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720 resolution vs 360 ... DVD+ vs DVD-


paulmpianist

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I made some videos with my JVC miniDV cam. It has 540 lines of resolution at 1.33 megapixels. I am not sure how these specifications are related to each other exactly, but when i rendered my video edits in VideoWave 7 i chose the highest resolution and consequently wound up with double the file size.

What did i get for all that? The quality of the higher resolution rendering looks the same as the lower resolution rendering when i preview them. Is the higher resolution rendering supposed to be better when you play it in a DVD connected to a bigger screen, or won't it even matter?

My computer writes only in DVD+. when i was buying discs, i noticed that there are far more DVD- discs available. Does anybody know the ramifications of this diffierence?

 

I have a few other comments to make but i noticed you have the president of the internet on this board locking threads of anything with bad grammar and poor punctuation as if it were someone selling Brittney pics. so i'll just keep it to these points.

 

(p.s. I found the coolest program for rescuing a crashed hard drive. not expensive either.)

 

paul

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My computer writes only in DVD+. when i was buying discs, i noticed that there are far more DVD- discs available. Does anybody know the ramifications of this diffierence?

 

 

Three options -R oldest and most compatible (?) +R next and almost as compatible (?) and the DVD -Rom, what a bought disc is.

There are three different DVD recordable formats DVD-R RW, DVD+R RW and DVD-RAM. Not every DVD player is compatible with each disc. Even discs within each format do not always work on every player. All of them are different and require the DVD player to do different things. However the compatibility is still improved and the chance of a non working DVD recordable, DVD player combination is small under 20%.

 

Physically there is a difference between a DVD-R disc and a DVD+R disc that is made during the production process. During the production of a DVD-R disc the lead-in is pre-embossed (pre-written).

 

Booktype field identifies the disc as either a DVD-ROM, DVD+R(W) or a DVD-R(W) disc and is for a big part responsible for the compatibility. Because this setting is overwritten during the DVD-R production process it can’t be modified afterwards, the laser of your DVD recorder simply can’t write to that part of the disc. During the production of DVD+R discs the space is untouched. Every DVD recorder and DVD player has a limit in its firmware to write or read to this space. However, there is no limit for writing the booktype field. Therefor a DVD+R(W) recorder will be able to modify this field by sending a command to the DVD recorder and fool the DVD player ( if the burner supports booktype field bitsetting).

 

When the booktype field (bitsetting) is changed to DVD-ROM then DVD players are fooled and will think the user has put in a DVD-ROM disc instead of a DVD+R disc and will read it accordingly. This results in an increased chance that the player is able to read the disc and that’s why the ability to change the booktype field (bitsetting) is essential to a lot of users. Certainly owners of a DVD player that requires this field to be set to DVD-ROM, in order to work properly, will prefer a DVD recorder that supports setting the booktype field.

 

So after burning a DVD-R, DVD+R, and a DVD+R Booktype changed to DVD-ROM. A disc identifier tool ( DVDinfoPro, Disc Identifer, CDDVDSpeed). The -R Disc & Booktype will be -R, the +R Disc & Booktype will be +R, and the +R Booktype changed to DVD-ROM, will read, Disc & Booktype DVD-ROM.

 

There is a non-proven (?) procedure for changing the Booktype on -R media. It involves a second session wrote to the disc on lead out. The DVD Player compatibility to play these is another problem!

 

If you would like a technical look at ( Why DVD+R(W) is superior to DVD-R(W) ) look here.

http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/113

 

There is firmware and software Booktype setting. The software setting is referred to as trickery and some say leads to problems.

 

A drive to name a couple, Plextor and BenQ come with Plextools and BenQ Suite. There a program designed to work with the drive and its firmware to make these settings. If I check the box in these programs to change Booktype on +R to DVD-ROM no matter what software is used its done.

 

The two DVD settop players I have will play -R, +R so no problem with single layer disc's. Dual layer is different and I use Verbatim +R DL media and set booktype to DVD-Rom. Both players play them and one is four and a half years old.

 

 

cdanteek

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Guest mlpasley

Now my 'low tech' explanation.....

 

Your video has to be changed (rendered) to be played on a DVD player. The rule of thumb is one hour of 'best' quality video on a DVD and.... yes, it makes a difference in the quality of playback.

 

However, it won't improve the quality of the original video. You need to take the highest resolution possible with that video camcorder. For example, if you have the option of recording one hour or one and a half hours on the camcorder, pick one hour.

 

Practically, it doesn't matter if you're recording to a +R or a -R DVD. I've seen more of one kind at one store and exactly the opposite at the next store. It usually depends on what they've had on sale the week before.

 

Some DVD players prefer +R DVDs and some -R. Most of my friends with Sony DVD players need the +R. However, for most people, it won't make any difference which kind you use.

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Your video has to be changed (rendered) to be played on a DVD player. The rule of thumb is one hour of 'best' quality video on a DVD and.... yes, it makes a difference in the quality of playback.

 

However, it won't improve the quality of the original video.

 

Better picture quality is a cheap excuse for increasing the data rate. Most won't see.

 

I made some videos with my JVC miniDV cam. It has 540 lines of resolution.. i rendered my video edits in VideoWave 7 i chose the highest resolution and consequently wound up with double the file size.

What did i get for all that? The quality of the higher resolution rendering looks the same as the lower resolution rendering when i preview them. Is the higher resolution rendering supposed to be better when you play it in a DVD connected to a bigger screen, or won't it even matter?

 

540 x2 = 1080 He has a good enough DV Cam. I doubt 7.5 is improving on it, only making it DVD Settop compatible.

A standard analog TV at 480I will not improve picture quality even if 7.5 outputs 10mbps in mpeg2, that gives you your 1hr best quality. A EDTV at 480P or 720P on a HDTV you will see a difference. DVD on a analog TV 480I will barely show a difference, over a carefully encoded VCD or SVCD.

So the real question is what are you watching it on?

 

cdanteek

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Guest mlpasley
Better picture quality is a cheap excuse for increasing the data rate. Most won't see.

 

540 x2 = 1080 He has a good enough DV Cam. I doubt 7.5 is improving on it, only making it DVD Settop compatible.

A standard analog TV at 480I will not improve picture quality even if 7.5 outputs 10mbps in mpeg2, that gives you your 1hr best quality. A EDTV at 480P or 720P on a HDTV you will see a difference. DVD on a analog TV 480I will barely show a difference, over a carefully encoded VCD or SVCD.

So the real question is what are you watching it on?

 

cdanteek

 

I don't understand what point you are trying to make. I can tell the difference between a 'best' quality played on my DVD player and a 'good' quality and I don't have a hi def TV. I don't work for Roxio and I have no control over the encoding that they use or the size of the final file. I was just trying to give a 'rule of thumb' for what will fit on a DVD.

 

I'm glad you agree that EMC7 will not improve the video. In fact, if it has to reencode, the chances are that the picture will lose some quality.

 

My point was..... the better the video input, the better the video output. Many camcorders have two recording modes SP and LP and just like a tape recorded on a VCR, there is a difference in the quality of the final video. Recording in the SP ( usually one hour ) mode will usually be a better video input.

 

The PREVIEW in DVD Builder is not an indication of the quality of the final DVD. It's going to look the same no matter which quality output you choose.

 

I'd suggest that Paul take the 50 cent loss and burn both a good and best type of DVD and see which one suits his needs. I usually preserve family memories and prefer the 'best' mode.

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I don't understand what point you are trying to make. I can tell the difference between a 'best' quality played on my DVD player and a 'good' quality and I don't have a hi def TV

 

I could say it louder. If you don't get it, what would be the point.

 

cdanteek

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