I had a turntable that worked just fine, but to do more than hear it directly from the needle, I had to plug the jack into the back of my radio.

 

(Yes. Radio. YEARS ago.)

 

Lynn

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I have two separate turn tables Dave and one has it's own amp and speakers and the other one is as you described as needing to be plugged into a receiver that had an Amp which in turn had a set of speakers. I am still curious of what make and model of turn table the OP has, that has no speakers and no Amp and can be just pludded into a line-in port on a computer. Never heard of such an animal but I also would never choose that method of recording audio to my computer.

 

If the audio can't be heard after recording on Windows Media Player then I would have to agree that a recording setting is not right. On the other hand I can't figure out how she is getting any sound at all based on what I have read so far. Especially when she suggests that she can "play what was recorded back" but with no audio sound.

 

Frank....

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I have two separate turn tables Dave and one has it's own amp and speakers and the other one is as you described as needing to be plugged into a receiver that had an Amp which in turn had a set of speakers. I am still curious of what make and model of turn table the OP has, that has no speakers and no Amp and can be just pludded into a line-in port on a computer. Never heard of such an animal but I also would never choose that method of recording audio to my computer.

 

If the audio can't be heard after recording on Windows Media Player then I would have to agree that a recording setting is not right. On the other hand I can't figure out how she is getting any sound at all based on what I have read so far. Especially when she suggests that she can "play what was recorded back" but with no audio sound.

 

Frank....

OP can hear the audio on the CD after it has been burned - when did WinPlayer get into this, anyway? - but can't hear it during the burn (checking as it goes).

 

('Course, I remember a setup on reel to reel that had two heads, so you could hear it and be erasing it at the same time - useful for things like echos, but dangerous just the same.)

 

Lynn

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I have two separate turn tables Dave and one has it's own amp and speakers and the other one is as you described as needing to be plugged into a receiver that had an Amp which in turn had a set of speakers. I am still curious of what make and model of turn table the OP has, that has no speakers and no Amp and can be just pludded into a line-in port on a computer. Never heard of such an animal but I also would never choose that method of recording audio to my computer.

 

If the audio can't be heard after recording on Windows Media Player then I would have to agree that a recording setting is not right. On the other hand I can't figure out how she is getting any sound at all based on what I have read so far. Especially when she suggests that she can "play what was recorded back" but with no audio sound.

 

Frank....

Actually I suspect such a beast is becoming more common as fewer receivers/amplifiers have "Phono" inputs. A quick google search found me this. Apparently at least Teac makes such a turntable.

 

Neither of my turntables have an amp or speakers. One is a belt-drive Pioneer, linear tracking turntable, and the other is my direct drive Accutrac 2000. The Accutrac goes to a preamp powered off the game port on my PC, which in turn goes into the sound card. (Nice little preamp, with selectable capacitance loading.) The Pioneer is plugged into a JVC receiver. (All equipment is at least 19 years old. The Accutrac is almost 27 years old.)

 

So, the only difference between the OP's setup and mine is that I have a separate preamp. Works for me!

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caroldhughes

 

Did you find the sound problem?

No - as I can see that there is some confusion about my setup - let me explain. We have a tuner, CD, DVD, VHS, turntable, etc. in one room (and someone mentioned a TEAC - my husband who is "older" brought one of those back from the Phillipines (on his way back from Viet Nam - I vividly remember a reel-to-reel recording that someone made of the shelling of the barracks that he was sleeping in - he was in A-4 [(?) then later A-6's B/N - east coast - (VA-42, VA 176., VA-75, VA-85) for those of you who understand the jargon]. Anyway - we have that set up in one room - and then there is my computer area - and as I had said that I would record his LP's to CD's - I bought a turntable from Radio Shack that has a pre-amp as a part of the deal. I have a "wire/cable" thing that has two wires that come out of the turntable - and plugs that are then inserted into a plug that is dual as it feeds in - and then has a single pin that inserts into the "line in" of my computer. I did learn from tbwrest and d_deweywright that I could not use the "mic" line - and I have been using the "line in" since then and have had no problems - until last week. I was successfully recording LP to CD (while listening to the LP) one day - and then the next day - I wasn't able to listen as I recorded. I guess that I am concerned that I have an inexpensive turntable (about $100.00) and maybe it died. It isn't like it has been used day in and day out - I would estimate that the total time in use is maybe a month - and this is the only use that it gets..... I can record (I see the fluctuations in the wave length) and play back - but I just can't hear. And as some of the LP's show 4 tracks as you look at them - but the literature says that there are 5 tracks - I would prefer to listen to it as it records - to ascertain where the track breaks really should be.

 

I am confident that between all the computer brains out there you can figure out what is wrong. I await your wisdom.....

