Jump to content
  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 9 Guests (See full list)

    • There are no registered users currently online
  • 0

Saving files to CD and DVD


DocSavage
 Share

Question

This might be so Old School as to be impossible, but I used to be able to save data files to my CD or DVD by simply using "Save As" and pointing to the disk, or by dragging and dropping the files into the disk window. Now, I seem to have to use the Data Disc function in Creator 10 to create a Project, and then save the files to somewhere on my hard drive, from which I have to drag and drop them into the Creator 10 Project. AND, if I want to save something else on the largely unused CD or DVD later, it won't let me because I have to use a NEW disk.

 

To make things even more interesting Windows Vista now tries to take over the whole Save As function by sequestering the files somewhere on my hard drive, and only after I go through the additional step of stating that now it should burn those files will it actually transfer them to the disc! Sheesh!

 

There seem to be two incompatible competing systems for saving files to disks, and neither of them is as simple as Save As or drag and drop.

 

Is there a series of settings of Vista and Creator that I'm missing so that I can simply save files to CD and DVD easily and repeatedly without all the go betweens?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

DocSavage,

 

[Ah, there's a venerable name :) first published in 1933]

 

Earlier versions of Roxioand Sonic suites used to have a 'packet writer' called Direct CD or Drag to Disc or DLA. These were the systems which required you to specially format a disc, but then allowed you to 'save as' or drag and drop directly to disc through Windows Explorer. The packet writer was dropped after EMC 9 because it was included free in Vista where it is called the 'Live File System'.

 

Creator Classic in C2010 uses a standard writing system to write standard "sessions" on a standard unformatted disc. It will allow you to close the session [required] but leave the disc open so you can keep writing sessions until it's finally full. The discs it writes are standard data discs which can be read on any PC, unlike the earlier packet-written discs which often couldn't be read on anything but the system which wrote them.

 

I don't know if Vista's Live File system will let you "save as" to an optical disc, since I've avoided Vista where possible, but the system does have a good Help file. With Creator you have to save to the hard drive first and then drop a session onto disc. This is not as convenient as Drag to Disc, but it is much more reliable. The price of progress perhaps?

 

Regards,

Brendon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Brendon,

 

Not many people still get the Doc Savage reference. It's good to hear that Will Murray isn't forgotten.

 

I gather you get my sort of question all the time. Sorry about being just another one, but you definitely answered me. I think I've gotten the hang of using Creator Classic now for data backup, but it's certainly circuitous.

 

Anyway, thanks again.

 

-DocSavage

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Doc,

We were talking at home about the series of books just this past Saturday. :)

 

Yes, we got this question a lot when Roxio first dropped the packet-writers, and are still getting it from "returnees". Please don't be sorry, you did no wrong, and there will be a lot of people who read this topic and don't have to ask.

 

Best regards,

Brendon

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...