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LarryV

Editing Songs

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OK, I'm a newbie with RN9 Music Lab who needs some guidance in the basic operations of the program and clarification of some terminology and basic understanding of how the program works and what file types it creates and where. I have several cassette tapes on which I recorded years ago a string of songs one right after the other. I transferred the entire cassette into the program and now want to go back in and separate each song to a separate audio file, then clean-up each song and then save it back as a separate file overwriting the original separate audio file. I am confused about what is a "clip" and a "track" and how they differ. What exactly is a "project" and a "layer" and why should I care? I don't care about creating playlists, don't even know all the song titles nor their performers, and don't care about audio tags, I think. Don't really plan to play the songs on the computer, just burn selected songs to CD's on occasion for use in my car. After downloading the entire cassette into the program, I inserted "track separators" between each song, and then exported each song (a "track" I believe?) to a separate audio file giving each a unique file name as a .wav file. So, now I have two different .wav files in which the song appears (as part of the original entire cassette recording and its own separate file). But when I bring up each song file to do clean up in the Sound Editor, I can't seem to save just the changes back on the original audio file. The program seems to want to create some new project file .dmse and somewhere indicated that the clean-up changes are not stored in the original audio file itself but somewhere else and will be lost unless I save the project file. Where are the .dmse project files stored? Then, when I burn songs to a CD, they don't have the clean-up changes. Also, even though I give each separate song audio file a unique name, when I load a song file into the Sound Editor, it doesn't list the file name I have given it. It seems to load a portion of the original complete cassette audio file. I find when I make changes to a song, I have to save it as a new separate audio file (I believe), thus creating numerous near duplicative, and large files clogging up my HD. The tutorial is largely useless. Just telling me what I can do without spelling out SLOWLY and exactly how to do it, doesn't help much. The video tutorial goes too fast. What is it with these consumer software programs that have excessive technical bells and whistles but are not clear and simple on just the basic operations? I can't find any real help on this in the Help panel. Any suggestions or instructions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. LarryV

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OK, I'm a newbie with RN9 Music Lab who needs some guidance in the basic operations of the program and clarification of some terminology and basic understanding of how the program works and what file types it creates and where. I have several cassette tapes on which I recorded years ago a string of songs one right after the other.

 

I transferred the entire cassette into the program and now want to go back in and separate each song to a separate audio file, then clean-up each song and then save it back as a separate file overwriting the original separate audio file. I am confused about what is a "clip" and a "track" and how they differ.

 

What exactly is a "project" and a "layer" and why should I care? I don't care about creating playlists, don't even know all the song titles nor their performers, and don't care about audio tags, I think. Don't really plan to play the songs on the computer, just burn selected songs to CD's on occasion for use in my car. After downloading the entire cassette into the program, I inserted "track separators" between each song, and then exported each song (a "track" I believe?) to a separate audio file giving each a unique file name as a .wav file.

 

So, now I have two different .wav files in which the song appears (as part of the original entire cassette recording and its own separate file). But when I bring up each song file to do clean up in the Sound Editor, I can't seem to save just the changes back on the original audio file.

 

The program seems to want to create some new project file .dmse and somewhere indicated that the clean-up changes are not stored in the original audio file itself but somewhere else and will be lost unless I save the project file. Where are the .dmse project files stored?

 

Then, when I burn songs to a CD, they don't have the clean-up changes. Also, even though I give each separate song audio file a unique name, when I load a song file into the Sound Editor, it doesn't list the file name I have given it. It seems to load a portion of the original complete cassette audio file. I find when I make changes to a song, I have to save it as a new separate audio file (I believe), thus creating numerous near duplicative, and large files clogging up my HD.

 

The tutorial is largely useless. Just telling me what I can do without spelling out SLOWLY and exactly how to do it, doesn't help much. The video tutorial goes too fast. What is it with these consumer software programs that have excessive technical bells and whistles but are not clear and simple on just the basic operations? I can't find any real help on this in the Help panel. Any suggestions or instructions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. LarryV

First, if you hit 'enter' from time to time, it breaks it into paragraphs that are easier to read.

 

Second, .dmse files are a list of instructions, not the finished file - a grocery list, not the groceries. Maybe someone will come along and explain how to do that.

 

Lynn

 

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