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Lightscribe Questions


coriscapnskip

Question

With my LaCie DVD +-RW 16x4x16x Double Layer Firewire Drive connected to my Mac G4 and eventual goal of making a bunch of CDs and DVDs, my questions now are:

 

1. Can I have someone else burn a CD on a Lightscribe-enabled disk, then send me the disk to label, or must it ABSOLUTELY ALWAYS be done at the same time on the same machine?

 

The thing is, I plan to burn the DVDs myself, but as for the CDs, I'm having one friend do the photo CDs and another the music CDs, as both are professionals with the proper expertise and equipment for these things, and I'd much rather pay them to do these and waste my own time and effort hitting my head against the wall :) tearing my hair out :huh: attempting to make DVDs only rather than throwing in negative and photo scanning and music. So can I go ahead and either buy blank CDs and supply them to my friends, or instruct them what sort to buy, then burn professional-looking labels using Lightscribe after the fact when the CDs are finished? Same question with if I burn a DVD in my player's burner, can I then turn around and make a label using my Lightscribe burner?

 

2. As for the DVDs. I was instructed by those in the know online to buy Taiyo-Yuden as the most reliable brand, in DVD-R, and ONLY DVD-R format. Trouble is, I didn't know at the time I asked about DVDs that for Lightscribe labeling to work required a disk enabled for such labeling. (I haven't actually MADE a label yet--but I have learned THAT much!) So anyhow, I went online and can't find that Taiyo-Yuden manufactures ANY Lightscribe-enabled disks. Please inform me if this is incorrect. I went to several stores, and could find Lightscribe-enabled DVDs ONLY in +R format. Finally, at Best Buy, which I figured had the best selection and price and most knowledgeable staff, I asked why this was. The only brand they had featuring Lightscribe had CDs in +R and -R but DVDs only in +R. The Best Buy guys told me +R was the "new standard," and -R wouldn't be made any more by that company if by anyone. My friend doing the music says they're full of it. Are the Best Buy boys full of it, or not? If they are, what awful thing will happen as a result of having bought +R rather than -R? (I found only one DVD -R Lightscribe-enabled disk anywhere, made by HP.)

 

If what I bought at Best Buy works, I've more than half a mind to keep getting disks that way, as those sold in bulk online don't include jewel cases. So by the time I bought a stack of disks at one place, an equal number of jewel cases at the same or a different place, then add shipping for all of the above, I'm probably spending as much or more than to buy them together all at once at Best Buy. IF they work, and IF something awful does not happen due to me having bought DVD +R rather than DVD -R. If something awful does happen, watch this space!

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Thanks. I had some concern with printed labels and also with the expense involved in printing directly to a disk surface. I will stick with Lightscribe for awhile and see how I like the results since I already have it and it won't involve buying anything, including labels or ink, other than the proper disks.

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P. S. And must Lightscribe labeling be done IMMEDIATELY after a burn? What if you want to do an elaborate label that takes time, such as selecting, lining up, and placing a picture, or fitting on a bunch of titles? Is there any way to set it up before or afterwards or must it ALL be done RIGHT THEN as the burn is finished?

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Thanks for describing that. People here http://groups.google.com/group/alt.video.d...da2da304c96cbd8 are mostly trashing Lightscribe and suggesting I drop the bucks on a printer which will do color inkjet labels so now I'm all confused. :)

 

I still think the initial output for such a printer, then the cost of ink vs. the cost of whatever extra a Lightscribe-enabled disk is, plus the fact that I already HAVE Lightscribe, makes it the better choice, unless something about it really causes DVD playing problems.

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Lightscribe is a separate process that involves burning a grayscale image in the top side of a Lightscribe-enabled disc using Lightscribe software provided by LaCie. Here's a link to the LaCie F.A.Q. page. Enter Lightscribe in the Keyword field. Don't bother with the Product Category and OS buttons.

http://www.lacie.com/support/faq/

 

You can burn the lightscribe graphics any time after the data side of the disc is burned. What I've found is HP makes DVD-R Lightscribe media and Verbatim makes DVD+R Lightscribe media. Both work well. DVD-R is supported by more DVD players than is DVD+R but that difference is almost insignificant except for older players any more. The guys you talked to at BestBuy are just making stuff up.

 

There is only CD-R media. You may have seen CD-RW or a Music CD-R, but there is no CD+R. Philips, HP and Verbatim make Lightscribe CD-R discs. By the way, Meritline.com is a good online source for blank media at good prices.

 

There are three ways to have printed labels on discs. One is Lightscribe which can be rather slow and is monochrome. Another is using a specially-equipped inkjet printer such as a couple sold by Epson to print directly to the surface of white-topped discs. A third is to print to an adhesive printed label on any brand of disc using any printer. Your Toast software includes an application called Discus to design the art and text for printed labels.

 

The disadvantage to printed labels is with slot-loading players, such as those found on portable computers or car stereos. The heat produced by the player may cause the glue to soften which in turn cause the label to rise and jam the player. So printed labels are only good for discs that are going to be used in standard DVD or CD players.

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Thanks for describing that. People here http://groups.google.com/group/alt.video.d...da2da304c96cbd8 are mostly trashing Lightscribe and suggesting I drop the bucks on a printer which will do color inkjet labels so now I'm all confused. :)

 

I still think the initial output for such a printer, then the cost of ink vs. the cost of whatever extra a Lightscribe-enabled disk is, plus the fact that I already HAVE Lightscribe, makes it the better choice, unless something about it really causes DVD playing problems.

Lightscribe is fine unless you want color graphics on the disc. It has the advantage of not putting anything on the disc's surface. As I mentioned, paper labels can be a problem with slot-loading players. The only reason to not use Lightscribe, in my opinion, is if you want color graphics or need to make a lot of these (burning the graphics takes time).

 

Give Lightscribe a try.

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Lightscribe is fine unless you want color graphics on the disc. It has the advantage of not putting anything on the disc's surface. As I mentioned, paper labels can be a problem with slot-loading players. The only reason to not use Lightscribe, in my opinion, is if you want color graphics or need to make a lot of these (burning the graphics takes time).

 

Give Lightscribe a try.

 

I think they have a very long way to go in developing the technology behind Lightscribe. I was extremely disappointed at the pea-green cast from the dyes; I was hoping to be able to, for instance, print jet black on a clear background. Incredulously this is not possible; you're stuck with that ugly shade as a background <gag>.

 

Indeed, even with several re-burns you canNOT get a decent black...it has a definite color cast. And this regardless of whether the media was Verbatim, Maxell, or HP. I bought them all.

 

I was so taken back by the quality that I sent samples to LaCie in the event that I was doing something wrong. When they received them I was told in so many words "That's as good as you're going to get". :-(

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