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No - as I can see that there is some confusion about my setup - let me explain. We have a tuner, CD, DVD, VHS, turntable, etc. in one room (and someone mentioned a TEAC - my husband who is "older" brought one of those back from the Phillipines (on his way back from Viet Nam - I vividly remember a reel-to-reel recording that someone made of the shelling of the barracks that he was sleeping in - he was in A-4 [(?) then later A-6's B/N - east coast - (VA-42, VA 176., VA-75, VA-85) for those of you who understand the jargon]. Anyway - we have that set up in one room - and then there is my computer area - and as I had said that I would record his LP's to CD's - I bought a turntable from Radio Shack that has a pre-amp as a part of the deal. I have a "wire/cable" thing that has two wires that come out of the turntable - and plugs that are then inserted into a plug that is dual as it feeds in - and then has a single pin that inserts into the "line in" of my computer. I did learn from tbwrest and d_deweywright that I could not use the "mic" line - and I have been using the "line in" since then and have had no problems - until last week. I was successfully recording LP to CD (while listening to the LP) one day - and then the next day - I wasn't able to listen as I recorded. I guess that I am concerned that I have an inexpensive turntable (about $100.00) and maybe it died. It isn't like it has been used day in and day out - I would estimate that the total time in use is maybe a month - and this is the only use that it gets..... I can record (I see the fluctuations in the wave length) and play back - but I just can't hear. And as some of the LP's show 4 tracks as you look at them - but the literature says that there are 5 tracks - I would prefer to listen to it as it records - to ascertain where the track breaks really should be.

 

I am confident that between all the computer brains out there you can figure out what is wrong. I await your wisdom.....

Well, I don't feel confused about your setup. From what you've said, even though you can't hear while you're recording, you do get an indication that a signal is being recorded, which tentatively would indicate that the turntable and it's preamp are working.

 

Now, there were some other questions to you woven into the conversation:

 

Do you hear any "normal" Windows sounds from your speakers?

 

If you play a CD, do you get any sound out of your speakers?

 

You said you checked the "Record" settings in the mixer, but have you also checked the "Playback" settings?

 

If you use EMC to write a CD of the files you couldn't hear while you were recording, and play the CD back on your stereo, is there sound on the CD? (Even if you don't split the songs out, go ahead and write an Audio CD, they're not that expensive and we need the diagnostic information.)

 

Let us know!

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No - as I can see that there is some confusion about my setup - let me explain. We have a tuner, CD, DVD, VHS, turntable, etc. in one room (and someone mentioned a TEAC - my husband who is "older" brought one of those back from the Phillipines (on his way back from Viet Nam - I vividly remember a reel-to-reel recording that someone made of the shelling of the barracks that he was sleeping in - he was in A-4 [(?) then later A-6's B/N - east coast - (VA-42, VA 176., VA-75, VA-85) for those of you who understand the jargon]. Anyway - we have that set up in one room - and then there is my computer area - and as I had said that I would record his LP's to CD's - I bought a turntable from Radio Shack that has a pre-amp as a part of the deal. I have a "wire/cable" thing that has two wires that come out of the turntable - and plugs that are then inserted into a plug that is dual as it feeds in - and then has a single pin that inserts into the "line in" of my computer. I did learn from tbwrest and d_deweywright that I could not use the "mic" line - and I have been using the "line in" since then and have had no problems - until last week. I was successfully recording LP to CD (while listening to the LP) one day - and then the next day - I wasn't able to listen as I recorded. I guess that I am concerned that I have an inexpensive turntable (about $100.00) and maybe it died. It isn't like it has been used day in and day out - I would estimate that the total time in use is maybe a month - and this is the only use that it gets..... I can record (I see the fluctuations in the wave length) and play back - but I just can't hear. And as some of the LP's show 4 tracks as you look at them - but the literature says that there are 5 tracks - I would prefer to listen to it as it records - to ascertain where the track breaks really should be.

 

I am confident that between all the computer brains out there you can figure out what is wrong. I await your wisdom.....

 

 

If you can see the fluctuations in the signal it would appear that you have got everything hooked up correctly.

 

 

Please double check your Volume controls (again).

 

The following may help you to verify they are correct:

 

There is a difference between which inputs are made available to the soundcard's output, and which one is made available for recording.

Open up the Windows Volume Control utility. (This is usually available by double-clicking the little yellow icon of a loudspeaker in the system tray. If it's not there, go via Start|Programs|Accessories|Multimedia, or perhaps Start|Progams|Accessories|Entertainment). A screen titled "Volume Control" appears. On this screen you will see a selection of inputs. Each one can be individually switched on or off using its "mute" checkbox. All those which are not muted are available for playback through the soundcard's output, and their relative volumes can be controlled using the appropriate sliders. Thus, this screen behaves like a simple mixer, allowing multiple sources to be gathered together for output.

