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phase52010

Toast 11/data - Burning In "mac & Pc" Or "dvd-Rom(Udf)" Modes?

Question

This isn't really a problem, more a request for information.

 

I have some MKV files containing chapter markers and subtitles.

 

(1.) I startup Toast 11 and select the DATA tab.

 

Under the DATA tab I select "Mac & PC" (or just "Mac") and drag and drop the MKV file(s) and burn to either a standard DVD or BD disc.

Depending on the number and size of the files.

 

I insert the burnt disc into my Bluray player, select it, then select a file, and press play. The MKV will play, but I'm unable to FF or FR or jump to chapter markers. I'll get the ""This operation currently prohibited for this disc" message.

 

(2.) Under the DATA tab I select "DVD_ROM(UDF)" and drag and drop the MKV file(s) and burn to either a standard DVD or BD disc.

Depending on the number and size of the files.

 

I insert the burnt disc into my Bluray player, select it, then select a file, and press play. The MKV will play, and I can FF and FR, jump to chapter markers as well as turn subtitles on and off. All is fine.

 

Obviously there's a difference between burning a file under the DATA option using "Mac & PC" or "DVD_ROM(UDF)" that results in a disc with MKV files on it that will either play properly or not.

 

What I'd like to know is what is that difference? (If the question makes sense). What is the difference in the way the same MKV files are burnt?

 

I know that "Mac & PC" is used to burn data files, while "DVD_ROM(UDF)" is used to burn a DVD. (Video_TS folder).

 

Thanks all.

 

Robert.

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The UDF format is similar to the ISO 9660 format that is the PC-side of Mac & PC, except that it allows larger-than-1 gigabyte file sizes. It is unlikely your Blu-ray player can read the HFS+ (Mac) format which also allows larger file sizes.

 

While UDF is the format used for video DVDs it can be used for other things, as you've discovered. With UDF your larger files are not being split into segments as they are with ISO 9660. There may be other characteristics that make it more readable for your Blu-ray player, such as searching for markers. You probably can learn its differences from ISO 9660 at Wikipedia.

Edited by tsantee

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