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It can be done and is even built into the Windows OS, however it is not as good as you might think and any Thumb drive out there far outstrips anything a CD can do :lol:

 

But start by telling us What Roxio Software you have and the Version (should be part of the name)

 

Then tell us HOW you burned the disc, the specific program and settings.

 

Lastly in the main interface you should be able to get Tool - Disc Info. What does it say about that disc?

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It can be done and is even built into the Windows OS, however it is not as good as you might think and any Thumb drive out there far outstrips anything a CD can do :lol:

 

But start by telling us What Roxio Software you have and the Version (should be part of the name)

 

Then tell us HOW you burned the disc, the specific program and settings.

 

Lastly in the main interface you should be able to get Tool - Disc Info. What does it say about that disc?

 

My computer is Imac, OS 10.6.8

Roxio Toast Titanium 10.09

Setup: Mac&PC- Data; size 129.4MB

Disc: HP cd-r 52x

Re all files on the dics: "This file is read-only."

Disc info: Sharing and Permissions, You can only read

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We will move this to the MAC Forums and someone there can help ;)

 

A short lesson on Optical Media will still apply to all platforms.

 

The are only Two Forms of writing that allow "editing".

 

BOTH are data discs - Music CD's - DVD and BD Movies CANNOT be edited!!!

 

There is Session Writing and Packet Writing.

 

Session Writing - adds to a disc. Old files are written again but their 'space' can never be recovered + there is an overhead cost for each time you write anything.

 

Packet Writing allows you to actually delete files and rewrite or add new ones, the disc acts just like a HDD or thumb drive only slower :D While this may seem ideal, it has never been stable with complete data loss without warning :huh:

 

This is why after nearly 20 years almost no one uses either method -_-

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Editing the CD after it is burned? What kind of editing? The customary way is the copy the contents to a hard drive, edit and then burn a new CD. As Jim explained it is possible on a Mac to do incremental - or session - writing, but Macs (and Toast) don't support packet writing. Session writing on a Mac is interesting in that the sessions appear as individual volumes on the desktop.

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