OK, all this is fine, and allows you to pass the input through to the output, but: it doesn't make the unmuted inputs available for recording to hard disk. To do this, select the "Properties" item from the "Options" menu. A screen titled "Properties" will appear. In the box titled "Adjust volume for", there are radio buttons: select the one for Recording. A list of available inputs appears in the box beneath "Show the following volume controls", and you should ensure that all the various inputs you may wish to record are checked in that list. Now press "OK", and the main screen's title changes to "Recording Control". This screen presents the inputs available for recording, and to activate the one you want, check its associated "Select" checkbox. The recording level can be adjusted using the selected input's volume slider; note that you can adjust this while recording (just like you can with the level control on a tape deck). You may also see a simple level meter (like the LEDs on a cassette deck) next to some inputs on some soundcards; whether they appear depends on the particular facilities provided by the soundcard's driver. However, this meter is uncalibrated and most hard disk recording packages are likely to have better metering. Once you have set the required record level, you can close down the Volume Control utility and the settings will remain unchanged (usually).

 

I assume you can put a music cd in your drive and you can hear it ok.

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I am wondering about Carol's statement "I have a "wire/cable" thing that has two wires that come out of the turntable and plugs that are then inserted into a plug that is dual as it feed in--and then has a single pin that inserts into the "lin-in" of my computer"

 

That sound almost exactly liker the cable set up that came with my Dazzle Digital Video Creator 150 program and unit. The two plugs coming out of the turn table are left and right audio cables and then the "dual" she talks about would be a splitter that also has two left and right audio cables and then the single cable that transmits the left and right audio sounds to her lin-in sound card. What I am not sure of is what she means when she says "that is dual as it feeds in". What is that "Feeds in" part ??? Feeds into what ? The rest of it I can understand.

 

Frank...

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OK - maybe this isn't something you can help with - but maybe you can. In the past I had problems with hearing what I am recording from LP - turned out to be a loose connection in the back of my computer. Was using it last night - no problem but today, no sound again. I have checked all the connections - plugged and unplugged everything. The turntable appears to be working - when I chose "record mode" I can record and playback what I've recorded. I just can't hear anything played from the turntable. I can hear discs inserted into the appropriate drive. I have gone to the control panel - sounds and audio devices - none of the items has "mute" selected. (see I did learn something from our last discussion!) Any suggestions? My computer is about 1 1/2 years old - I have SoundMax Integrated Audio sound card.

 

Open Volume Control, then under "Options" select "Properties", click "Recording" and insure that Line-In is checked. Click "OK" and you will see the volume controls for recording. Insure Line-In is selected (checked) as your recording device and set to a proper level

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I am wondering about Carol's statement "I have a "wire/cable" thing that has two wires that come out of the turntable and plugs that are then inserted into a plug that is dual as it feed in--and then has a single pin that inserts into the "lin-in" of my computer"

 

That sound almost exactly liker the cable set up that came with my Dazzle Digital Video Creator 150 program and unit. The two plugs coming out of the turn table are left and right audio cables and then the "dual" she talks about would be a splitter that also has two left and right audio cables and then the single cable that transmits the left and right audio sounds to her lin-in sound card. What I am not sure of is what she means when she says "that is dual as it feeds in". What is that "Feeds in" part ??? Feeds into what ? The rest of it I can understand.

 

Frank...

Frank, I suspect she is referring to the "normal" Y cable that goes from two RCA plugs at the turntable, to the part the "feeds in", the stereo 1/8" plug for the sound card. We know that she's got the right cabling because this has all worked in the past. (The issue then was getting it plugged into the line-in jack.)

 

At this point, we need to get clarification as to whether or not anything is coming out of the speakers at any time so we can rule out power issues to the speakers, and also know that they're still properly plugged in.

 

And since it appears that she can record, but not hear, she needs to look at the "Playback" controls in the mixer, not the "Record" controls.

 

At this point, it's back to Carol for more information.

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Well Dave, at least the TEAC you pointed to has a pre-amp. Somewhere along the line I thought that the OP's turn table had no pre-amp and/or speakers. And that was pretty strange to me. Most all turn tables you see no days at least have a couple of analog audio output ports, UNLESS--the turn table is a part of a system that has a receiver with it's own pre-amp that the turn table uses. I have a Pioneer Sterio set (Model PD-M450) that has all the necessary hardware including a couple of huge stand up speakers, that I used to use to record LP's, tapes etc. to my computer. It's still working but it's years old and except for the speakers,I don't use it any more.

 

Frank....

