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What's the best cables to use?


Escamotage

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I just discovered my Titanium Toast 10 package came with this program and I'm pretty psyched because I was planning on getting an Elgato. Now, I'm just wondering what would be the best cable to use if I want to convert VHS videos onto my computer. I own a Macbook Pro, either 2.66GHz or 2.8GHz (Can't remember off-hand. Not on that computer) with 4GBRAM.

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Oddly enough, the Canopus doesn't require any software! I'll have to install it, and let you know...

 

Thanks for the prompt response!

 

Steve

The Canopus 110 does need to have some kind of application running that captures DV video. The freeware application Vidi can do it as can QuickTime 7 Pro. The new QuickTime may be able to do so as well and maybe even iMovie. The Canopus, of course, connects via Firewire.

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The Canopus 110 does need to have some kind of application running that captures DV video. The freeware application Vidi can do it as can QuickTime 7 Pro. The new QuickTime may be able to do so as well and maybe even iMovie. The Canopus, of course, connects via Firewire.

 

Sorry - should have clarified: No "on-board, proprietary software" is required: iMovie, QT Pro will suffice, as you point out!

 

Thanks!

 

Steve

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I wasn't aware that Toast 10 came with this application. Was it some kind of bundle? In any case the Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is a combination of a hardware USB device and the software application. If you have the USB device then you just connect RCA audio and video cables to it (or alternatively an S-video cable in place of the yellow composite video cable).

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I wasn't aware that Toast 10 came with this application. Was it some kind of bundle? In any case the Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is a combination of a hardware USB device and the software application. If you have the USB device then you just connect RCA audio and video cables to it (or alternatively an S-video cable in place of the yellow composite video cable).

 

Thanks. I was looking for something more along the lines of RCA-to-USB type of cable adapter. Is this something I would need?

 

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=r...&sa=title#p

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No. The Easy VHS to DVD for Mac has a video-capture device that plugs into your Mac's USB port (no cable needed). It also includes a cable with a mini-USB plug at one end and RCA/S-video connectors at the other. The mini-USB plug attaches to the video capture device and you connect standard a-v cables at the other end of the cable.

 

I'm sensing that you expect to be able to record analog video directly into your Mac via a cable only. That can't happen. You need an analog-to-digital converter between the analog video player and your Mac. Roxio's Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is one such device.

 

 

tsantee. I think you've answered MY query, as well; Recently acquired Toast Titanium 10 Pro for use with my iMac (i5/27"), and was wondering if I could simply use the Roxio cabling (sans the "Easy" software) and import directly into Toast?

 

I also have a Canopus 110 converter that may suffice, if the Roxio cabling won't accomplish that...?

 

Thanks for all advice!

 

Steve

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tsantee. I think you've answered MY query, as well; Recently acquired Toast Titanium 10 Pro for use with my iMac (i5/27"), and was wondering if I could simply use the Roxio cabling (sans the "Easy" software) and import directly into Toast?

 

I also have a Canopus 110 converter that may suffice, if the Roxio cabling won't accomplish that...?

 

Thanks for all advice!

 

Steve

 

You do need a analog to digital converter bewteen the VHS source and your computer's USB port. That Canopus 110 is such a device. Didn't some software come with the Canopus?

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You do need a analog to digital converter bewteen the VHS source and your computer's USB port. That Canopus 110 is such a device. Didn't some software come with the Canopus?

 

Oddly enough, the Canopus doesn't require any software! I'll have to install it, and let you know...

 

Thanks for the prompt response!

 

Steve

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Thanks. I was looking for something more along the lines of RCA-to-USB type of cable adapter. Is this something I would need?

 

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=r...&sa=title#p

No. The Easy VHS to DVD for Mac has a video-capture device that plugs into your Mac's USB port (no cable needed). It also includes a cable with a mini-USB plug at one end and RCA/S-video connectors at the other. The mini-USB plug attaches to the video capture device and you connect standard a-v cables at the other end of the cable.

 

I'm sensing that you expect to be able to record analog video directly into your Mac via a cable only. That can't happen. You need an analog-to-digital converter between the analog video player and your Mac. Roxio's Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is one such device.

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No. The Easy VHS to DVD for Mac has a video-capture device that plugs into your Mac's USB port (no cable needed). It also includes a cable with a mini-USB plug at one end and RCA/S-video connectors at the other. The mini-USB plug attaches to the video capture device and you connect standard a-v cables at the other end of the cable.

 

I'm sensing that you expect to be able to record analog video directly into your Mac via a cable only. That can't happen. You need an analog-to-digital converter between the analog video player and your Mac. Roxio's Easy VHS to DVD for Mac is one such device.

 

I think I understand now. Thank you.

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