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Help! Encoding Very Slow


cheekyage
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Hi all,

 

I am trying to burn a DVD video from a MP4 file however the encoding is extremely slow.

 

After 45 minutes it was only up to 2%.

 

Here are the MP4 video specs:

 

Video: H.264/AVC, 1280x536, 23.98 fps

Audio: MPEG-4 Audio, Stereo, 48000 Hz

 

Not sure if this is high definition or not.

 

I have changed the custom setting within the Options panel for Reencoding to NEVER but still no change.

 

Any ideas or recommendations would be much appreciated :)

Edited by cheekyage
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Yes that is a HD video file but it also is an unusual resolution that Toast is needing to rescale as well as change the frame rate. Open the video in QuickTime Player and choose Save As... Then choose HD 480P as the format. It may help to do this first and then have Toast encode that version for video DVD.

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I have been given another mp4 for conversion and again the encoding is extremely slow.

 

Here are the MP4 video specs from Toast:

 

Video: H.264/AVC, 1280x720, 23.98 fps

Audio: MPEG-4 Audio, 5.1, 48000 Hz

 

Any ideas on how I can burn this mp4 file to DVD-video and not wait hours on end for it to complete and be ready to watch on my home dvd player?

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I have been given another mp4 for conversion and again the encoding is extremely slow.

 

Here are the MP4 video specs from Toast:

 

Video: H.264/AVC, 1280x720, 23.98 fps

Audio: MPEG-4 Audio, 5.1, 48000 Hz

 

Any ideas on how I can burn this mp4 file to DVD-video and not wait hours on end for it to complete and be ready to watch on my home dvd player?

What Toast is doing is converting it to 16:9 anamorphic 720x480 29.97 fps MPEG 2 with 2.0 Dolby Digital audio. The only shortcut I can think of is to connect an Apple video adapter cable to your Mac so you can play the video via S-video or composite video to a device that records MPEG 2 video such as a standalone DVD recorder or Roxio's Easy VHS to DVD for Mac. In that way the MPEG 2 video is created in real time. The result would be a letterboxed 16:9 video rather than an anamorphic 16:9 which makes no difference on a standard-def TV but looks worse on a HDTV or computer.

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