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Taiyo Yuden finally have a Dual Layer disc

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June 12, 2006

 

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Taiyo Yuden: DVD-R DL Disc for Video Achieves

8x Recording Speed, Fastest in the Industry

- Perfect for Saving Long-Running Sports Programs -

Taiyo Yuden announces the new single-sided dual-layer DVD-R (DVD-R DL) disc for video archiving

purposes with 8x recording speed, fastest in the industry, to go on sale July 1 under the company's own

brand. A DVD recorder capable of 8x recording speed can record 215 minutes of video data saved on a hard

disk with standard definition onto the DVD-R DL disc in about 15 minutes.

With the spread of DVD recorders with DVD-R recording functionality, an increasing number of people have

come to record programs on hard disks to save them on DVD-R discs later on. Moreover, the World Cup

Soccer Tournament opened on June 9, and is to be followed by the World Track and Field Championships in

2007 and the Beijing Olympics in 2008, all events that will provide opportunities for saving long-running

sports programs on DVD-R. With a conventional single-sided single-layer DVD-R, however, the video data

that can be saved on a single disc is limited to only 120 minutes of standard definition video, and video quality

is degraded when longer running videos are saved on such a single-layer DVD-R disc. In addition, while there

already exist DVD-R DL products capable of saving longer running video data, of up to 215 minutes of video

data in standard definition, they are only able to record at 4x speed, which means that more than 30 minutes is

required to transfer video data that have been recorded on a hard disk onto such a DVD-R DL disc.

Taiyo Yuden acted to improve on this performance by utilizing its high-level core technologies in thermal

design and substrate design to achieve a DVD-R DL capable of 8x recording speed, the fastest in the industry.

This product can record on DVD-R DL up to 215 minutes of video data of standard definition in about 15

minutes.

The new DVD-R DL product is available in two types, one for regular analog broadcast video, and the other

with CPRM compatibility for digital broadcast “copy once programs,” so-called because they limit digital

recording to one copy only. Moreover, a wide printable label extends the printable range by 10mm further

inside than regular printable label type, allowing more flexibility for inkjet printers. Sales are to start July 1

with a 5-disc pack in a slim plastic case. Prices will be set as open prices.

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June 12, 2006

 

Link

 

Taiyo Yuden: DVD-R DL Disc for Video Achieves

8x Recording Speed, Fastest in the Industry

- Perfect for Saving Long-Running Sports Programs -

Taiyo Yuden announces the new single-sided dual-layer DVD-R (DVD-R DL) disc for video archiving

purposes with 8x recording speed, fastest in the industry, to go on sale July 1 under the company's own

brand. A DVD recorder capable of 8x recording speed can record 215 minutes of video data saved on a hard

disk with standard definition onto the DVD-R DL disc in about 15 minutes.

With the spread of DVD recorders with DVD-R recording functionality, an increasing number of people have

come to record programs on hard disks to save them on DVD-R discs later on. Moreover, the World Cup

Soccer Tournament opened on June 9, and is to be followed by the World Track and Field Championships in

2007 and the Beijing Olympics in 2008, all events that will provide opportunities for saving long-running

sports programs on DVD-R. With a conventional single-sided single-layer DVD-R, however, the video data

that can be saved on a single disc is limited to only 120 minutes of standard definition video, and video quality

is degraded when longer running videos are saved on such a single-layer DVD-R disc. In addition, while there

already exist DVD-R DL products capable of saving longer running video data, of up to 215 minutes of video

data in standard definition, they are only able to record at 4x speed, which means that more than 30 minutes is

required to transfer video data that have been recorded on a hard disk onto such a DVD-R DL disc.

Taiyo Yuden acted to improve on this performance by utilizing its high-level core technologies in thermal

design and substrate design to achieve a DVD-R DL capable of 8x recording speed, the fastest in the industry.

This product can record on DVD-R DL up to 215 minutes of video data of standard definition in about 15

minutes.

The new DVD-R DL product is available in two types, one for regular analog broadcast video, and the other

with CPRM compatibility for digital broadcast “copy once programs,” so-called because they limit digital

recording to one copy only. Moreover, a wide printable label extends the printable range by 10mm further

inside than regular printable label type, allowing more flexibility for inkjet printers. Sales are to start July 1

with a 5-disc pack in a slim plastic case. Prices will be set as open prices.

