Jump to content
  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 11 Guests (See full list)

    • There are no registered users currently online

how to read UDF cd on different machine


redsss

Recommended Posts

I copied files to a CDR in UDF format using EZ Cd creator, and have since gotten rid of that computer and CD burner.

 

I tried installing roxio udf reader to my laptop but was unable to read the CD, so this has brought several questions to mind:

 

1) What kind of CD drive is required to read UDF disks burned by adaptec/roxio? Does it have to be a CD burner to read UDF disks that havent been closed to ISO-9660 format?

 

2) Are Roxio's UDF format and Nero's UDF format interchangeable?

 

3) what is the best way to read udf disks? I have a DVD burner that doesnt work when I tried roxio/adaptec's udf reader

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I copied files to a CDR in UDF format using EZ Cd creator, and have since gotten rid of that computer and CD burner.

 

I tried installing roxio udf reader to my laptop but was unable to read the CD, so this has brought several questions to mind:

 

1) What kind of CD drive is required to read UDF disks burned by adaptec/roxio? Does it have to be a CD burner to read UDF disks that havent been closed to ISO-9660 format?

 

2) Are Roxio's UDF format and Nero's UDF format interchangeable?

 

3) what is the best way to read udf disks? I have a DVD burner that doesnt work when I tried roxio/adaptec's udf reader

 

 

 

Try one of these to recover your UDF formatted disc's:

 

 

http://www.cdroller.com/

 

http://www.isobuster.com/udf/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like you didn't use ECDC, but rather DirectCD, which requires that first you format the disc. This is called "Packet-Writing", and it's primary purpose is for VERY TEMPORARY storage, or else permantly losing data.

 

(If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc. Use a BLANK blank, directly out of the box or off the spindle, and a sessions-based program like DataProject, Easy Media Creator's Classic Creator, WinXP's built-in drag-and-drop style sessions-based burning, etc.)

 

At best, Packet-Writing can be fussy about being read with the same Operating System and Program Version as it was wirtten by, and at worst it will simply fail.

 

Packet-Writing programs by different companies (DirectCD, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc) are propriletary and incompatible; in fact, often different Versions of the same company's product are incompatible as far as Packet-Writing goes.

 

If the disc can no longer be read by either the built-in WinXP .udf reader, or the .udf reader supplied on the DirectCD disc (do NOT install that in WinXP, it's a major hassle to get back out and causes trouble until you do get it out), the disc is pretty far gone.

 

Take Ogdens' advice, and try one of the recovery programs - both have impressive testemonials on their websites and in the Roxio boards. If you used CD-R, the odds are fairly good; if you used CD-RW - condolences, but you can try anyway. The free "trial" version lets you see if anything can be recovered before you have to pay to recover the data.

 

Lynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those tools cost money... isn't there a free tool from Roxio? The version I have of Roxio's udf reader (5.1.1.213) doesn't seem to support windows XP. Am I mistaken? Or does that mean there's a different version for windows XP users, or is the udf format being phased out for XP and beyond?

 

EDIT: I started this post before the last message was posted, so yes I actually used directCD, not ECDC. But I thought that udf for CDR was a stable acceptable solution for adding files to a CDR cumulatively, without wasting 23 or 14 Megabytes per session. Apparently I was very wrong! I just want to know what Roxio's answer is for XP users.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those tools cost money... isn't there a free tool from Roxio? The version I have of Roxio's udf reader (5.1.1.213) doesn't seem to support windows XP. Am I mistaken? Or does that mean there's a different version for windows XP users, or is the udf format being phased out for XP and beyond?

 

EDIT: I started this post before the last message was posted, so yes I actually used directCD, not ECDC. But I thought that udf for CDR was a stable acceptable solution for adding files to a CDR cumulatively, without wasting 23 or 14 Megabytes per session. Apparently I was very wrong! I just want to know what Roxio's answer is for XP users.

