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Dvd Video Bloats Mp4 Files


DaleH
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When I drag MP4 files onto the DVD-Video window for Toast 10 Titanium, the size jumps from 450 MB (original MP4) to 1.68 GB in the Toast window.

Why does this happen and how can I burn MP4 video files and conserve space?

The DVD-Video specification says video must be MPEG-2 (or MPEG-1). So, the only option for Toast is to re-encode the MP4 file. It will also use a higher bitrate, to maintain quality, as the compression in MP4 files is usually higher than for MPEG-2.

 

DVD-Video also has a limited set of valid resolutions, so some source files will be scaled up to get a valid frame size.

 

If you only want to archive the files -- without the need for playback on a set top DVD player as standard DVD-Video -- then you can burn your video files as Data, without conversion, and keeping the original file sizes.

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The DVD-Video specification says video must be MPEG-2 (or MPEG-1). So, the only option for Toast is to re-encode the MP4 file. It will also use a higher bitrate, to maintain quality, as the compression in MP4 files is usually higher than for MPEG-2.

 

DVD-Video also has a limited set of valid resolutions, so some source files will be scaled up to get a valid frame size.

 

If you only want to archive the files -- without the need for playback on a set top DVD player as standard DVD-Video -- then you can burn your video files as Data, without conversion, and keeping the original file sizes.

 

Thanks for the information.

My intent is for viewing, not archiving.

 

Here is the background to my question, with a followup question regarding Frame Rate.

 

My only experience so far with DVD Video on Toast has been through saving broadcasts with EyeTV.

A 43 minute program (minus commercials) will save out to a Toast recording at about 1.4 GB.

I check the specs and that's an MPEG2, 720x480, 29.97 fps Video with MPEG1 stereo 48kHz Audio.

 

I recently downloaded some old half hour TV shows that came in as AVI files, 200MB for 30 minutes or so.

Toast does not accept AVI files so I got a translation program called Wondershare Video Converter which is what I originally used to convert the AVI to MPEG 4.

Why I chose MPEG-4, I have no idea.

I understand what you are telling me about Toast and MPEG-4, so I direct Video Converter to a 28 minute 650MB AVI to MPEG-2.

Under Encode Settings I choose MPEG-2. Their defaults are 720x480; Frame Rate 25 fps. (See attached screen capture of settings)

 

I launch the conversion and get a file 700 MB.

When I drop this onto Toast, it gives me a 700 MB file, which is what I am looking for.

I can fit 6 episodes on one DVD.

 

My follow up question concerns Frame Rate.

The Video Converter Encode Settings shows 25 fps which is not changeable, although at the bottom of their window it lists 30 fps.

When I drop the file onto Toast, it still shows 25 fps.

Is this a problem? What is the recommended fps rate?

post-29984-063393400 1301836085.jpg

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I don't use Wondershare Video Converter, so I don't know much about how it works.

I installed the Perian component, which helps both QuickTime Player and Toast deal with reading additional formats, like some DivX AVIs that could be rejected otherwise.

 

For burning 6 episodes to one DVD singe layer disc, I would just add all these files to the Video>DVD window, and save as disk image, without worrying about the size. Then I would add the disk image file to the Copy>Image file window and select the Use Fit-to-DVD video compression checkbox. The latter will requantize the video, if needed, to fit on one disc. It will be much faster than regular re-encoding of video, and the disc will be filled without user calculations.

 

As for the framerate, it pretty much depends on where you live. 30 fps (29.97) is intended for countries that use the NTSC video standard, 25 fps is intended for countries that use the PAL video standard. You can set which applies to your situation in Toast Preferences, so that Toast can convert videos to match the set standard.

If your set top DVD player and tv can handle either standard (quite common in Europe), then it is best to match the source file framerate, in order to avoid framerate conversions.

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