 

 

' Perfect for Saving Long-Running Sports Programs'

 

According to Wikipedia, a cricket match can last six or more hours a day for up to five days in one form of the game. Let's watch the full five days non-stop so we don't miss anything.

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According to Wikipedia, a cricket match can last six or more hours a day for up to five days in one form of the game. Let's watch the full five days non-stop so we don't miss anything

 

TiVo-enabled DVD recorders start with a 40GB model and range up to a 300GB, 300-hour model.

The Toshiba, Panasonic, or Pioneer DVR DVD Recorders, Records directly to the built-in 160GB hard disc drive.

 

The key word above is "video archiving" Not real time recording, past the technology limit. Wait for BD & HD 30 to 50gb disc's, should hold that cricket match nicely!

 

cdanteek

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Why make it DVD-dash? Surely DVD+ would have been better (and faster).

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Why make it DVD-dash? Surely DVD+ would have been better (and faster).

Define "better". For that matter does anyone have a good description of the difference between "plus" and "dash" media? I've read the "plus" supports bitsetting, but "dash" doesn't? And what would make "plus" faster? Physically/chemically, isn't the dye the same?

Edited by d_deweywright

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I'd prefer seeing TY DVD+R DL discs for compatibility (bitsetting)reasons. I need this for a five year old JVC player on DL.

 

Booktype field identifies the disc as either a DVD-ROM, DVD+R(W) or a DVD-R(W) disc and is for a big part responsible for the compatibility. Because this setting is overwritten during the DVD-R production process it can’t be modified afterwards, the laser of your DVD recorder simply can’t write to that part of the disc. During the production of DVD+R discs the space is untouched. Every DVD recorder and DVD player has a limit in its firmware to write or read to this space. However, there is no limit for writing the booktype field. Therefor a DVD+R(W) recorder will be able to modify this field by sending a command to the DVD recorder and fool the DVD player.

 

There is a non-proven (?) procedure for changing the Booktype on -R media. It involves a second session wrote to the disc on lead out. The DVD Player compatibility to play these is another problem!

 

 

2003 article is meant to be a list of technical arguments showing some of the advantages of the + format over the - format,

Why DVD+R(W) is superior to DVD-R(W) )

http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/113

 

 

cdanteek

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I'd prefer seeing TY DVD+R DL discs for compatibility (bitsetting)reasons. I need this for a five year old JVC player on DL.

 

Booktype field identifies the disc as either a DVD-ROM, DVD+R(W) or a DVD-R(W) disc and is for a big part responsible for the compatibility. Because this setting is overwritten during the DVD-R production process it can’t be modified afterwards, the laser of your DVD recorder simply can’t write to that part of the disc. During the production of DVD+R discs the space is untouched. Every DVD recorder and DVD player has a limit in its firmware to write or read to this space. However, there is no limit for writing the booktype field. Therefor a DVD+R(W) recorder will be able to modify this field by sending a command to the DVD recorder and fool the DVD player.

 

There is a non-proven (?) procedure for changing the Booktype on -R media. It involves a second session wrote to the disc on lead out. The DVD Player compatibility to play these is another problem!

2003 article is meant to be a list of technical arguments showing some of the advantages of the + format over the - format,

Why DVD+R(W) is superior to DVD-R(W) )

http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/113

cdanteek

 

I learn something new every day. I had always thought that Book Type settings were strictly for DVD+R DVD+R DL and +RW media to make them DVD-ROM.

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I have always read that booktype settings was not necessary for DVD-R media because it was already compatible with most DVD players. I've never used booktype setting and haven't had a prpoblem yet.

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I have always read that booktype settings was not necessary for DVD-R media because it was already compatible with most DVD players. I've never used booktype setting and haven't had a problem yet.

 

You are correct, Gary. Some burners don't book type. Some software automatically sets it, if the burner is capable, and you are using + media. If you are using - media, it isn't applicable.

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If you are using - media, it isn't applicable.

 

DVD-R Media Bitsetting, Booktyping is at the moment debatable! There has been a lot of debate about being able to set DVD-R media to DVD-ROM using DVDInfoPro.

 

Open your DVDInfo Pro. Click the +RW, then click help. On the left side booktype, click QSI/Nu Tech book-type bitsetting.

 

This site fifth post down, A test version of the dual firmware with bitsetting capability for DVD-R . http://www.netfarer.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=71

 

 

Seems to be "His" baby!

 

 

cdanteek

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