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crazycomputer

Cd Won't Eject

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I thought the CD full of family pictures I burned was safe and I could have SWORN I closed it, but now when I put it into another computer there's nothing there. Yet when I put it back into my computer it is there. How do I go back and actually close this so I can read it on another computer? Once I have the CD inserted, if I hit eject a red light just blinks several times and the CD won't come out. What am I missing here?

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I thought the CD full of family pictures I burned was safe and I could have SWORN I closed it, but now when I put it into another computer there's nothing there. Yet when I put it back into my computer it is there. How do I go back and actually close this so I can read it on another computer? Once I have the CD inserted, if I hit eject a red light just blinks several times and the CD won't come out. What am I missing here?

 

Which program within the suite did you use for this CD?

 

Did you use the Sessions based program, DataProject?

 

Or did you make the mistake of using the Packet-Writing program, DirectCD - the one that formats the disc?

("Never trust your ONLY copy of an important file to a Packet-Written Program, such as DirectCD, Drag2Discs, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc. Packet-Written discs have a tendancy to fail, usually at the worst possible time.")

 

Did you use CD-R or CD-RW? CD-RW is a VERY unstable medium, and should never be used for anything you want to KEEP, altho it's fine for testing things.

 

We need a bit more information before we can provide a useful answer.

 

Lynn

Edited by lynn98109

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Crazycomputer,

 

It looks as though you're using Direct CD and writing on a formatted disc, especially if you can read the disc on your machine while others can't read it on theirs.

 

Direct CD when it is working properly will lock a disc in the drive because there are things it should do to a disc before it is ejected. You shouldn't try to manually eject it with the drive button, but should go into the Direct CD formatting wizard and eject it through the software.

 

Your best path to preserve your family pictures is to read them all off that CD onto the hard drive. Once they're safely there, burn them to a CD-R disc with CD Creator's data project. DON'T use Direct CD to format the disc, but write a data project to an unformatted disc.

 

That will produce a standard CDROM disc which can be read by any PC. If the pictures are precious, make another copy of the CD and keep is safely somewhere else in case you damage the first one.

 

In summary, don't use a formatted disc because it will give the problems you've already found. Don't use a re-writeable disc (CD-RW) because they aren't stable and will fade quite quickly.

 

 

Now, if my guess about you using a formatted disc is wrong, please come back here because something is quite wrong in your system.

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Brendon T & Lynn,

 

Thank you both for responding! I never knew, until now, not to use Direct CD. I started out going into Project Selector, then clicked on Make a Data CD, then onto Direct CD to drag files using Windows Explorer.

I am using CD-R discs. Brendon I know you are right about why it is locking the disc in because I know that generally it will come up with a window asking if I want to close the session, and so on. If I put the disc back in, where do I go from there in order to get to the formatting wizard so I can eject the CD? If I put in the disc and select Direct CD and format again, will it wipe away all the existing pictures (and you had better not be laughing at my computer inexperience! : )

 

The computer in question is my old one and it has a partitioned hard drive. The C: drive has 1.47 GB left while the D: drive has 3.97 GB - not much room left! Unfortunately it locks up if you look at it wrong and I have to turn off the power (it is so old). I am so desperate to save these pictures. I need your words of wisdom!

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Brendon T & Lynn,

 

Thank you both for responding! I never knew, until now, not to use Direct CD. I started out going into Project Selector, then clicked on Make a Data CD, then onto Direct CD to drag files using Windows Explorer.

I am using CD-R discs. Brendon I know you are right about why it is locking the disc in because I know that generally it will come up with a window asking if I want to close the session, and so on. If I put the disc back in, where do I go from there in order to get to the formatting wizard so I can eject the CD? If I put in the disc and select Direct CD and format again, will it wipe away all the existing pictures (and you had better not be laughing at my computer inexperience! : )

 

The computer in question is my old one and it has a partitioned hard drive. The C: drive has 1.47 GB left while the D: drive has 3.97 GB - not much room left! Unfortunately it locks up if you look at it wrong and I have to turn off the power (it is so old). I am so desperate to save these pictures. I need your words of wisdom!

