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Optimum image size


pigmy712
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I use a Canon 7d SLR to capture HD video in 16:9 along with still shots. I use Lightroom 2 to edit stills and crop them 9x16 instead of 4x6 to use with Roxio projects. I use My DVD to compile stills and video clips without any other editing or software. The stills show up on the HDTV full screen without any bars right along with the video. I have had a few computer crashes but as with all things Roxio it was lack of tutorial saving a project. This program caused much frustration but like all software it is easy once you learn how. Totally unfriendly and still have trouble remembering where I found a feature if I don't use it often. I have burned three projects now that are 30 minutes are less and used the iso file to make copies. First burn with compiling runs 45 minutes to an hour and less than 10 minutes for a copy on my Dell Studio Core Duo 2.4GHz with 4gb memory. At $0.14 for a blank in a package of 100 at Sam's club getting a lot on one DVD is not an issue pricewise but I plan to convert home video to DvD that are longer so may have to upgrade to double size blank. I took video clips in a dark ballroom at a hotel and they were almost black. I was able to make them usable with the editing features on My DVD.

 

That said, how important is the file size of a jpeg photo for screen quality to equal to HD video. I can easily export files from Lightroom anywhere from email size (100Kb) up to 6 or 8 Mb since my originals are 8Mb. I have been aiming at 1Mb files sizes. Is there an optimum file size for My DVD projects? A minimum?

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I use a Canon 7d SLR to capture HD video in 16:9 along with still shots. I use Lightroom 2 to edit stills and crop them 9x16 instead of 4x6 to use with Roxio projects. I use My DVD to compile stills and video clips without any other editing or software. The stills show up on the HDTV full screen without any bars right along with the video. I have had a few computer crashes but as with all things Roxio it was lack of tutorial saving a project. This program caused much frustration but like all software it is easy once you learn how. Totally unfriendly and still have trouble remembering where I found a feature if I don't use it often. I have burned three projects now that are 30 minutes are less and used the iso file to make copies. First burn with compiling runs 45 minutes to an hour and less than 10 minutes for a copy on my Dell Studio Core Duo 2.4GHz with 4gb memory. At $0.14 for a blank in a package of 100 at Sam's club getting a lot on one DVD is not an issue pricewise but I plan to convert home video to DvD that are longer so may have to upgrade to double size blank. I took video clips in a dark ballroom at a hotel and they were almost black. I was able to make them usable with the editing features on My DVD.

 

That said, how important is the file size of a jpeg photo for screen quality to equal to HD video. I can easily export files from Lightroom anywhere from email size (100Kb) up to 6 or 8 Mb since my originals are 8Mb. I have been aiming at 1Mb files sizes. Is there an optimum file size for My DVD projects? A minimum?

 

High definition or standard definition? Most of my images that I use for both are in the neighborhood of 3-4,000 Kb. I let the program downsize them for the standard definition; they seem to be OK for high definition.

 

Make sure yu are also familiar with the TV safe zoneor you will find some of your pictures will be cut off.

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That said, how important is the file size of a jpeg photo for screen quality to equal to HD video. A minimum?
Doesn't have much to do with file size or DPI as it does with resolution. Hidef is 1280x720 or 1920x1080. These would be minimum resolutions. If You need to do pan zoom, then larger resolutions would be better.
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High definition or standard definition? Most of my images that I use for both are in the neighborhood of 3-4,000 Kb. I let the program downsize them for the standard definition; they seem to be OK for high definition.

 

Make sure yu are also familiar with the TV safe zoneor you will find some of your pictures will be cut off.

 

 

When I crop a photo to 16x9 there is no loss of picture when playing the Roxio project on a high def TV that has a 16:9 ratio screen (1920x1080 or 1280x720 makes no difference) However, at some point the file size of the photo will be too small and the picture will not be sharp. I was concerned that very large sizes like 4Mb would cause excessive rendering time. Thanks for the input.

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Doesn't have much to do with file size or DPI as it does with resolution. Hidef is 1280x720 or 1920x1080. These would be minimum resolutions. If You need to do pan zoom, then larger resolutions would be better.

 

Thanks for your input - I hope I am not making something out of nothing.

 

Actually I think we are talking about a minimum DPI in the jpeg file to give the sharpest picture at a given resolution on the TV screen. I may have to try different files sizes and see how small the file is when the picture gets blurry.

 

In Lightroom 2 I can specify a 9x16 custom size, a 1080x1920 or a 720x1280 and it will give me the same rectangle over my photo for cropping - ratio not resolution is used. When I export the edited photo to a jpeg file there is a quality setting from 0 to 100 that will affect the file size. Export for email is 0.1Mb or less. A setting of 90 or more will give me a full 8Mb size which is the original file size from the camera.

 

So the safe thing is to let Roxio down size the file to fit the program - but if I have 100 stills in a project that are less than 1Mb is that big enough to get the sharpest picture? Will using the same pictures at 4 or 7Mb size take an extra hour to process than the smaller size? I am going to experiment and see but I was hoping this would be addressed somewhere by Roxio.

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Don't get all caught up in file size. It doesn't matter. What counts is resolution and if you are using JPG, how much compression. For example if you have an image that is 1920x1080 and save it with a lot of JPEG compression, it will affect the image. So use as little compression as possible with any format. Your average camera shoots 96 or 72dpi which works just fine.

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