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MissMolly8908

Vhs Plays Fine On Tv But Is Choppy While Recording

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I am very illiterate when it comes to computer programs so I'm not sure what I am doing wrong. I have a Dell laptop and I use Windows Vista Home Premium. I plugged everything in and it seemed to work fine. As soon as I start to play the VHS it is very choppy and distorted on my laptop but plays fine on my TV. It also makes everything run very slowly. For example when I try to minimize, exit, check or un-check boxes it freezes for several seconds before doing anything. How can I fix this?

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I am very illiterate when it comes to computer programs so I'm not sure what I am doing wrong. I have a Dell laptop and I use Windows Vista Home Premium. I plugged everything in and it seemed to work fine. As soon as I start to play the VHS it is very choppy and distorted on my laptop but plays fine on my TV. It also makes everything run very slowly. For example when I try to minimize, exit, check or un-check boxes it freezes for several seconds before doing anything. How can I fix this?

 

There is some information missing in your post.

 

Are you recording direct to DVD or are you first capturing to your hard drive?

The preview is often not a good indication of what the final video will look like. The video shown during capture is not a "full" representation of the captured video. After all it has to capture the video, process it for display and process it for your hard drive or DVD.

 

What does "makes everything run very slowly" mean? During capture? You should not be doing anything else on your computer while capturing. You will have to describe with some more detail exactly what you are doing and at what point things happen.

 

Also please list your computer specs or at least your laptop make and model.

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I'm sorry. I wasn't sure what all you needed. I was transferring the vhs directly to the blank dvd. I only transferred 2 minutes of it because it was chopping and when it was finished transferring I played the newly recorded dvd and it was choppy as well.

 

When I said everything runs slowly I meant the actual roxio program runs slowly. I wasn't able to minimize it or anything like that without the computer freezing for a few seconds. I wasn't running anything else with it.

 

Here is the information I found for the system.

 

Manufacturer: Dell

Model: Inspiron 1545

Rating: Windows Experience Index :Unrated

Processor: Celeron ® Dual-Core CPU T3000 @ 1.80GHz 1.79 GHz

Memory (RAM) 3.00 GB

System Type: 32-bit Operating System

 

Thank you!

Edited by MissMolly8908

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I'm sorry. I wasn't sure what all you needed. I was transferring the vhs directly to the blank dvd. I only transferred 2 minutes of it because it was chopping and when it was finished transferring I played the newly recorded dvd and it was choppy as well.

 

When I said everything runs slowly I meant the actual roxio program runs slowly. I wasn't able to minimize it or anything like that without the computer freezing for a few seconds. I wasn't running anything else with it.

 

Here is the information I found for the system.

 

Manufacturer: Dell

Model: Inspiron 1545

Rating: Windows Experience Index :Unrated

Processor: Celeron ® Dual-Core CPU T3000 @ 1.80GHz 1.79 GHz

Memory (RAM) 3.00 GB

System Type: 32-bit Operating System

 

Thank you!

 

Your system barely meets the minimum requirements (http://www.roxio.com/enu/products/easy-vhs-to-dvd/standard/requirements.html) and that may well be why you are getting the choppiness, freezing, slow response. That system is not meant for video work.

You should capture to your hard drive instead of a DVD. After the capture is finished you could then play the video to see if it is Ok. That way you don't wast any discs.

 

Do a short capture of a few minutes as a test.

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Yes, Nothing will make a Celeron processer be anything but a crippled cpu :(

 

As long as you can spare the time, it will be fine.

 

Walt presented some good ideas capture and previews. That would be the best approach ;)

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Would it be easier to just get a new laptop? I've had this one for about 4 years and it was used when I bought it. Would a newer laptop work better as long as it met the system requirements?

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If you expect to do a lot of video work then I would recommend a new laptop. If you can afford it go for one that exceeds the requirements by a lot. Those minimum requirements are more of a joke then any serious requirement.

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Like I said before I'm pretty much illiterate when it comes to knowing what's good and what's not with a laptop. Would this one be good? Which of the features am I looking for to be higher for video work? Thanks!

  • Operating system: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
  • Display: 15.6-inch HD CineCrystal LCD
  • Webcam: 1.3 megapixels
  • Processor: 2.4GHz Intel Core i3-370M
  • Cache: 3MB
  • Memory: 4GB DDR3
  • Hard drive: 320GB SATA
  • Optical drive: DVD-RW (DL)

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Like I said before I'm pretty much illiterate when it comes to knowing what's good and what's not with a laptop. Would this one be good? Which of the features am I looking for to be higher for video work? Thanks!

  • Operating system: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
  • Display: 15.6-inch HD CineCrystal LCD
  • Webcam: 1.3 megapixels
  • Processor: 2.4GHz Intel Core i3-370M
  • Cache: 3MB
  • Memory: 4GB DDR3
  • Hard drive: 320GB SATA
  • Optical drive: DVD-RW (DL)

 

To be honest laptops weren't made for grinding out video.

 

It's hard to get folks to understand that, like telling a gamer his laptop isn't up to the task using Roxio Game Capture Software.

 

On reason laptops have a video chip (usually poor) built on the mother board instead of a dedicated video card.

 

The hours encoding video exhausts the battery and should always be plugged in to AC.

 

Then all that encoding causes heat and laptops don't dissipate heat well and that can cause other problems.

 

Now Dell and other big box stores or Best Buy and places like that will tell you they have video or gaming laptops.

 

Once bought they seem to turn a deaf ear when they don't preform like one expects.

 

I do video work on a desktop PC. Those specs are in my signature under the spoiler.

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Like I said before I'm pretty much illiterate when it comes to knowing what's good and what's not with a laptop. Would this one be good? Which of the features am I looking for to be higher for video work? Thanks!

  • Operating system: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
  • Display: 15.6-inch HD CineCrystal LCD
  • Webcam: 1.3 megapixels
  • Processor: 2.4GHz Intel Core i3-370M
  • Cache: 3MB
  • Memory: 4GB DDR3
  • Hard drive: 320GB SATA
  • Optical drive: DVD-RW (DL)

 

cd is correct about Laptops, but for your purposes the one you listed should do nicely ;)

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