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Audio Capture


outerbank
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I can't believe that this audio capture continues to be a frustration. Have not been working with Creator 2011 on Win 7 very long. In the process of recreating a slide show production from 6:3 format to 16:9 format and eventual burning to ACVHD disc. Right now I am working on Adding Background Audio. In preparation for editing a audio track, I've come across some very different sound settings in Win 7 as compared to Win XP. For example, opening up Playback Devices, when Speakers is enabled and Digital Audio is disabled and an audio track is played from Windows Media Player, the audio track can be heard. When Digital Audio is also enabled, no sound is heard. However,

disabling Digital Audio means record does not function. What are the settings to be to both hear and record the desired audio track?

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You asked "What are the settings to be to both hear and record the desired audio track? "

 

What audio device/chip do you have? The ability to hear and record is dependent on that and Windows settings. It has little to do with Creator 2011.

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The audio device/chip is a Realtek. The computer is dual boot. I have used Creator 2011 on Win XP and was able to listen to a audio track that was being played in Windows Media Player, while at the same time recording the audio track to Roxio's Sound Editor for future editing. Tried to do the same thing in Win 7. The same Creator 2011 program has been installed on the Win 7 OS. Going to the Sound settings in Win 7, there are the icons for Speakers, Microphone front and rear, and the icon for Digital Audio (S/PDIF). If the speaker icon is enabled I can hear the audio track, but cannot record. If Digital Audio is enabled, the audio track is not played while recording. How do you get both the sound and recording?

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If the sound card you using has a "line in" port, connect your speakers to that port and in the Creator program click on the "Music-Audio" app and then click on "Capture audio from sound card"

That should capture the sound o your computer.

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I've tried every combination of settings in the Playback Devices and Record Devices and yet, however the settings are made, either the sound from WMP can be heard and record doesn't work, or sound can't be heard but record works. The sound card that is used is an integrated card. There is just one speaker output plug, and it is from the sound card. Clicking on the Music-Audio app produces the same result as previously described.

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I suppose this is another reason not to like Win 7 OS. Here's what is odd. Performing this same task in Win XP, it is possible to open Windows Media Player, minimize the window to about 3" high at the bottom of the screen, and then open up Sound Editor and minimize the window to about the same height and have the window above WMP window. Two program windows on the monitor screen. One is WMP, the other Sound Editor. It is possible to start playing an audio track in WMP, hear the sound of the audio track, open up the Record window in Sound Editor and record the audio track in Sound Editor while the sound track continues to be heard in WMP. Same computer, with dual boot operating systems. I've performed this operation a number of times in the past. And, most importantly, the only output from the integrated sound chip is the output where speakers are connected. On the "Capture Sound from sound card" option described by REDWAGON, your correct it isn't available on the computer. What is shown in Sound Editor (Record) is "Capture From", but the box is entirely blue. In otherwords, nothing. The "Input" box indicates "Line Volume". Finally, the "Record Internet Audio" button is highlighted.

 

However, the supposed improved Win 7 OS is apparently incapable of performing the same task. At least, I haven't found a means to do this within Win 7. Please don't ask why I would want to do this. Such an explanation would just divert attention from the discussion at hand. I've been able to get around the problem. I did the audio editing in Win XP, saved the audio track in XP, and then accessed the audio track after booting up in Win 7. Copied the edited track to the desired file in Win 7 and it worked like a charm. Possibly someone else has a solution to how the sound settings can be made to accomplish the same objective. However, most on this forum would probaly not want to waste their time with this issue.

 

Thanks for the suggestions.

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I suppose this is another reason not to like Win 7 OS. Here's what is odd. Performing this same task in Win XP, it is possible to open Windows Media Player, minimize the window to about 3" high at the bottom of the screen, and then open up Sound Editor and minimize the window to about the same height and have the window above WMP window. Two program windows on the monitor screen. One is WMP, the other Sound Editor. It is possible to start playing an audio track in WMP, hear the sound of the audio track, open up the Record window in Sound Editor and record the audio track in Sound Editor while the sound track continues to be heard in WMP. Same computer, with dual boot operating systems. I've performed this operation a number of times in the past. And, most importantly, the only output from the integrated sound chip is the output where speakers are connected. On the "Capture Sound from sound card" option described by REDWAGON, your correct it isn't available on the computer. What is shown in Sound Editor (Record) is "Capture From", but the box is entirely blue. In otherwords, nothing. The "Input" box indicates "Line Volume". Finally, the "Record Internet Audio" button is highlighted.

 

However, the supposed improved Win 7 OS is apparently incapable of performing the same task. At least, I haven't found a means to do this within Win 7. Please don't ask why I would want to do this. Such an explanation would just divert attention from the discussion at hand. I've been able to get around the problem. I did the audio editing in Win XP, saved the audio track in XP, and then accessed the audio track after booting up in Win 7. Copied the edited track to the desired file in Win 7 and it worked like a charm. Possibly someone else has a solution to how the sound settings can be made to accomplish the same objective. However, most on this forum would probaly not want to waste their time with this issue.

 

Thanks for the suggestions.

Well, if you have a work around for getting your task done then I would say keep it up. I work a lot with audio files and it doesn't matter where the audio originated I can capture it using W7 pro and Creator 2012 Pro and using a dedicated sound card that has a line it port. The W7 OS I don't think is your problem. It's most likely the hardware and programing that is not capable. Good luck with your audio capture tasks. You have found a way to get what you want done and that is always good !
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Just out of curiosity, how do you have your "Playback" and "Record" devices set? Here is how the listed devices are set on my computer;

 

Playback Tab:

Speakers icon- enabled

Headphone icon- disabled

Digital Audio (S/PDIF)- disabled

 

Record Tab:

Microphone icon- (front) active Not Plugged In

Microphone icon -(rear) active Not Plugged In

Line In (two RCA type plugs as icon - rear panel 3.5 mm jack, dark blue dot to represent plug, active Not Plugged In

 

The 3.5 mm plugs on the rear of the computer are; pink, green and light blue. The powered speakers are plugged into the green plug.

 

The reason for remarking that Win 7 OS may be deficient is that XP can do what Win 7 hasn't, utilizing the same integrated audio card. Seems odd.

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The reason Win 7 OS can't record audio from WMP while also playing the audio sound is that the Win 7 OS uses a Microsoft internal Hi Def device that is different than the Realtek device used in Win XP. On my computer in Win 7 OS it has a location of 2. The driver date is 11/19/2010, and is version 6.1.7601.17514. A check to determine if there is an update, the computer returned that the driver is up to date.

 

The Realtek Hi Def audio device is at location 65535. Its driver date is 3/27/2012 and is version 5.10.0.6602. No need to pursue this any further.

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For anyone interested in a solution to the problem that began this thread, here it is. When Win 7 OS was installed, the Microsoft drivers for the internal hi def audio device were the only ones installed. Consequently, the Realtek audio device which also exists on the computer was not recognized/utilized while running the Win 7 OS. Looked up the number of the Intel motherboard, went to Intel's download website and found the appropriate Realtek 64 bit drivers for Win 7 OS. The Realtek audio device is now recognized and operating. Made the appropriate settings and now it's possible to hear the audio track that is playing in WMP, while at the same time recording the track in Sound Editor.

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