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78 Rpm


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Just to toss in a bit of totally useless information, 78s weren't normally vinyl (those were very rare items). The normal 78 was a strange mix of shellac, a filler of a cotton compound similar to manila paper, powdered slate, and a small amount of a wax lubricant.

 

Those suckers didn't bounce if you dropped one - they shattered :lol:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a pretty old dude and the only other record speed I know of is a 78 rpm. (45's-- 33-1/3's--and 78 rpm's). What specifically are you looking for ??

 

As far as articles regarding other speeds, I think Brendon covered it pretty well !!

 

Frank...

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I've a feeling that the very low speed were 're-recordable' ones used in dictaphones (something is niggling in the back of my mind about that) but they continued using wax cylinders up until after WW 2

 

Music recordings were standardised on a nominal 78 RPM from about 1925 - there's a good Wiki article on it here

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I've played with a recorder that used a bakelite cylinder. You "erased" it after recording and playing, by setting the cutter to plane the surface smooth. It was a lot of fun.

 

I also built a wire recorder, but I think that dates me a bit. :)

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I've a feeling that the very low speed were 're-recordable' ones used in dictaphones (something is niggling in the back of my mind about that) but they continued using wax cylinders up until after WW 2

 

Music recordings were standardised on a nominal 78 RPM from about 1925 - there's a good Wiki article on it here

 

I'm not certain of that. I recall seeing an old turntable that had a 16 rpm setting.

 

Just found this link about 16 RPM recordings here.

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My neighbor has some 12 inch (huge and heavy) 16 2/3 records but nothing to play them with. She and her husband (and father) owned a music shop. She thought about playing them at a faster speed aand then electonically convert them to a viable music file but the tone arm support would not let her put them on the turntable.

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My neighbor has some 12 inch (huge and heavy) 16 2/3 records but nothing to play them with. She and her husband (and father) owned a music shop. She thought about playing them at a faster speed aand then electonically convert them to a viable music file but the tone arm support would not let her put them on the turntable.

 

That makes it sound like they're larger than 12"? I'm sure it'd be interesting to do what she wanted.

 

At one point, someone asked me to put some 78RPM discs onto CD. (Recordings of family members.) My turntable only supports 33 1/3 and 45 RPM, so I wrote some code to interpolate and resample, which worked reasonably well, to bring the sound up to speed, and I did the transfers. Now I have other applications that do better a better job there.

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That makes it sound like they're larger than 12"? I'm sure it'd be interesting to do what she wanted.

 

At one point, someone asked me to put some 78RPM discs onto CD. (Recordings of family members.) My turntable only supports 33 1/3 and 45 RPM, so I wrote some code to interpolate and resample, which worked reasonably well, to bring the sound up to speed, and I did the transfers. Now I have other applications that do better a better job there.

 

I've' bought a brand new turn table (78; 33; 45) combination AM/FM/tape player I bought a couple of years ago and used it to change all of my old records to cd's. Worked like a charm. There are still companies that make units that have a turn table that runs all three speeds (45; 33; 78 rpm) but I, like you have never seen a unit that played 16's.

 

Frank...

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That makes it sound like they're larger than 12"? I'm sure it'd be interesting to do what she wanted.

 

 

but I don't remember the 60 rpm speed?

 

I never knew that there were so many speeds, sizes and shapes :o .

 

Too bad the OP never came back so we could find out what the OP meant. Anyway it was a good learning experience for all but the ppost and run OP.

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PROBLEM I HAVE. I am using Roxio “easy LP to MP3” transferring records to the computer. My record player runs only at 33 and 1/3 and 45 RPM. There is no 78 RPM setting, but I have 78 RPM rerecords. Is it possible to record transfer the record at one speed and then adjust the speed inside Roxio?

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PROBLEM I HAVE. I am using Roxio “easy LP to MP3” transferring records to the computer. My record player runs only at 33 and 1/3 and 45 RPM. There is no 78 RPM setting, but I have 78 RPM rerecords. Is it possible to record transfer the record at one speed and then adjust the speed inside Roxio?

 

Not easily; you would need a better audio editing program. Here is one post I found with Google that discusses how one person did it. I have used that software and it is very good but I did not use it for 78 rpm. Gold Wave has a very lenient trial period.

 

I would suggest the trial of GoldWave and if that is not satifactory, then look on e-bay. Make sure anything you look at has the needed phono outputs. Many of the newer ones do not.

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PROBLEM I HAVE. I am using Roxio "easy LP to MP3" transferring records to the computer. My record player runs only at 33 and 1/3 and 45 RPM. There is no 78 RPM setting, but I have 78 RPM rerecords. Is it possible to record transfer the record at one speed and then adjust the speed inside Roxio?

 

 

If it was me, and you really want to preserve your 78's get yourself a 78 player, shop around ( http://www4.shopping.com/turntables/78-record-player/products ).

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I would definitely give GoldWave a try. I've used it for changing pitch without changing speed, a much more difficult task, with very good results. You need to adjust the parameters some, and it takes some processing, but it'll do it. Changing pitch and speed is a much simpler process, even a straight resample and interpolation works quite well. And considering that 78RPM records didn't have that great of a high-end frequency range, you can filter any high-frequency "artifacts" without losing any real music.

 

To do it "properly", you also need a different stylus, but a modern one will do quite well. Also, the RIAA equalization of a modern preamp will be "off" for a 78 rpm record, so feel free to re-equalize to make it sound "better". What I'm suggesting is anathema to purists, but since you don't have "original" playback equipment, you're free to tinker with the sound.

 

Good luck!

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Thanks. I will give it a try. There is a free Beta version. should i go that route?

 

Thanks again.

 

The price is right!!!!!

 

Dave in post #17 has explained what is involved with using Goldwave...you will have to make that decision whether you want to spend hours and hours of testing OR just buy a player, your call. If you just have a few 78's to copy, then maybe you could try it,

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