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Formatting of CD-RW


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After formatting a 700MB CD-RW ReWritable cd, it ends up with 571MB. Can someone explain why I lose 129MB of space? Can I fix this problem somehow?

I'm running Easy CD Creator 5.3.5.10.

I would upgrade if I knew for sure that a higher version would fix this problem. :)

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After formatting a 700MB CD-RW ReWritable cd, it ends up with 571MB. Can someone explain why I lose 129MB of space? Can I fix this problem somehow?

I'm running Easy CD Creator 5.3.5.10.

I would upgrade if I knew for sure that a higher version would fix this problem. :)

When you "format" something - Hard Drive, floppy, or optical disc - the formatting takes up some of the space that was available at the beginning. So your "problem" has to do with the way things work.

 

What are you formatting the disc for? It will not create a "great-big floppy-disc". What it WILL create is an excellent way to lose data permantly. I didn't believe my software guru, and learned the hard way - which you are certainly entitled to do if you want.

 

ALL Packet Writing - DirectCD, Drag2Disc, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc - has a tendancy to be very fussy about being read (requiring the same Operting System, program Version, or whatever). Also, different Packet-Writing programs are incompatible with one another, sometime with different Versions of the same program.

 

There is a common misunderstanding about RW media. When you delete something from the disc, whether R or RW, you don't get any space back. You just remove something from the TOC (Table of Contents). The only difference is you can erase the ENTIRE RW disc and start over.

 

Whereas R media is "burned" by the laser "cooking" a dye, RW media is "burned" by the laser (at a lower temperature) melting and re-crystalizing an aluminum alloy. This alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking the data with it, until eventually not even a recovery program can get the files back for you.

 

RW media is an excellent choice for testing things, because the disc can be erased, and you can start over. Other than that, it is an EXCELLENT way to lose data permanantly.

 

If you want to KEEP the data, use DataProject with a disc directly out of the package or off the spindle. And NEVER format the disc if you want to KEEP the data.

 

Lynn

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There is a common misunderstanding about RW media. When you delete something from the disc, whether R or RW, you don't get any space back. You just remove something from the TOC (Table of Contents). The only difference is you can erase the ENTIRE RW disc and start over.

Slight correction, when doing packet writing on a CD-RW (erasable) disc, you actually do "recover" the space on the disc when you erase a file. That space is marked as available for use, and it will be re-written without any manual erasing.

 

When doing a session written disc, you do indeed have to erase the entire disc before any of it can be reused.

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When you "format" something - Hard Drive, floppy, or optical disc - the formatting takes up some of the space that was available at the beginning. So your "problem" has to do with the way things work.

 

What are you formatting the disc for? It will not create a "great-big floppy-disc". What it WILL create is an excellent way to lose data permantly. I didn't believe my software guru, and learned the hard way - which you are certainly entitled to do if you want.

 

ALL Packet Writing - DirectCD, Drag2Disc, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc - has a tendancy to be very fussy about being read (requiring the same Operting System, program Version, or whatever). Also, different Packet-Writing programs are incompatible with one another, sometime with different Versions of the same program.

 

There is a common misunderstanding about RW media. When you delete something from the disc, whether R or RW, you don't get any space back. You just remove something from the TOC (Table of Contents). The only difference is you can erase the ENTIRE RW disc and start over.

 

Whereas R media is "burned" by the laser "cooking" a dye, RW media is "burned" by the laser (at a lower temperature) melting and re-crystalizing an aluminum alloy. This alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking the data with it, until eventually not even a recovery program can get the files back for you.

 

RW media is an excellent choice for testing things, because the disc can be erased, and you can start over. Other than that, it is an EXCELLENT way to lose data permanantly.

 

If you want to KEEP the data, use DataProject with a disc directly out of the package or off the spindle. And NEVER format the disc if you want to KEEP the data.

 

Lynn

 

********************************************************************

Thank you lynn98109. I don't know what the DataProject is, but I will check into it.

Cosimo

 

 

Slight correction, when doing packet writing on a CD-RW (erasable) disc, you actually do "recover" the space on the disc when you erase a file. That space is marked as available for use, and it will be re-written without any manual erasing.

 

When doing a session written disc, you do indeed have to erase the entire disc before any of it can be reused.

 

****************************************************************

Thank you Dave.

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Thank you lynn98109. I don't know what the DataProject is, but I will check into it.

Cosimo

Programs > Roxio Easy CD Creator > Project Selector ... Or Programs > Roxio Easy CD Creator > Apllications > Easy CD Creator. Then, choose DataProject from the Project Selector.

 

And get some CD-Rs if you plan to KEEP the data.

 

Lynn

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