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Importing Photos


outerbank

Question

Has anyone ever experienced the following?

 

Just had some 35mm photos digitized. Within the software that was provided on the CD to view the images, the images are quite sharp. However, when I access the images with Media Manager, and then drag and drop them into VideoWave and then expand an image to carefully scrutinize it, the image is quite grainy. Wondering if the images will appear that way when viewed on a TV? I decided to print one of the images on 4x6 glossy photo paper from Media Manager to my Epson Photo R320 printer to determine if the printed photo would be as grainy as the expanded image. The printed photo was very good with no graininess at all (if that's a word). In fact, the print from the Epson looks better than the original print which was made directly from the negative. So my question is, even though the expanded digitized image appears grainy in VideoWave, will the final images be grainy when shown on a TV, or will the images be as good as the printed photo? I don't want to go through the lengthy creative process only to end up with sub-par images.

 

Thanks for any input.

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Here is what is strange. First of all, I had the photos scanned at Costco. This could have been a mistake. I have three different photo programs installed on my computer- Corel Paint Shop Pro X, Image Expert Premium, which was pre-installed on the computer, and Fuji Film Fine Pix Viewer, which was installed when I was using the Fuji digital camera. And of course, Roxio's Media Manager. I have since have switched to a Sony 10 megapixel camera. Corel Paint Shop renders the digitized photos just like the Costco program that is installed on the CD. The images are perfect. The other three programs render the photos in a grainy manner. I wonder if the difference is related to the scan rate that Costco uses to convert photos to digital? From the details the digital images are - 3087 x 2048 pixels, the dpi is 96, and the bit depth is 24.

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Lets talk about where you are seeing the lower resolution.

 

1) If you are viewing the images in Video Wave or making a slide show of the images, then you get the lower resolution.

2) If you are viewing the images in a image editing program, then they will be high resolution.

3) If you have Creator 2009, then you have PhotoSuite application. Look at the images there.

4) If you are making a video slide show with any program, then they will all be rendered to 720 by 480 since that is what standard definition is.

5) You could make a HD slide show using AVCHD using Creaqtor 2009 but you would need a Blu-ray player to play it.

6) Look at the DVD player's instruction manual to see if it will play a jpeg disc and what format is needed. You can put the photos on a jpeg disc just like what you alread have but it will play on a DVD plaer (manual advance).

 

I'm stillnot understanding where you have an issue.

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I believe I found the answer to my question at www.scantips.com/basics01.html. The scan resolution in dpi is important when the digital image is viewed on a monitor or TV screen. Dpi scan rate when printing an image is not so important. At this point I believe that the dpi of 96 that the 35mm negatives were scanned is too low. Intend to confirm after contacting the photo shop I normally have photos processed.

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I've learned that I am wrong about scanning rate. According to the person (professional) that processes my 35mm photos, a scan at 96dpi, with 3087x2048 pixels is a high quality scan, equal to what his scanning machine produces. He further believed that the grainy image is the result of VideoWave converting the image file to a lower resolution, which apparently is typical for such programs. He said that with some software programs (higher end) it's possible to adjust or eliminate the conversion. I have not found such a feature within VideoWave. I did find that when dragging the same image into MYDVD and then blowing up the image to a larger size, the image is not grainy but remains the same as the original image in terms of resolution. Evidently, MYDVD does not convert the image to a lower resolution. Sorry about the confusion.

 

Presumably, after assembling the images in VideoWave, adding whatever transitions are chosen and other features, and despite having grainy images in VideoWave, once the slideshow is imported into MYDVD, the end result should be okay.

 

Comments???

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I've learned that I am wrong about scanning rate. According to the person (professional) that processes my 35mm photos, a scan at 96dpi, with 3087x2048 pixels is a high quality scan, equal to what his scanning machine produces. He further believed that the grainy image is the result of VideoWave converting the image file to a lower resolution, which apparently is typical for such programs. He said that with some software programs (higher end) it's possible to adjust or eliminate the conversion. I have not found such a feature within VideoWave. I did find that when dragging the same image into MYDVD and then blowing up the image to a larger size, the image is not grainy but remains the same as the original image in terms of resolution. Evidently, MYDVD does not convert the image to a lower resolution. Sorry about the confusion.

 

Presumably, after assembling the images in VideoWave, adding whatever transitions are chosen and other features, and despite having grainy images in VideoWave, once the slideshow is imported into MYDVD, the end result should be okay.

 

Comments???

I think that is what I said in my first post???

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I've learned that I am wrong about scanning rate. According to the person (professional) that processes my 35mm photos, a scan at 96dpi, with 3087x2048 pixels is a high quality scan, equal to what his scanning machine produces.
Technically , you're both wrong. DPI AND resolution counts how and with what you are printing. Doesn't mean much for video work or images posted on the net.

 

Standard definition video is 720x480 and ALL images will be resized to that. Personally, I find an image editor is much better at resizing images than a video editor. I use a small Freeware app that was built to do that although PhotoSuite, PhotoShop or some other image editor will do a good job.

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To answer the question "What's my concern"? The digital images that I have down loaded from my two digital cameras remain very sharp when blown up (expanded) in VideoWave. They looked as good as the original postage stamp image. The digital images that were created from scanning 35mm negatives and then down loaded into the computer were somewhat grainy in their postage stamp size, but were terribly grainy when blown up in VideoWave. Consequently, I was concerned that the slide images would look grainy in the final product. I recognize that the slide images might not be the same quality as those produced from digital images directly down loaded from a digital camera, but I certainly was hoping the quality would be more than just acceptable. I now recognize that after assembling the slide show in VideoWave and then importing it to MYDVD, the images will be rendered at a 720x480 resolution, which does not seem to produce a grainy image, even when viewed on a TV screen.

 

Thanks for all of the help. The learning curve for this type of work appears to be lengthy. The expert individuals who participate on this forum are extraordinary in their patience and help.

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