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why are we burning DVDs ?


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Can anyone tell me why we're spending 100's of hours creating movies and burning them to DVD's? After mega hours of coaster burning frustration, I finally started having some success only to find out from one of my posts that DVD's will " fade away " rather quickly. What's worse is that I've been using DVD RWs which I've learned will fade away in months. I have VHS tapes from 25 yrs ago that are fine. So why are we burning DVDs ?

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As explained in the post you are referring to, it is the type of media that will determine how long it will last. If you are creating DVD's I would suggest using DVD -R or DVD +R media (depending on your DVD writer and player) Keep in mind as well the quality of the disc used can play a part in this as well. I would recommend staying with a quality brand name disc, check with your drive manufacturer to determine what will work best with your drive.

 

William

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You are probably burning DVDs to make it easier to play them (DVD players are quite common), and easier to share them (it's easier jmake a quality copy of a DVD than video).

 

If you want to use RW media, whether DVD or CD, you will discover the aluminum alloy that is recrystalized will de-crystalilze, and take all the data with it, fairly rapidly. R media is "burned" by "cooking" a dye with the laser, and is fairly stable - not quite as good as a commercial disc which has the lands and pits physically pressed into the metal, but still quite stable.

 

RW media has two primary uses, and a secondary use. The primary uses are for testing things (because you can erase and resuse it), and losing data. The secondary use is to transfer data between computers if you have no other options - and in this era of Flash drives (aka jump / pen / thumb / keychain drives), I'd recommend a flash drive for that.

 

(And you would do well to re-burn whatever is on those RW discs, if you can still read it.)

 

Lynn

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Thanks William and Lynn for the help! So if I stick to good quality + R or - R discs, they should last a while? I do realize that I need to keep the original files, but if I give a family home movie DVD as a gift, can I expect it will still play a few years down the road?

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Thanks William and Lynn for the help! So if I stick to good quality + R or - R discs, they should last a while? I do realize that I need to keep the original files, but if I give a family home movie DVD as a gift, can I expect it will still play a few years down the road?

Assuming we still have DVD players, I'd say probably so. Just be sure that whether you use plus or dash, the DVD player of the recepient will accept that. (Some players will only accept one or the other.)

 

On the other hand, RW discs, with their lesser reflectivity, may not ever play on some stand-alone DVD players.

 

A friend of mine in Germany sent me a DVD-R, and one friend can play it on their DVD player with no problem, another friend's DVD player can't read it at all. (I forget which is his and which is his brother's, but my friend and his brother each have a DVD burner, but since one is dash and the other is plus, they cannot exchange data via DVD - just DVD-player compatible Videos.)

 

Lynn

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