If WinXP's built-in .udf reader can't read it, that is a VERY BAD sign.

 

(As to trying to launch the .udf reader from DirectCD in WinXP - it took me a while to get the thing back out of my newer computer, and until I did, every time it booted it warned me the file would destabalize WinXP and therefore it was being turned off.)

 

At the point you've arrived at, you need a recovery program. And I'm not aware of any that ae free. However, as I mentioned, the "trial" version lets you see if there is anything to be recovered, and the cost is academic until then. If you can recover anything, then you have to decide if it's worth the cost.

 

Lynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If WinXP's built-in .udf reader can't read it, that is a VERY BAD sign.

 

Oh, so maybe thats what I've been missing... Windows XP includes built-in support for UDF, which makes the udf reader unnecessary?

 

So let me get this straight: theoretically I can use direct CD to copy files to a UDF CD, and I won't have to close it to ISO-9660, since Windows XP should already be able to read from it?

 

I thought Windows XP only included CD burning support for multi-session CDs, not udf. I assume that XP doesnt include ability to write to udf, and I will still need direct CD for that, correct?

 

I know that my CD-R is not corrupted, as it never had a problem being read in the other computer.

I think the problem may be with my CD drives... I have 2 on this system, a DVD-ROM drive and DVD burner, both of which read a variety of formats including CD.

 

So the next question is, what quality does a CD or DVD drive need to be able to read UDF disks that haven't been closed to ISO 9660? Does it need to be a burner, or have a "multiread" logo on it or what?

 

Thanks for your advice thus far...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those tools cost money... isn't there a free tool from Roxio? The version I have of Roxio's udf reader (5.1.1.213) doesn't seem to support windows XP. Am I mistaken? Or does that mean there's a different version for windows XP users, or is the udf format being phased out for XP and beyond?

 

EDIT: I started this post before the last message was posted, so yes I actually used directCD, not ECDC. But I thought that udf for CDR was a stable acceptable solution for adding files to a CDR cumulatively, without wasting 23 or 14 Megabytes per session. Apparently I was very wrong! I just want to know what Roxio's answer is for XP users.

 

Try this updater for your 5.1.1.213 (its on the Software Updates page on the left) http://www.roxio.com/en/support/ecdc/softw...datesv4_2.jhtml

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But what is this mysterious "multiread" CD Drive that I need, in order to use the udf reader? Does it have to be a CD burner, or a drive with the multiRead logo, or what about the DVD burner that I already have (which is http://www.upgradenation.com/ProductDetail...=DVDRW%2DLG4161 )

 

Remember, I am talking about CD-R, not CD-RW

The MultiRead logo (capital "M" and capital "R") means that the drive can read both CD-R (write once) and CD-RW (erasable) discs, and has nothing to do with the UDF file system.

 

Yes, XP has support for reading UDF discs, but I'm not sure what "flavor". Depending on the version of Direct CD you were using, it could have left the disc closed to UDF 1.5, or UDF 1.1, or open. I'm not sure what version and state that Windows XP supports. I'd be quite sure it supported a disc closed to UDF 1.5.

 

As for UDF being a "stable" way to keep adding to CD-R discs, that's pretty debatable. You're correct that you don't lose the overhead of a multi-session disc, unless of course you close it to ISO-9660 so the UDF reader isn't necessary. But there is so much opportunity for a failure to cause you to lose data that the overhead and reliability of multi-session discs is considered by most folks to be well worth it. The UDF specification is also subject to enough interpretation that different implementations between Roxio and Nero are not compatible.

 

You're also correct that while XP supports reading UDF discs, it's built-in writing capabilities are for sessions, while giving the appearance of drag-and-drop writing.

 

Your best bet for free "recovery" of your discs is to find a Windows 2000 or earlier system with an earlier version of Direct CD on it which will hopefully read your disc(s), copy the data off, and then use ECDC to write to a new disc using sessions.

 

Hope that helps!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...