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MRAM Being Perfected


REDWAGON

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I was just reading in yesterdays business section where this new "MRAM" (Magnetic Randum Acess Memory) has been around for a long time but somehow has never been perfected for use. Well, I guess it is being tested now and is working in some of the testing.

 

This new MRAM has the ability to retain all of the infomation on the chip when you turn off the computer, as opposed to the other memory chips we have been using that looses all that information when turned off. This new type memory will enable a PC to boot immediately without having to install all the computer system before it can be used. Boy, this is what will revolutionize computer start times that's for sure.

 

Frank....

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I was just reading in yesterdays business section where this new "MRAM" (Magnetic Randum Acess Memory) has been around for a long time but somehow has never been perfected for use. Well, I guess it is being tested now and is working in some of the testing.

 

This new MRAM has the ability to retain all of the infomation on the chip when you turn off the computer, as opposed to the other memory chips we have been using that looses all that information when turned off. This new type memory will enable a PC to boot immediately without having to install all the computer system before it can be used. Boy, this is what will revolutionize computer start times that's for sure.

 

Frank....

Once again where daily life is starting to resemble Star Trek etc.

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Most likely will require all new support chipsets, but I hope they do get it working.

Sounds like a much older technology, anyone remember "core"memory? Ferrite "doughnuts" with wires through them to read/write and sense the polarity. No power needed to maintain a state. However, it was a destructive read, so it had to be re-written after reading it.

 

"Everything old is new again" as the song says.

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Sounds like a much older technology, anyone remember "core"memory? Ferrite "doughnuts" with wires through them to read/write and sense the polarity. No power needed to maintain a state. However, it was a destructive read, so it had to be re-written after reading it.

 

"Everything old is new again" as the song says.

Here's some I prepared earlier (grin)

 

post-208-1152676823.jpg

 

Core memory

 

Sorry about the size, but the little ferrite doughnuts are so small you'd miss them if I shrank the picture.

I think that array represents about 1K bits. Can you imagine 1 GB of that stuff? :)

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The lattice is about 30mm by 30mm (about 1.2") and there are four of them on each card to store a 1K nibble (4 bits) for BCD values.

 

That one got a bit bruised, but I guess it it is a forerunner of modern FRAM (Ferroelectric Random Access Memory)

(Look here)

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Here's some I prepared earlier (grin)

 

Sorry about the size, but the little ferrite doughnuts are so small you'd miss them if I shrank the picture.

I think that array represents about 1K bits. Can you imagine 1 GB of that stuff? :)

Yep... that's the stuff! Great picture Brendon.

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