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Size limit on a slideshow?


Gig A.

Question

I just got about 1,000 photo's from the photographer at my son's wedding. Most of these photo's are appx. 2,000-5,000kb in file size per photo.

I am planning on doing a production with say appx. 400-500 of those photo's. Is there a size limit per production?

 

What is the best way I can put the settings on to take full advantage of these high quailty photo's when I make the production?

Playback will be on a hdtv.

I start with slideshow assistant, then do most editing in videowave then make the final production in my dvd.

 

Any/all suggestions appreciated.

 

George/USA

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4 answers to this question

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No, I don't have a blu-ray nor do I know if people who will watching the production does. no DL writer.

I want to add music/transitions/menus, no titles.

 

Will NOT use slide show assistant as you suggested.

 

I saw a post after yours to use Imagecropper to crop them all. May do that.

 

Appreciate your suggestions and quick response!

 

Will post how I do after I'm done. Going to take me a while to go thru the 1,000+ originals.

 

George/USA

 

Got blu-ray? One step below that is AVCHD where you can put about 45 minutes of movies on a standard DVD discs but you must have a blu-ray player that will play an AVCHD disc. Next is standard definition see discussion below. If you can do DL discs, multiply the information below by almost 2 regarding display time. Just make sure that the DVD player is a good one capable of up-converting the movie to higher definition.

 

500 images divided by 60 minutes of best quality movie (a slide show is a movie) yields about 7 seconds per image on a single sided disc not counting titles and transitions. 400 gives about 9 seconds per image. After the first 75 or so people might have pretty blurry eyes. Break your slide show into natural titles (movies) so people can watch part of it then another part when they are ready.

 

DO NOT use Slide Show Assistant; use Edit Video -Advanced (Video Wave) to make several productions.

 

If you just want to display the images on a DVD/TV (no menus, no music, no transitions, no anything other than the images), and your player will play a jpeg disc; consider that. Refer to your DVD player instruction manual for details. The images there will be high quality.

 

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Got blu-ray? One step below that is AVCHD where you can put about 45 minutes of movies on a standard DVD discs but you must have a blu-ray player that will play an AVCHD disc. Next is standard definition see discussion below. If you can do DL discs, multiply the information below by almost 2 regarding display time. Just make sure that the DVD player is a good one capable of up-converting the movie to higher definition.

 

500 images divided by 60 minutes of best quality movie (a slide show is a movie) yields about 7 seconds per image on a single sided disc not counting titles and transitions. 400 gives about 9 seconds per image. After the first 75 or so people might have pretty blurry eyes. Break your slide show into natural titles (movies) so people can watch part of it then another part when they are ready.

 

DO NOT use Slide Show Assistant; use Edit Video -Advanced (Video Wave) to make several productions.

 

If you just want to display the images on a DVD/TV (no menus, no music, no transitions, no anything other than the images), and your player will play a jpeg disc; consider that. Refer to your DVD player instruction manual for details. The images there will be high quality.

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I personally have had some problems using very large images in slide shows. And for whatever reason, the ones that gave me the most trouble tended to have a horizontal/landscape orientation, the portrait oriented images didn't cause a problem. (The symptoms were that the pictures didn't display/displayed as black in VideoWave.) The solution was to resample/resize them closer to the final output resolution, so if the original image was 2400 x 1600 pixels, resample to a third of that or less.

 

As was mentioned, what you're creating is actually a movie of still images, so the "size" limit is the duration of the final slideshow.

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