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PeterPan

A Way To Export Pieces Of Audio From Videowave

Question

The problem:

 

Well it was a problem for me anyway. Sometimes you may want to cut pieces out of a video and replace that part with with a photo right in the Video track, so you can make use of the Pan/zoom editor on it. Or, you may want to put a view from another camera into my overlay track, but maybe that second camera has very different EQ or sound (or maybe NO sound!). When does this matter? Well if the subject of the video contains something like a band playing that is part of the action (like a bride and groom dancing to a live band), then sonic changes or dropouts can really destroy the flow. In these and many other cases, it would be really nice if a copy of the native audio from part or all of production could be moved into the audio track. Then, provided you spend some time keeping your pieces in sync, the audio could play independently. Unfortunately, you can't export pieces of your video's native audio track, nor separate the audio and video from within Videowave.

 

The solution:

 

What you can do is run the Windows Sound recorder while the portion of the audio you want to export is playing in Videowave (or any video player for that matter). You may have to futz with your sound card mixer software, as well as the audio source and quality settings of the recorder to get things to work, but it is doable. Indeed, sound card resources are usually among the most sharable and simultaneously usable in a PC. Once things are set up and you've run a few tests, you can simply play the portion of the video or project where the audio is of interest to you. Then, simply click the RECORD button on the recorder maybe a second before the part you need. Pause/stop recording after the portion has gone by. When your done, save the recorded clip (it will be a WAV file), and remember to save it in your project folder so it won't get accidentally moved or lost. Finally, you can bring the audio file right in to the audio track of Videowave.

 

Synchronization is a little tricky. Temporarily keep both the audio from the original clip and the import enabled. This will let you drag the audio until the two are pretty well synchronized, and at that point you can disable the original audio.

Edited by PeterPan

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The problem:

 

Well it was a problem for me anyway. Sometimes you may want to cut pieces out of a video and replace that part with with a photo right in the Video track, so you can make use of the Pan/zoom editor on it. Or, you may want to put a view from another camera into my overlay track, but maybe that second camera has very different EQ or sound (or maybe NO sound!). When does this matter? Well if the subject of the video contains something like a band playing that is part of the action (like a bride and groom dancing to a live band), then sonic changes or dropouts can really destroy the flow. In these and many other cases, it would be really nice if a copy of the native audio from part or all of production could be moved into the audio track. Then, provided you spend some time keeping your pieces in sync, the audio could play independently. Unfortunately, you can't export pieces of your video's native audio track, nor separate the audio and video from within Videowave.

 

The solution:

 

What you can do is run the Windows Sound recorder while the portion of the audio you want to export is playing in Videowave (or any video player for that matter). You may have to futz with your sound card mixer software, as well as the audio source and quality settings of the recorder to get things to work, but it should be doable. Indeed, if sound card resources are usually among the most sharable and simultaneously usable in a PC. Once things are set up and you've run a few tests, you can simply play the portion of the video or production where the audio is of interest to you, from Videowave (or any player for that matter). Then, simply click the RECORD button on the recorder maybe a second before the part you need, and pause/stop recording after the portion has gone by. Whe your done, save the recorded clip (it will be a WAV file). Remember to save it in your project folder so it won't get accidentally moved later too. Then and finally, you can bring the audio file right in to the audio track of Videowave.

 

Synchronization is a little tricky. Temporarily keep both the audio from the original clip and the import enabled. This will let you drag the audio until the two are pretty well synchronized, and at that point you can disable the original audio.

 

 

Have you tried right clicking on the file in the Media Selector and choosing Extract Audio? Save the audio file to the same folder and then just drag it to another audio track. You can also use the Edit Volume Envelope feature to raise and lower volume, etc.

 

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Have you tried right clicking on the file in the Media Selector and choosing Extract Audio? Save the audio file to the same folder and then just drag it to another audio track. You can also use the Edit Volume Envelope feature to raise and lower volume, etc.

 

The only problem with that is it can leave you with a HUGE file. Consider if, as in my case, the video file I was working with was nearly 40 minutes long! If you only need perhaps a one minute segment in audio, the record approach is actually a faster way to get it done, and you get to start and work with a reasonably small audio file.

 

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The problem:

 

Well it was a problem for me anyway. Sometimes you may want to cut pieces out of a video and replace that part with with a photo right in the Video track, so you can make use of the Pan/zoom editor on it. Or, you may want to put a view from another camera into my overlay track, but maybe that second camera has very different EQ or sound (or maybe NO sound!). When does this matter? Well if the subject of the video contains something like a band playing that is part of the action (like a bride and groom dancing to a live band), then sonic changes or dropouts can really destroy the flow. In these and many other cases, it would be really nice if a copy of the native audio from part or all of production could be moved into the audio track. Then, provided you spend some time keeping your pieces in sync, the audio could play independently. Unfortunately, you can't export pieces of your video's native audio track, nor separate the audio and video from within Videowave.

 

The solution:

 

What you can do is run the Windows Sound recorder while the portion of the audio you want to export is playing in Videowave (or any video player for that matter). You may have to futz with your sound card mixer software, as well as the audio source and quality settings of the recorder to get things to work, but it is doable. Indeed, sound card resources are usually among the most sharable and simultaneously usable in a PC. Once things are set up and you've run a few tests, you can simply play the portion of the video or project where the audio is of interest to you. Then, simply click the RECORD button on the recorder maybe a second before the part you need. Pause/stop recording after the portion has gone by. When your done, save the recorded clip (it will be a WAV file), and remember to save it in your project folder so it won't get accidentally moved or lost. Finally, you can bring the audio file right in to the audio track of Videowave.

 

Synchronization is a little tricky. Temporarily keep both the audio from the original clip and the import enabled. This will let you drag the audio until the two are pretty well synchronized, and at that point you can disable the original audio.

 

I think there is simpler way to replace a section of the video with a photo that has pan&zoom and not have to juggle with the audio.

 

Create another VW project using your photo and apply the pan&zoom as well as any other effects and make it the length of the video you want to replace. Then output to avi or mpeg2 format. Then load your main video and drag&drop the created video clip on the overlay track. This way the native audio track is not affected at all

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The only problem with that is it can leave you with a HUGE file. Consider if, as in my case, the video file I was working with was nearly 40 minutes long! If you only need perhaps a one minute segment in audio, the record approach is actually a faster way to get it done, and you get to start and work with a reasonably small audio file.

 

Sure, makes sense. I usually bring the exported audio into Sound Editor and then use just the parts I need. I keep the original wav file though, in case I need to make a different edit for another, related project. I got some great advice from the other gurus here last year regarding hard drives and now I've got several relatively large external drives that I work from. But I can understand you don't want a big file taking up space :)

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