 

Create a file on your Hard Drive, and transfer all of the contents of one of the CDs into it.

 

Open DataProject, and use the upper pane to navigate to where you have that folder, open it, and transfer all of it to the lower pane (I highlight it with the mouse and use the "add" arrow, but you can also drag it).

 

Put in a CD-R, directly out of the package or off the spindle. DO NOT FORMAT THE DISC. Hit the "burn" button, and tell it when finished to finalize the disc - you should have enough in the folder to fill the disc.

 

When finished, take it to the other computer and be sure you can read it both there and in the originating computer.

 

Delete the contents of your "new" folder, and refill from another CD-R.

 

Make a note NEVER to format a disc again.

 

Lynn

 

(written in memory of the 80% of the data on the formatted CD-RW that wasn't also on the Hard Drive and was permantly lost)

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Lynn,

 

I did exactly as you said, creating a folder and transferring one CD of pictures to that folder. Nothing went right after that. The light on the CD burner drive was sometimes red, sometimes rapidly blinked green, or was a solid green. I knew it would only work if the light was solid green. No such luck. Each time it came up with this excuse:

 

"There are no supported CD-Recorders available. Ensure that your CD-Recorder is powered on and that all cables are properly connected. You may also need to upgrade Easy CD Creator to recognize your CD-Recorder".

 

Then it went on to discuss updating via the internet, which I cannot do since this computer isn't on the internet.

 

I don't understand any of this since that drive is able to pull up and manipulate all the photos on it, so how is it not recognizing it or imply it isn't hooked up correctly? And I have used that drive before using DirectCD and DataProject, so I can't see how it thinks I need to upgrade...

 

Just for the record, after all else fails I thought as a last ditch effort I would attempt to format the CD using DirectCD JUST TO SEE if it would work. It didn't even show that there was a CD in the drive at all.

 

If I was somehow able to clear enough space on my hard drive to transfer all my photos from all my CDs, is there any way to get them from that old hard drive?

 

Lynn, Brendon.. any thoughts?

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Crazycomputer,

 

Lynn has asked me to carry on, rather than having two of us talking with you.

 

Packet-writing as used by Direct CD is fine within its limits, but can be catastrophic if things go wrong. Unfortunately the difference between that and "ordinary CD" writing is rarely made clear to new entrants to writing CDs. I think if that difference was made clearer people would have less problems.

 

 

 

I really need your full Roxio version number and your recorder's ID string to be able to help you further. Here's how to get that information for me.

 

-Run Easy CD Creator in a data project, click the help item on the top toolbar, and select "About Easy CD Creator". A box will open. The full version number is shown in there.

 

-Right click My Computer, select properties, (then hardware, if in XP), Device Manager. Find the DVD/CDROM icon, click on the + alongside to expand it and you will see an icon and text information for each CD/DVD device installed. This text is the ID String. Please quote it exactly.

 

-what operating system are you running on your OLD system?

-on your NEW system?

 

-apart from the lack of space on your OLD system, are you able to read all those CDs in it?

 

-how much space do you have left on the C: drive of the OLD system?

 

-what version of Windows Media Player or any other music programs do you have on the OLD system?

 

Now, I understand you got some of your pictures into a folder/directory on your hard drive, and then tried to do something. You didn't say WHAT you tried to do, but I'm guessing it had something to do with CD Creator because Creator complained that it didn't know your drive, and made all sorts of suggestions about updating.

 

It looks to me as if Creator might have been broken, but we can work on that as soon as I get your answers back. To answer your question, since Direct CD and CD Creator are very different systems it's possible for one program to keep working while the other is broken.

 

Our aim is to get your Creator working properly too, so you can read the old CDs in with Direct CD and then write the data out on fresh discs with Creator. Please come back to me with the information I need:

 

-Easy CD version

-ID string of the writer

-operating systems both machines

-can you read all the old CDs

-space left on the old system

-WMP and other music programs

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I hope I gathered all the info you needed.