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I remember helping with this same problem for her not too long ago.I think it ended up being a wiring problem that time.I doubt that that's it this time though.I agree again Dave.It's possible that one of the settings got changed,either by acccident or another app as far as the playback volume or device is concerned.If she can make the cd then play it back then the turntable and pre-amp are ok.I wish I still had the SoundMax onboard sound enabled on this machine and I'd be able to see the mixer for maybe a better suggestion.

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I bought a Sony turntable last year for around $100.. It has an internal pre-amp so I can plug it directly into my computer to capture LPs. I know that I can turn the preamp on or off but since the OP can hear the recorded CD, seeing if it is turned on is not the solution.

 

I remember having a similar problem several years ago when the drivers on my audio card became corrupted. Did the original poster update their drivers for the audio card?

 

Well Dave, at least the TEAC you pointed to has a pre-amp. Somewhere along the line I thought that the OP's turn table had no pre-amp and/or speakers. And that was pretty strange to me. Most all turn tables you see no days at least have a couple of analog audio output ports, UNLESS--the turn table is a part of a system that has a receiver with it's own pre-amp that the turn table uses. I have a Pioneer Sterio set (Model PD-M450) that has all the necessary hardware including a couple of huge stand up speakers, that I used to use to record LP's, tapes etc. to my computer. It's still working but it's years old and except for the speakers,I don't use it any more.

 

Frank....

 

Is it possible that she has the audio wire plugged into the computer in the mic jack rather than the line in jack. She would be able to record from the mic and maybe even adjust the volume but if she has selected line-in, she will not hear the sound.

 

Open Volume Control, then under "Options" select "Properties", click "Recording" and insure that Line-In is checked. Click "OK" and you will see the volume controls for recording. Insure Line-In is selected (checked) as your recording device and set to a proper level
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Carol,check this.I re-enabled my onboard sound and I found this.Next to where you enable the line in for your record source there is a little button,click it and see if this box is checked if you have it.If it's checked,uncheck it.

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Carol,check this.I re-enabled my onboard sound and I found this.Next to where you enable the line in for your record source there is a little button,click it and see if this box is checked if you have it.If it's checked,uncheck it.

Good find there, Terry. That looks real promising.

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Not sure if the mixers are the same but if they are it might be there.Had to reload my onboard to find it.I just have to be careful to have my inputs and outputs right with 2 sound devices enabled...lol.

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Not sure if the mixers are the same but if they are it might be there.Had to reload my onboard to find it.I just have to be careful to have my inputs and outputs right with 2 sound devices enabled...lol.

I think a Vista Beta install automatically enabled my onboard sound and I had problems having both (onboard and dedicated) installed at the same time so you might look out for possible problems though I don't know how they might show up.

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OK - I found the problem. In EMC Sound Editor - there is a selection "Tools" The last selection is "Recording Source" - the microphone was selected - not line in. I don't understand how that could get changed - I use EMC to record the LP's - and then I use Real Player to actually burn the CD's. Could switching between programs reset the recording source?

 

In any case, it is working properly - and as usual - your persistance in making me check, check, re-check and then check some more works! I had been agonizing over this thing since last weekend - at least I can gt back to recording)

 

By the way what does re-enable onboard sound mean?

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OK - I found the problem. In EMC Sound Editor - there is a selection "Tools" The last selection is "Recording Source" - the microphone was selected - not line in. I don't understand how that could get changed - I use EMC to record the LP's - and then I use Real Player to actually burn the CD's. Could switching between programs reset the recording source?

 

In any case, it is working properly - and as usual - your persistance in making me check, check, re-check and then check some more works! I had been agonizing over this thing since last weekend - at least I can gt back to recording)

 

By the way what does re-enable onboard sound mean?

Many of us have a dedicated sound card in our systems and there are other systems, especially laptops, that have sound on their motherboards. Terry tried turning the motherboard version on which is set to off since he has a dedicated sound card.

 

Terry, I just remembered what problem I had with having both devices enabled at the same time....it caused 2 of my USB ports to stop working. These were the ones on the monitor. Weird!

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Open Volume Control, then under "Options" select "Properties", click "Recording" and insure that Line-In is checked. Click "OK" and you will see the volume controls for recording. Insure Line-In is selected (checked) as your recording device and set to a proper level

 

 

Line in is selected for both recording and playback - I reset the volume to its highest setting - still nothing.

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That's great Carol that you found what was causing your problem :) Wouldn't you know it would be some simple little option that was not checked or was checked wrong for what you were trying to do. There was a lot of discussion in regards to this particular post Carol and I think it just goes to show what dedicated people we have on these forums that will go to such great lengths to help a fellow user !!! Kudos to all of the repliers that helped along the way !! Good going :huh: And Terry, I really thought you had found the answer to the problem when you came up with that photo of an option that could have caused the problem.

 

Keep the group informed with how you are doing Carol. It's stuff like this that makes it all worth while.

 

Frank....

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