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Transcoding / Re-encoding MPEG Data


mbb999

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Apologies if this is already explained (in great detail) somewhere on the forum (or in the documentation) but I can't find it :(

 

I've used TMPGEnc to generate a number of MPEG files which I want to burn to DVD.

If I use DVD Creator 6 to generate an ISO image, the tools must perform some form of "transcoding" or "re-encoding" as the overall size of the ISO is significantly less than the sum of all the MPEG files; (the MPEG files total about 4.2GBytes whereas the ISO image is about 3.5GBytes).

 

How do I stop the DVD Builder tool from doing this?

 

Thanks

 

PS I tried using Nero to build the DVD ISO and it has an option to "smart encode", whereby it uses the raw MPEG data, and the resulting ISO is a more believable size. Unfortunately the resulting DVD freezes after about 20 seconds playing in a nuymber of different PCs and a Panasonic DVD layer :(

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The file sizes have absolutely nothing to do with it! Video is based on TIME.

 

With V6:

 

60 minutes at Low Compression, Est Project Size 3.385gb

95 minutes at High Compression, Est Project Size 3.354gb

 

That's it not 1 second more and no cheating :lol: Frankly anything over 1 hour on a 4.7GB DVD and I don't even want to look at it!

 

With the newer versions, you missed 7 versions, 2 hours is the normal max, but it can be fooled into 12 hours worth… Looks like carp, but I made one once.

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Thanks for the info!

 

I'm dissapointed that tools don't let you have more control over the amount of compression; it seems a shame to have all that spare DVD capacity and not fill it up with higher quality data...

 

...But at least I now know why I get "unexpected" results.

 

Thanks

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I appreciate that there's a trade-off between image quality and overall size.

In your original comments you indicate that 60 minutes of video at low compression is approx 3.385GBytes and at high compression you can get 95 minutes for a similar amount of storage.

 

My point is that I'd already made the quality/size trade-off with my TMPGEnc settings and was disappointed that DVD Builder saw fit to do it's own thing, ie re-encode the data.

If my DVD holds 4.7GBytes why not use all of it to get the best quality for the available storage?

 

Anyway, thanks for taking the time to give me your thoughts; it's much appreciated.

 

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Your really not getting this…

 

You are dealing with DVD Movies, not slapping files on a DVD. File size is absolutely meaningless. Anything you put into DVD Builder is based on time not size. It will generate a Project Size…

 

Those sizes I gave you will fill a 4.7GB disc to the limit! In fact if you exceed the sizes I gave you, it will cut off and not put anything past that, on the disc…

 

You are dealing with V6 which lived for 1 year, 2004-5. It was one of a kind so if you insist on using 5 year old software, you will have to live with state of art limitations of 5 years ago.

 

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In your original response you stated:

 

"With V6:

 

60 minutes at Low Compression, Est Project Size 3.385gb

95 minutes at High Compression, Est Project Size 3.354gb"

 

Whereas in your last reply you state:

 

"Anything you put into DVD Builder is based on time not size"

.

 

How are these two statements not contradictory?

 

The only way that I can see that these can both be true is if there are discrete compression settings (ie "Low", "Medium", "High", etc defined in some specification somewhere).

However I don't believe this to be true as other tools, (ie Nero, TMPGEnc, etc) allow the user to define the maximum bitrate of the resulting MPEG file.

 

 

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In your original response you stated:

 

"With V6:

 

60 minutes at Low Compression, Est Project Size 3.385gb

95 minutes at High Compression, Est Project Size 3.354gb"

 

Whereas in your last reply you state:

 

"Anything you put into DVD Builder is based on time not size"

.

 

How are these two statements not contradictory?

 

The only way that I can see that these can both be true is if there are discrete compression settings (ie "Low", "Medium", "High", etc defined in some specification somewhere).

However I don't believe this to be true as other tools, (ie Nero, TMPGEnc, etc) allow the user to define the maximum bitrate of the resulting MPEG file.

I think we are done here…

 

You are at the point where you need to try it! You are thinking way too hard :lol:

 

Get some RW’s and you will see what I said is true and you will understand it better when you discover it yourself.

 

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In your original response you stated:

 

"With V6:

 

60 minutes at Low Compression, Est Project Size 3.385gb

95 minutes at High Compression, Est Project Size 3.354gb"

 

Whereas in your last reply you state:

 

"Anything you put into DVD Builder is based on time not size"

.

 

How are these two statements not contradictory?

 

The only way that I can see that these can both be true is if there are discrete compression settings (ie "Low", "Medium", "High", etc defined in some specification somewhere).

However I don't believe this to be true as other tools, (ie Nero, TMPGEnc, etc) allow the user to define the maximum bitrate of the resulting MPEG file.

You have got it into your head that "Video DVD" is a type of data file, which is measured by size rather than time.

 

In actuality, "Video DVD" is a very specific type of encoding which enables it to be read as a Video DVD by a DVD player.

 

So go ahead and make some data discs of your Videos. It is always possible you have a DVD player which will be able to read them.

 

If it can't then you are going to have to make actual "Video DVD"s using the Video DVD standards, as Jim has repeatedly tried to explain.

 

Lynn

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