 

Easy CD Creator version 5.0 (306)

 

The DVD/CDROM shows Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-M 1202

 

Old system uses Windows ME

New system uses Windows XP

 

I am able to read my CDs on the old system

 

My old computer hard drive is partitioned

The C: drive has 1.47 GB while the D: drive has 3.87 GB

 

FYI: I have 37 CDs of old family photos!

 

Windows Media Player version 7.01.003055

 

Once I managed to get one CD transferred back to the hard drive I attempted to copy the folder to a CD using DataProject. CD Creator wouldn't hear of it.

 

Just for the record, I currently have a CD (once again) stuck in my CD burner. When that happens, and the light is red, the computer doesn't recognize it. Hopefully that wouldn't influence what the Device Manager said.

 

Let me know if you need ANY other info.

 

Just for the record, you guys are the best. I can't begin to thank you for your help.

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Crazycomputer,

 

37 CDs worth - I see your problem, and the urgency of the situation!

 

Thank you for the system details, but I'll have to deal with most of them in another message. First I need to know, since one of your drives is a Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-M1202 (should be no gap between M and 1202) then what is the other one, please?

 

The specs for that drive at http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/stor...0170E/Specs.htm show it as a DVD and CD reader only (DVDROM and CDROM), so the other drive must be the writer.

 

Could you repeat the effort in Device Manager to get the driveID for the writer, please?

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Hello Again,

 

All I can tell you about the CD burner drive is that it is a HP CD-Writer 9500 Series. The drive will not open at this time and the light is still red. As long as it is red the computer won't recognize it in the Device Manager or anywhere else. Usually if I restart the light will come up green the next time. I don't know what the problem is or if it's at all related to the Easy CD Creator. I'm nearing my wits end.

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Hello Again,

 

All I can tell you about the CD burner drive is that it is a HP CD-Writer 9500 Series. The drive will not open at this time and the light is still red. As long as it is red the computer won't recognize it in the Device Manager or anywhere else. Usually if I restart the light will come up green the next time. I don't know what the problem is or if it's at all related to the Easy CD Creator. I'm nearing my wits end.

Okay, it's no use to you as it is. Something has caused the drive to lock up, and you'll need to power it off to reinitialize the drive.

 

Power the whole machine down. Wait 15-30 seconds and re-start it.

 

As the machine restarts, push the eject button every few seconds until it ejects whatever disc is in there.

 

-Don't put that CD back in that drive, but go get the DriveID for it from Device Manager.

-Do see if that drive will read a commercial silver CDROM or audio disc, but be prepared to power down and eject as it powers back up again if the disc locks in there.

-Do see if you can read your Direct CD discs in the SDM-1202 drive, and come back here with the results.

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No matter what I do, that light stays red. Oddly enough, there isn't a CD in the drive! I have tried your method of rebooting and pressing the eject button but that didn't work. At this point I feel certain it will open if I launch it through a third story window.

 

Okay, what if I bought the latest version of CD Creator and installed it on my new computer that runs Windows XP.. would that work do you think? It should be able to read those CDs, right?

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Crazycomputer,

 

Thanks for trying that. I'm afraid it seems to confirm what I was fearing - the HP drive is on the fritz. I think it has died through an electronic fault or failure!

 

A CD drive is comprised of electronics and the mechanical parts. When power is applied to a healthy drive the electronics run through a program kept in a chip in the drive and command the mechanicals to do the appropriate things. They command the drive to spin up, read the first part of any disc in the drive, report back, and spin down. The light should return to green, and the drive should report both its status and that Identity string to the computer.

 

Your drive is locking up with the light on red, and is failing to tell the computer what sort of a drive it is, and how happy it is to be there. That's why you can't find a Drive ID in Device manager - the drive interface has gone down. If it was just a loose data cable the drive would be sitting there with a green light, but it's not so the fault is with the internal electronics.

