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Easy CD Creator vs Media Creator


sli_jim

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I intended to purchase Easy CD Creator, but accidentally purchased Easy Media Creator. I need an application that will write data files, Word documents for example, to a CD/RW and read these files. I need the ability to change the CD name or label without reformatting, and would like to view the CD as another hard drive.

 

I have many CD/RW's formatted by Direct CD, which I understand became part of Roxio years ago. Unfortunately, Direct CD won't work with Win XP. Will Media Creator handle these tasks and also use my currently formatted CD/RW's? Thanks, Jim

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I intended to purchase Easy CD Creator, but accidentally purchased Easy Media Creator. I need an application that will write data files, Word documents for example, to a CD/RW and read these files. I need the ability to change the CD name or label without reformatting, and would like to view the CD as another hard drive.

 

I have many CD/RW's formatted by Direct CD, which I understand became part of Roxio years ago. Unfortunately, Direct CD won't work with Win XP. Will Media Creator handle these tasks and also use my currently formatted CD/RW's? Thanks, Jim

Drag-to-Disc is the Packet-Writing program in EMC 7, 7.5, and 8.

 

However, you have been making two major mistakes.

 

The first mistake is to use RW media for backup. RW media is the same as R media for writing purposes - you can delete a file in either, which removes it form the TOC (Table of Contents). However, you don't get the space back. The difference is you can erase the ENTIRE disc.

 

Granted, formatting the disc makes some changes to that, but RW discs are NOT a "great-big floppy disc" (my software guru was right, and I lost everything on the formatted CD-RW). The same quality that makes it possible to erase the ENTIRE CD-RW, also causes the disc to fade to blank over time, taking all the data with it.

 

The second mistake is to format the disc. ALL Packet-Writing programs (DirectCD, Drag2Disc, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc) tend to be fussy about being read - often requiring the exact same combination of Operating System and Program Version that wrote it. And Packet-Writing can fail, at any time, for any reason at all or no reason at all.

 

Combine Packet-Writing and RW media, and you have the best possible combination for permantly losing all the data.

 

If the built-in WinXP .udf reader can't read it, that is a VERY BAD sign.

 

I'd suggest checking one of the recovery programs, such as cdroller (www.cdroller.com) or ISOBuster (www.isobuster.com) - both have impressive testimonials on their websites and in the Roxio boards. Both have a "trial" version that lets you see if they can find anything before you have to pay.

 

However, with RW media, the odds are very poor.

 

Let us know how it goes.

 

And in the future, if you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc, and NEVER use RW media. (A post comes to mind by someone who fomratted a DVD-RW, and about the time he had it filled, it failed.)

 

Lynn

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Lynn: Thanks for your suggestions. I've noticed that the life or durability of CD/RW's leaves something to be desired. When problems start to occur, I immediately try the CD drives in my other computers and copy data to the hard drive - not the best solution, I'll admit. However, I have never lost data I needed. As far as not being to recover CD/RW space, I have not had that experience. I've deleted data on CD/RW's that were almost full, and put plenty of data on the CD/RW immediately afterwards. Maybe a small amount of space is lost, I have not checked carefully.

 

As far as storing data, I've been thinking of using an external hard drive connected to a USB port. I would put the drive away in a drawer when not needed. The main problem is - my computers except the one I just purchased have older USB ports that may not supply enough current to get the hard drive up to speed. However some of the larger drives require so much power a power supply is included, so that problem may be solved.

 

However, I'll look into the recovery programs.

 

Bruce: I bought it over eBay. The auction was about to close so I hurried - not a good idea.

 

Jim

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As far as not being to recover CD/RW space, I have not had that experience. I've deleted data on CD/RW's that were almost full, and put plenty of data on the CD/RW immediately afterwards. Maybe a small amount of space is lost, I have not checked carefully.

You cannot recover CD-RW space by deleting files. When you delete a file you simply remove the filename from the TOC which is then rewritten to the CD. I believe that simply by "deleting" a file from a CD-RW you lose something like 10MB.

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You cannot recover CD-RW space by deleting files. When you delete a file you simply remove the filename from the TOC which is then rewritten to the CD. I believe that simply by "deleting" a file from a CD-RW you lose something like 10MB.

The rules are slightly revised for Packet-Writing.

 

On the other hand, RW discs will fail faster using Packet-Wriiting than without.

 

As to getting an External Hard Drive, that is a good idea, but Hard Drives can also fail.

 

If the idea is to KEEP the data, I'd suggest you get a spindle of CD-Rs, and use a Sessions-based program to burn the data to CD-R. That's as good as it gets.

 

Sessions-based programs include ECDC 5's Data Project, EMC 7, 7.5, or 8's Classic Creator, or WinXP's built-in data burning (which works like drag&drop but isn't - my software guru said Micosoft didn't want to deal with the complaints that come with Packet-Writing).

 

Lynn

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Guest mlpasley

Easy Media Creator contains Easy CD Creator (Creator Classic and Drag to Disk) Whether it will read your old disks may depend on which version they were created on. It contains many programs which you may find useful. So your last minute purchase was probably a much better purchase than ECD if your computer meets the specifications to run the program.

 

I personally use Creator Classic and write to CD-R's which can be read by any computer and cannot accidentally be overwritten. CD-R's are so cheap that there's no reason (other than the clutter stacks of them can create) not to use them.

 

You may be correct that an external drive might not work with those older computers. However, I've got some older computers that work just fine (although slower because they have USB 1 ports) with a USB drive.

 

If you've got data that you need to protect, do both. Write the files to a CD and an external (or internal) drive.

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Easy Media Creator contains Easy CD Creator (Creator Classic and Drag to Disk) Whether it will read your old disks may depend on which version they were created on. It contains many programs which you may find useful. So your last minute purchase was probably a much better purchase than ECD if your computer meets the specifications to run the program.

 

I personally use Creator Classic and write to CD-R's which can be read by any computer and cannot accidentally be overwritten. CD-R's are so cheap that there's no reason (other than the clutter stacks of them can create) not to use them.

 

You may be correct that an external drive might not work with those older computers. However, I've got some older computers that work just fine (although slower because they have USB 1 ports) with a USB drive.

 

If you've got data that you need to protect, do both. Write the files to a CD and an external (or internal) drive.

It has occured to me OP might be able to get what he wants with a Flash drive (AKA Thumb / Pen / Jump / Keychain drive). I think 1GB is getting down around $30 on sale, and it's possible to get up to 4GB.

 

I haven't had one fail, but mostly I just use them to walk stuff across the room from my main computer (Win98 SE) to the Beast (WinxP).

 

I quit recommending Zip discs after the Beast ate 3 discs and one of the Drives - I recommend taking VERY SERIOUSLY the command to EJECT from WinXP, it is nowhere as agreeable an Operating System as Win98 SE.

 

Lynn

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