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Eyetv Hd And Toast 10


gspanos

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Hello all,

 

On the advice of tsantee, I purchased the EyeTV HV digital video recorder in order to capture HD 1920 x 1080 programs from my Verizon FIOS cable to author and burn with Toast 10. It works great, so I'd like to recommend it to anyone who has similar needs.

 

I'd also like to thank tsantee who has been a great help not only on this topic, but on other Toast-related questions as well.

 

Cheers!

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Double check that you are staying within the Blu-ray specs. 1080p cannot be more than 24 frames per second. It is more common to use 1080i.

 

Yep. Looks like the frame rate is out of spec for Blu-Ray. The file is 29.970 frames per sec. Good catch. Thanks!

 

Does anyone have the numbers for the H.264 files produced by EyeTV's HD box? Are these within the Blu-Ray spec? Will Toast burn them to a Blu-Ray disc without re-encoding?

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Good to hear. But I'm thirsty for details, Newbie.

 

Were the files ever re-encoded from the h.264 codec EyeTV HD uses? Did you export them to MPEG2, for example, or did Toast re-encode the program while preparing the disc? I understand h.264 is a codec supported by the Blu-Ray standard and I see MPEG-4 is an option for encoding a Blu-Ray disc in Toast 10 (understanding MPEG-4 is not synonymous with h.264).

 

I did a quick test this morning to see what would be required to move 1080p content captured by EyeTV HD to a BD-R. Since I don't yet own an EyeTV HD box, I exported from EyeTV a 1080p MPPEG-2 file captured by EyeTV's 250 plus and selected h.264 as the output (the codec used by EyeTV HD). I dragged the result in to Toast, selected Blu-Ray as the product, and MPEG-4 as the output codec (MPEG-2 and MPEG4 were the two choices). I selected Never for re-encoding. But Toast did start re-encoding when creating the disc.

 

Perhaps this is because h.264 is, as I understand it, a specification within the MPEG-4 standard and not the particular MPEG-4 format Toast will use when creating the disc. Thus the need to re-encode. Perhaps. But I'm not sure.

 

So I'd love to know if re-encoding was ever part of the process in moving content created by EyeTV HD to a disc.

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Hello all,

 

On the advice of tsantee, I purchased the EyeTV HV digital video recorder in order to capture HD 1920 x 1080 programs from my Verizon FIOS cable to author and burn with Toast 10. It works great, so I'd like to recommend it to anyone who has similar needs.

 

I'd also like to thank tsantee who has been a great help not only on this topic, but on other Toast-related questions as well.

 

Cheers!

Wow! Thank you and I'm very glad it's working out so well.

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Good to hear. But I'm thirsty for details, Newbie.

 

Were the files ever re-encoded from the h.264 codec EyeTV HD uses? Did you export them to MPEG2, for example, or did Toast re-encode the program while preparing the disc? I understand h.264 is a codec supported by the Blu-Ray standard and I see MPEG-4 is an option for encoding a Blu-Ray disc in Toast 10 (understanding MPEG-4 is not synonymous with h.264).

 

I did a quick test this morning to see what would be required to move 1080p content captured by EyeTV HD to a BD-R. Since I don't yet own an EyeTV HD box, I exported from EyeTV a 1080p MPPEG-2 file captured by EyeTV's 250 plus and selected h.264 as the output (the codec used by EyeTV HD). I dragged the result in to Toast, selected Blu-Ray as the product, and MPEG-4 as the output codec (MPEG-2 and MPEG4 were the two choices). I selected Never for re-encoding. But Toast did start re-encoding when creating the disc.

 

Perhaps this is because h.264 is, as I understand it, a specification within the MPEG-4 standard and not the particular MPEG-4 format Toast will use when creating the disc. Thus the need to re-encode. Perhaps. But I'm not sure.

 

So I'd love to know if re-encoding was ever part of the process in moving content created by EyeTV HD to a disc.

Double check that you are staying within the Blu-ray specs. 1080p cannot be more than 24 frames per second. It is more common to use 1080i.

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