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Ean-13 Code For Audio Cd Issue


giambattista
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Hello, after I have entered EAN-13 code, the code can not be saved.

While ISRC code can be correctly saved for each track,

EAN-13 code, that identifies the CD Audio, it disappears.

EAN code can’t be saved.

Please explain how to solve the problem.

Software used: Toast 11.1 and Mac OSX 10.6.8 Snow Leopard.

Thank you.

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Could you please explain how I can see the EAN code has been added to the disc image file?

The disc image file appears in my desktop as a “.aiff” file featuring al the CD tracks, and can be opened and listened with my audio editor, Bias Peak Pro 7.

Where the EAN code and the ISRC codes could be seen?

Furthermore, could you please explain why the “.disc” file doesn’t include the EAN code, while the disc image does?

Thank you.

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Could you please explain how I can see the EAN code has been added to the disc image file?

For my test disc, I saved a disc image file in Sd2f format with an EAN code. Then I closed and relaunched Toast, starting with a new blank window. Then I dragged the .Sd2f back to the Toast Audio CD window, and looked for the presence of the product code, which was there.

 

Furthermore, could you please explain why the “.disc” file doesn’t include the EAN code, while the disc image does?

That is something only the folks at Roxio can answer. They programmed Toast to not include it.

(In my opinion, it would be logical to include codes like these in the project file.)

Edited by theoldarchiver
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Thanks for your reply.

Yes, I have successfully saved the disk image in Sd2F format including the EAN-13 code.

The Sd2F file keeps the EAN code.

Now I have 2 questions regarding disk image, maybe obvious, however meaningful to me.

Could you please explain in plain words what for a disk image is for, and why it is convenient to use it instead of the original audio files.

1) Should I burn my Audio CD using the disk image instead of the original .aiff audio files I have edited with Peak 7

2) If I use a CD duplicator (a multi burner tower or the like), may I use the disk image created with TOAST 11, instead of the .aiff audio files. I mean uploading to the internal duplicator’s hard drive the disk image of each CD I want to duplicate?

Thank you.

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Could you please explain in plain words what for a disk image is for, and why it is convenient to use it instead of the original audio files.

A disc image allows you to save all the content and formatting into one file. This can be convenient if you have sources on multiple drives, or if you want to make multiple copies with one drive, which may act as source AND destination. You can send a disc image over a network as-is. You can burn a few discs today, shut down and continue tomorrow with the exact same content. Everything is included, such as content, gaps, custom fades, etc. -- which you may not want to do twice, if something goes wrong (crash, power outage, etc.).

 

1) Should I burn my Audio CD using the disk image instead of the original .aiff audio files I have edited with Peak 7
I think it shouldn't make a difference. But using a disc image may be more safe, as there is no preparation before burning, no uncertainty if the optical drive will wake up from sleep mode.

 

2) If I use a CD duplicator (a multi burner tower or the like), may I use the disk image created with TOAST 11, instead of the .aiff audio files. I mean uploading to the internal duplicator’s hard drive the disk image of each CD I want to duplicate?

I haven't worked with duplicators, so I don't know if there are limitations or benefits. Do you operate such a device with Toast or is it stand-alone? Does the duplicator's manual mention compatibility with Sd2f files?

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A disc image allows you to save all the content and formatting into one file. This can be convenient if you have sources on multiple drives, or if you want to make multiple copies with one drive, which may act as source AND destination. You can send a disc image over a network as-is. You can burn a few discs today, shut down and continue tomorrow with the exact same content. Everything is included, such as content, gaps, custom fades, etc. -- which you may not want to do twice, if something goes wrong (crash, power outage, etc.).

 

I think it shouldn't make a difference. But using a disc image may be more safe, as there is no preparation before burning, no uncertainty if the optical drive will wake up from sleep mode.

 

 

I haven't worked with duplicators, so I don't know if there are limitations or benefits. Do you operate such a device with Toast or is it stand-alone? Does the duplicator's manual mention compatibility with Sd2f files?

 

The duplicator I would like to use is stand alone. I haven't purchased it yet. I'm planning to buy it in September. It is an inexpensive ADR Cube robotic autoloader duplicator. Before buying it I will check out if it is compatible with Sd2f files. I think it should. Thank you.

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