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Transfer size, format, and quality


sypher

Question

I didn't see a thread specifically on transfer size, format, and retaining quality.

Before using Easy VHS to DVD, I've been trying to get some answers before starting the process, since it will be a lengthy one, and have been discouraged so far in what I've read on multiple levels.

 

From my understanding, 1 hour of VHS tape = a file size of 14gb.

That doesn't make a lot of sense when standard DVD's these days hold up to 4+ hours of high quality video and content, or more, on one disc....and that doesn't include blu-ray, which holds a capacity of 25gb.

What is the breakdown in length of tape, at a particular quality to different video format types to file size? Is .AVI or MPEG-2 the standard and best quality format to use, if I want the best or equal quality of the VHS tape when transferring to digital?

 

Primarily, if I have VHS tapes that are 6 to 8 hours long of video content, recorded at SLP (or now know as EP) on T-120 or T-160 VHS tapes....if I'm wanting the absolute best quality or quality equal to that of the tape....what file size am I ultimately looking at for "1" 6-8hr long tape?

 

I'm not sure how compression would factor in, especially in transferring to a dvd disc, but overall what is the breakdown?

 

I would like to put a percentage of video on dvd, and the majority could go to an external drive...but the last part is dependent on how much I could store.

 

 

This was the only bit of info I saw by Jim Hardin, because the issue was not addressed, but this is strictly DVD time.

 

DVD Time/Capacity

4.7Gb:

HQ = 1:06

SP = 1:37

LP = 2:22

ELP = 3:04

 

8.5 Gb:

HQ = 2:00

SP = 2:57

LP = 4:19

ELP = 5:35

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File size means nothing when it comes to DVD, its the time length of the video and the selected quality that determines how much video you can get on a standard 4.7GB DVD. They are as you have shown. The more video you try to squeeze an a DVD, the higher the compression and the lower the quality. If you have low quality video such as SP from VHS then don't try to put more then 60 minutes of video on a DVD otherwise it will be unwatchable.

 

When capturing, I would capture to avi format since that gives the best quality with the least compression but large file sizes.

 

BTW, don't try to compare Hollywood created DVDs to something created with what we do - they use programs that cost $1000 to do their compression.

 

File size matters because it's within the quality and length, that the size is determined....which determines whether you can put your video on a disc or have to split it up or reduce the quality to make it fit.

 

I had a two hour video which I had to downgrade, just to fit it to a dvd.

 

In addition are you saying that of the quality formats with VHS, which there were only 3 options, SP, LP, and SLP....if you're saying SP is a low quality, does that make SLP the lowest quality format....and within that, in transferring to a decent quality, are my options minimal?

 

All my VHS tape recordings were done in SLP. Each tape has 8 hours of video. I was hoping to make an equal copy from VHS to DVD, but at best, to have equal quality.....for every 8 hour tape, I will need 2 dvd's just to cover?

 

I'm just trying to wrap my head around this, so I'm not wasting too many discs during tests, and don't want to make an error in not recording in the best quality I can, or in the best possible way.

 

In addition.....is this program setup to I could record to a blu-ray disc?

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File size matters because it's within the quality and length, that the size is determined....which determines whether you can put your video on a disc or have to split it up or reduce the quality to make it fit.

 

I had a two hour video which I had to downgrade, just to fit it to a dvd.

 

In addition are you saying that of the quality formats with VHS, which there were only 3 options, SP, LP, and SLP....if you're saying SP is a low quality, does that make SLP the lowest quality format....and within that, in transferring to a decent quality, are my options minimal?

 

All my VHS tape recordings were done in SLP. Each tape has 8 hours of video. I was hoping to make an equal copy from VHS to DVD, but at best, to have equal quality.....for every 8 hour tape, I will need 2 dvd's just to cover?

 

I'm just trying to wrap my head around this, so I'm not wasting too many discs during tests, and don't want to make an error in not recording in the best quality I can, or in the best possible way.

 

In addition.....is this program setup to I could record to a blu-ray disc?

 

To get 8 hours of video to DVDs and keep the same quality that you captured (SLP tape recordings are the lowest quality to start with), you will have to select HQ (best quality). Since a 4.7GB DVD can only hold 60 minutes of video at HQ quality, you will need 8 DVDs for the 8 hours.

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I didn't see a thread specifically on transfer size, format, and retaining quality.

Before using Easy VHS to DVD, I've been trying to get some answers before starting the process, since it will be a lengthy one, and have been discouraged so far in what I've read on multiple levels.

 

From my understanding, 1 hour of VHS tape = a file size of 14gb.

That doesn't make a lot of sense when standard DVD's these days hold up to 4+ hours of high quality video and content, or more, on one disc....and that doesn't include blu-ray, which holds a capacity of 25gb.

What is the breakdown in length of tape, at a particular quality to different video format types to file size? Is .AVI or MPEG-2 the standard and best quality format to use, if I want the best or equal quality of the VHS tape when transferring to digital?

 

Primarily, if I have VHS tapes that are 6 to 8 hours long of video content, recorded at SLP (or now know as EP) on T-120 or T-160 VHS tapes....if I'm wanting the absolute best quality or quality equal to that of the tape....what file size am I ultimately looking at for "1" 6-8hr long tape?

 

I'm not sure how compression would factor in, especially in transferring to a dvd disc, but overall what is the breakdown?

 

I would like to put a percentage of video on dvd, and the majority could go to an external drive...but the last part is dependent on how much I could store.

 

 

This was the only bit of info I saw by Jim Hardin, because the issue was not addressed, but this is strictly VHS to DVD.

 

DVD Time/Capacity

4.7Gb:

HQ = 1:06

SP = 1:37

LP = 2:22

ELP = 3:04

 

8.5 Gb:

HQ = 2:00

SP = 2:57

LP = 4:19

ELP = 5:35

 

File size means nothing when it comes to DVD, its the time length of the video and the selected quality that determines how much video you can get on a standard 4.7GB DVD. They are as you have shown. The more video you try to squeeze an a DVD, the higher the compression and the lower the quality. If you have low quality video such as SP from VHS then don't try to put more then 60 minutes of video on a DVD otherwise it will be unwatchable.

 

When capturing, I would capture to avi format since that gives the best quality with the least compression but large file sizes.

 

BTW, don't try to compare Hollywood created DVDs to something created with what we do - they use programs that cost $1000 to do their compression.

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Walt pretty well covered it.

 

If you recorded at the minimum quality you may be stuck and need to do some testing before pouring hours of work into this!

 

The capture sizes V2D offer work out to these approximent file sizes:

 

DV = 12.8 GB/Hr

DV HQ = 3.45 GB/Hr

DV SP = 1.77 GB/Hr

DV LP = .081 GB/Hr

VCD = 0.561 GB/Hr

 

The quality of DV & DV HQ are almost the same. In my opinion, DV HQ is fine to use if you are going from Capture to DVD (or viewing on PC) directly or with a minimum of editing.

 

It is only if you end up re-rendering the file a few times before you finally burn it that it will start to degrade.

 

What you want to do is get a few DVD RW discs (Verbatim & Taiyo Yuden only) for testing.

 

Then capture the same 5 minute clip in the top 4 qualities. (skip VCD it isn't worth it)

 

Now open MyDVD and put all 4 clips on one DVD as separate Titles and Burn a disc with set output quality to HQ.

 

Then another at SP, LP & EP. Play them and see what you think…

 

Pay attention to details while you watch. In one test there was a wood panel in the background. I could see it was a wood panel when captured in DV HQ and output in SP.

 

But when output in HQ, I could see the grain in the panel!

 

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