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24 Fps Support


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Hi from Hifi Experiance, Bluray tv info saying 24 fps and capture frame rate on Pal HD are you in the UK?

 

Allan

 

Just had a quick look

 

 

http://forum.blu-ray.com/blu-ray-technology-news/57354-blu-ray-framerate.html

 

http://www.avforums.com/forums/blu-ray-players/848236-blu-ray-speed-pitch-frame-rate.html

 

Hope that helps but i wonder can 2011 do 24fps

 

Cheers

 

Allan

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I'm in Ireland and TV standard I can assure you is and always has been 25 fps.

 

I've been involved with TV and electronics servicing most of my adult life and the reason that it's 25 is because, in the early days, sync pulses were a problem, so some bright spark had the idea of locking them to the 50 Hz AC mains waveform - hence 25 Hz (which is why the US standard was 30 Hz - their mains were 60 Hz)

 

Just go with 25 - there's no reason why that won't work in standard TV playback - HDTV is a different kettle of fish). It's a nominal value these days anyway

Edited by gi7omy
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I'm in Ireland and TV standard I can assure you is and always has been 25 fps.

 

I've been involved with TV and electronics servicing most of my adult life and the reason that it's 25 is because, in the early days, sync pulses were a problem, so some bright spark had the idea of locking them to the 50 Hz AC mains waveform - hence 25 Hz (which is why the US standard was 30 Hz - their mains were 60 Hz)

 

Just go with 25 - there's no reason why that won't work in standard TV playback - HDTV is a different kettle of fish). It's a nominal value these days anyway

 

 

Thanks for the info it is HDTV that i want to get into hence the 24fps. You probably know that film is often 24fps and if you play at 25fps the speed of image taken versus the speed of playbacki s differnt that is why i wanted 24fps record function

 

Thank you for your help

 

Allan

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24fps may work well in UK, but it's nothing but headache here in the USA. What makes you think that 24fps is the HDTV standard there? READ More sites and carefully! FPS haven't changed. Check this site

 

Out of 34 different Hi definition resolutions and frame rates, only 10 are 24fps or 23.976fps. 24fps is used by studio to give a 'film' look. Whatever that means. Personally, I see no difference whatsoever. I stick with US NTSC standards because it's much easier to handle in the software and no 3:2 pulldown needed.

Edited by ggrussell
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To answer the question about 24 fps, at least with 2010, from the little I played with that part of it, yes -- haven't tried 2011 yet.

 

RE: fps, IF it helps at all, films like the movies at the theaters are 24 fps -- digital at the theater can be higher, but AFAIK many still prefer the 24 fps look they're used to, not to mention the cost of digital hardware, so 24 fps is still common. PAL TV uses 25 fps, but that's not a big difference from 24 so not a huge deal -- AFAIK most PAL countries usually have/use DVD Players that can also handle the US rate. The US/North America use NTSC 29.976 fps -- each of those frames is made up of 2 fields -- each field contains all the even or odd numbered scan lines -- the picture on the TV updates roughly 60 times a second [coincides with the 60 cycle AC current at the wall outlet, which way back when I think meant something :) ]. When a network broadcast a film they'd add in-between fields to bring 24 up to 29.976 fps -- reversing that process is called inverse telecine or IVT for short, yielding the more common 23.976 fps -- FWIW I've seen much more content at 23.976 than 24, not that it matters much. DVDs for the last several years use another method -- adding 3 2 pulldown [you might see or hear of it as just pulldown]. Since the original is 24 frames progressive, without different fields, *some* frames are in a nutshell shown twice -- as a bonus adding pulldown is simply a matter of adding flags to the mpg2 video file, so you have a space savings of ~6 frames every second. HD doesn't worry about NTSC specs the same way [they use another std], & 24p, 30p, or 60i are common. Blu-Ray movies tend to be 24p [from the few I've seen anyway], while where I live HD digital broadcast is usually 30 fps, but often reported as 60i. If you're not sufficiently confused yet, I've seen some AVC &/or VC1 encoded HD that in portions of the film appear to use a variable frame rate. :huh: Of course that's all just a very brief summary of what's on the site [ http://goo.gl/Gr5nE ] already posted by ggrussell.

Edited by mikym
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