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The Real Reason Why Windows Vista Was Delayed


The Highlander

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The Real Reason Why Windows Vista Was Delayed

 

Jim Allchin (From MS), discussed the reasoning for delaying the consumer launch of Vista until January. Up until now, conventional wisdom would say that this is a bad move – missing the precious holiday season sales. In fact, Microsoft has been slammed by most tech journalists about the delay. Of course, there’s always more to the story – and Jim let us know it.

 

Most PC manufacturers don’t make their PCs in the US. In fact, most manufactures import their PCs from overseas, and they aren’t flown in to the US, but brought over by boat. As you could imagine, importing PCs over to the US by boat is a slow process, and these PCs end up taking months to arrive after their order. If Vista was released right before the holiday season, most PCs in stores would still have XP. In fact, only very few computer companies would actually have the ability to deliver Vista during the holiday season. Imagine walking into Best Buy, and seeing three PCs with Vista, and thirty running XP. Which would you buy? In fact, most of these manufacturers breathed a huge sigh of relief when Microsoft announced the delay, and some has been quietly thanking Microsoft.

 

Jim did tell us, that any machine shipping with the Windows Vista Capable logo will have full driver support in Vista – in fact, it’s a Microsoft requirement. This isn’t going to be one of those ME -> XP upgrade disasters that happened prior to the XP launch.

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The Real Reason Why Windows Vista Was Delayed

 

Jim Allchin (From MS), discussed the reasoning for delaying the consumer launch of Vista until January. Up until now, conventional wisdom would say that this is a bad move – missing the precious holiday season sales. In fact, Microsoft has been slammed by most tech journalists about the delay. Of course, there’s always more to the story – and Jim let us know it.

 

Most PC manufacturers don’t make their PCs in the US. In fact, most manufactures import their PCs from overseas, and they aren’t flown in to the US, but brought over by boat. As you could imagine, importing PCs over to the US by boat is a slow process, and these PCs end up taking months to arrive after their order. If Vista was released right before the holiday season, most PCs in stores would still have XP. In fact, only very few computer companies would actually have the ability to deliver Vista during the holiday season. Imagine walking into Best Buy, and seeing three PCs with Vista, and thirty running XP. Which would you buy? In fact, most of these manufacturers breathed a huge sigh of relief when Microsoft announced the delay, and some has been quietly thanking Microsoft.

 

Jim did tell us, that any machine shipping with the Windows Vista Capable logo will have full driver support in Vista – in fact, it’s a Microsoft requirement. This isn’t going to be one of those ME -> XP upgrade disasters that happened prior to the XP launch.

I like the explanation but it just doesn't feel right to me. Can't offer any other suggestion but it's just my gut instinct. For sure, it's not ready for prime time. I've just downloaded Beta 2 but haven't had time to install it but I do see progress in the last 2 builds. If they're trying to reinvent the wheel, they should give up.

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Here, copied from Outlook Power Magazine, and relevant to matters of intellectual property and Microsoft's own activities in that regard, is another development:

 

Symantec sues Microsoft

Symantec has launched a suit charging Microsoft with misappropriating its intellectual property and with violating a license related to data storage technology. The suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington in Seattle, seeks unspecified damages and an injunction barring Microsoft from using the Symantec technology, which would include a halt on Windows Vista and the Longhorn server, according to a copy of the filing.

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Here, copied from Outlook Power Magazine, and relevant to matters of intellectual property and Microsoft's own activities in that regard, is another development:

 

Symantec sues Microsoft

Symantec has launched a suit charging Microsoft with misappropriating its intellectual property and with violating a license related to data storage technology. The suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington in Seattle, seeks unspecified damages and an injunction barring Microsoft from using the Symantec technology, which would include a halt on Windows Vista and the Longhorn server, according to a copy of the filing.

Clarification, from WALL STREET JOURNAL © - can't do a link, subscribers only -

Symantec Sues Microsoft

Over Storage Technology

 

By RIVA RICHMOND

May 19, 2006; Page B4

 

Symantec Corp. sued Microsoft Corp. on Thursday, citing misappropriation of intellectual property and breach of contract.

 

The suit, which was filed in federal court in Seattle, Wash., involves Symantec's Volume Manager product, software it acquired with its purchase of Veritas Software Corp. Volume Manager allows operating systems to store and manipulate large amounts of data and protect systems from data loss when storage hardware fails.

 

Symantec alleged that Microsoft, which had licensed the Volume Management technology from Veritas, violated terms of its license agreement by using the technology to develop competing features and products. Microsoft improperly incorporated the technology into its operating system products, including Vista, and then concealed its use of the technology, Symantec said.

 

Microsoft issued a statement saying it had "worked hard" to try to resolve the issue, but couldn't reach an agreement with Symantec. "We believe the facts will show that Microsoft's actions were proper and are fully consistent with the contract between Veritas and Microsoft," the company said.

 

Symantec said it seeking "proper" compensation for damages, and wants Microsoft to stop using the technology.

Lynn

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Watch MS do their usual - alter the code and claim it as 'theirs' or try to buy out Symantec.

 

Anyone recall the DblSpace/DrvSpace issue back in DOS 6.2 - 6.22? or the MS 'version' of Sun's Java :)

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