 

You might be able to get it repaired, but few technicians are trained to repair drive electronics, and their charge-out rate for an hour's work is about the price of a new drive with a warranty. I think your old drive has become a door-stop, I'm sorry.

 

- - -

 

Now, how to get those files off all those discs. You could (1) get another burner for your old machine, but it would have to be an old model to run with your old software. A new drive might not be recognized as a burner. (2) You could get a later version of Roxio to read them on your XP machine. (3) you could read them on the old machine and transfer them to the XP one for burning.

 

(1) You may be able to find or borrow an older burner from somewhere. If you have a drive ID I can advise if it will be recognzed by your old software.

 

(2) I have run Easy Media Creator 7.5, and it read Direct CD discs I had formatted on both versions 3.05 and 5.3.2, to my great delight. I haven't installed EMC8 yet because I'm waiting for the bugs to be ironed out of it, and 7.5 seems pretty good. I THINK you should be able to read those discs with version 7.5 on your XP machine. (There is always CDRoller or ISOBuster which you can buy to read the discs if all else fails.)

 

(3) You could transfer files between machines with floppy disk (take a month), or a parallel cable between printer ports with the right software (Laplink or simlar), or if you have USB you could get a USB to USB cable or use one of those little flash RAM drives they call thumb drives or pen drives - you can get them in 1GB size for a reasonable price. Alternatively, there are a heap of small (10GB) hard drives out there which come from X-Boxes being upgraded, and you can get one of them quite cheaply. You could fit that in the old machine, fill it up, and then hook it up to the XP machine and transfer 10GB at a time.

 

- - -

 

Sorry this has been so long, but there's a lot to consider and I can't come to your place to do it for you. You'll have to choose which recovery method you use, but at least there is a choice. Since they're CD-R discs the data shouldn't evaporate. You may need to get an experienced person to help you. Whichever method you use, don't change the software on your old machine which CAN read the discs until after the recovery is finished.

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Well I can't transfer anything via floppy drive because I had all those drives removed. I think I may have to go with option #2, buying Easy Media Creator 7.5 and installing it on my new computer. I'm curious how that program differs from Easy CD Creator. I'll have to look that one up. Now assuming I use the Easy Media Creator am I supposed to use the DirectCD option this time? And if I may pick your brain just a little further, since I am the genealogist of the family and archiver of all pictures and documents, is there a safer way to store these items? I read somewhere that it is best to store them on a hard drive (of course, common sense NOW tells me to keep more than one storage place!)

 

So Brendon, if I show back up here and beg for your help again will you be around? I truly do appreciate your help. You are just the best.

 

Very sincerely,

Trish in NC

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Hi Trish,

 

Easy Media Creator is really just the child of Easy CD Creator and a number of interesting visitors. It still has CD Creator (now called "Creator Classic") and Direct CD (Drag-to-Disc) plus a label creator and a zillion other features and utilities, some of which are very nice. A lot of them I would never use, but installation does seem to be customizable if you buy the "boxed" version rather than a download distribution.

 

I don't know if you need to install Drag-To-Disc to read Direct CD's progeny, but you may have to. DON'T use Drag-to-Disc to format and write your discs though, since that would put you in a very similar position to where you are with the old ones.

 

Use "Creator Classic" and write a standard DATA CDROM with it, on an unformatted CD-R. That will give you a CD in the most universal format, which can be easily copied if a copy is wanted, and which will last for decades if stored properly in a cool, dark, dry place. For security you can make more than one copy, and inspect them every year or two. At the first sign of any degradation or becoming hard to read, make a new copy. CD blanks are cheap enough.

 

I wouldn't use a hard drive for permanent storage unless I was very rich and could make many copies. Hard drives have a finite lifespan and if the drive dies at an awkward time you could lose the lot (that's why they make backups). Unless you have so many photographs that backing up to CDs (700MB) or DVDs (4700MB) isn't practicable, I'd suggest you stick with CDs/DVDs.

 

I hope to still be around for a while yet, and if you need help that's what these forums are for.

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